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Pakistan

The Takeaway

President Obama's Quiet Agenda in Asia

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

President Obama arrived in Indonesia this morning, for the second stop on his 10-day trip in Asia. As he meets with world leaders in India, Indonesia, South Korea and Japan, the President will talk about global security, international trade and economics, improving cultural ties, diplomatic efforts and preventing terrorism. But some issues will be conspicuously missing from his public agenda.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Prospects for Indian-Pakistani Peace

Thursday, November 04, 2010

President Obama travels to India this weekend, and while his trip may come at time of heightened tensions between in the region, but India and Pakistan have been feuding for decades. Ending that conflict has become a centerpiece of the President’s foreign policy. On today’s second Underreported segment Mira Kamdar, senior fellow at the World Policy Institute and an associate fellow at the Asia Society looks at prospects for a comprehensive (and elusive) peace deal between India and Pakistan, and what it could mean for U.S. interests in the region, including in Afghanistan.

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Features

South Asian Films Get the NYC Spotlight

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Usually you'd have to make a trip to South Asia to see independent films made in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh. But in the next few weeks, you can check out films from the region at not one but two film festivals in New York City.

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The Takeaway

Looking for the 'New Bin Laden'

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

U.S. intelligence officers call him “The New Bin Laden.” Forty-six year old Pakistan-born Ilyas Kashmiri has long years of experience planning commando terror attacks and a declared goal of attacking the West. Intelligence services believe he hopes to run Mumbai-style bomb attacks in western Europe; coalition drone attacks have reportedly been aimed at finding Kashmiri near the Pakistan/Afghanistan border.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan and Washington Prepare for High Level Talks

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Is Pakistan our ally or is it home to our greatest threat? President Obama and his national security team, who already grapple with that question on a daily basis, will be examining it again as high level Pakistani officials arrive in Washington later this week. Pakistan's foreign minister, Shah Mahmood Qureshi, and General Ashfaq Kayani, the head of Pakistan's military who is thought to be the most powerful man in the country, head to Washington at a particularly contentious time of U.S.-Pakistan relations.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Elections, Health Care, and Pakistan

Monday, October 18, 2010

Mid-term elections are just two weeks away, and a frenzy of campaigning from President Obama, First Lady Michelle, and the Tea Party express is about to get underway.

Takeaway managing producer, Noel King, and Charlie Herman, business and economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC Radio, explore what's ahead this week as we get close to election day.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Update on Pakistan's Flood-Stricken Regions

Thursday, October 07, 2010

It’s been more than two months since flood waters started rising in Pakistan. On today’s Underreported, as the waters from the worst flooding in 80 years continue to recede, we get an update on how relief efforts are going and the challenges that workers there face. Michelle Fanzo, Project Leader for the World Policy Institute, and Dorothy Blane, Country Director for Concern Worldwide, join us to discuss how the flooding continues to affect Pakistan and its government.

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The Takeaway

Military Aggressively Pursues Alternative Energy

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

Though Congress may have failed to pass an energy bill to reduce the nation's dependence on fossil fuels, the military isn't wasting time developing renewable energy technologies. A Marine company in Helmand Province in southern Afghanistan has become the first to take renewable technology into a battle zone, arriving last week with solar powered tents and chargers.

The military's decision was less about environmental concerns than practicality. In recent weeks, already treacherous supply routes over the Khyber Pass from Pakistan to Afghanistan have become even more fraught with danger, culminating in the attack of several NATO oil tankers on Monday. Military leaders are hoping the push toward alternative energies will save lives in the long run.

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The Takeaway

As Europe Braces for Terror, US Escalates Drone Attacks in Pakistan

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Reports of a sudden up-tick of CIA drone attacks in the Waziristan region of Pakistan this morning coincide with what U.S. officials are describing as a "credible but not specific" terror threat in Europe this week. If these reports are true, it would bring the total number of drone attacks in September to 21, the highest number of drone attacks carried out in a single month yet. Information about the European threat reportedly comes from a suspected German terrorist, identified as Ahmed Sidiqi, in U.S. custody at Bagram air base in Afghanistan. The Washington Post's Greg Miller has been following this story and joins the program with the latest.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Fatima Bhutto on Pakistan's Political Dynasty

Friday, September 24, 2010

Fatima Bhutto, daughter of Murtaza Bhutto and niece of Benazir Bhutto, discusses her father’s murder and the long line of tragedies in her family. Songs of Blood & Sword: A Daughter’s Memoir reveals how a family of feudal landlords became powerbrokers and politicians.

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The Takeaway

Pakistani Neuroscientist Sentenced to 86 Years

Friday, September 24, 2010

In the U.S., she's considered a terrorist. At home in Pakistan, she's a hero. Aafia Siddiqui, an M.I.T.-educated, Pakistani neuroscientist was convicted of attempting to kill American soldiers and F.B.I. agents in a Manhattan Federal District Court on Thursday. The BBC's Adam Mynott reports live from Islamabad.

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The Takeaway

Bettering Impressions of America in Pakistan

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Pakistan is still recuperating from the disastrous floods last month that ravaged towns along the Indus River. The United States has played a major role in recovery efforts, sending billions of dollars in aid. Anti-American feelings that have run high in Pakistan for several years are starting to see signs of being reset. 

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The Takeaway

A Journey Down Pakistan's Indus River

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

In Pakistan, the Indus River is vital to the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of Pakistanis, and, as we saw last month, has the power to destroy just as many. As the flood waters receded, the BBC's Aleem Maqbool travelled along the river, seeing not only the physical scars left, but also the mental distress left in those communities that witnessed one of the worst natural disasters in their country's history.

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The Takeaway

Taliban Vows to Disrupt Pakistan Relief Effort

Tuesday, September 07, 2010

The Taliban claimed responsibility for the latest suicide attack, whcih killed 19 people. Today the group threatened to continue to target Pakistani security forces with suicide attacks. This comes at a time when Pakistan is still struggling to recover from massive flooding, which has killed more than 1500 people and destroyed infrastructure and agriculture. Issam Ahmed, reporter for the Christian Science Monitor is in South Punjab, one of the regions that has been hit worst by the flood. He says that the government is taking the Taliban's theat very seriously and describes the mood of the country. "When the state can't protect its own people, you have that ongoing fear that they could strike at any time," he says.

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The Takeaway

Tennis Players Use Court to Unify Indian Subcontinent

Friday, September 03, 2010

Aisam-Ul-Haq Qureshi holds the honor of being Pakistan’s number one ranked tennis player; but, as he competes in the U.S. Open, it is clear that he is playing for more than just the gold. Qureshi competes alongside doubles partner Rohann Bopanna; the pair has been dubbed "The Indo-Pak Express" on the international tennis circuit because Qureshi is a Pakistani Muslim, and Bopanna a Hindu from India.

And while the pair has explicitly stated their aim to overcome sixty years of hostility between their countries, the question remains: how can tennis heal the cultural wounds on the subcontinent?

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The Takeaway

As Floodwaters Recede, Some Pakistanis View US Differently

Thursday, September 02, 2010

Ad Pakistan struggles to cope with a devastating flood, the U.S. has stepped in, delivering aid, boxes of biscuits and sacks of flour, and evacuating people from flooded areas by helicopter.  The U.S. has become the single biggest international donor to Pakistan during these troubles and their presence and aid has shifted Pakistani perceptions of America. However, this may not necessarily mean a consistently positive relationship on a political level.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Pakistan Flooding

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Issam Ahmed, correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor, and Mohsin Zaheer, editor of Sada-e-Pakistan, a Pakistani-American newspaper for the New York area, describe the flooding in Pakistan and the local reaction.  

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The Takeaway

What Was The "Restoring Honor" Rally All About?; Concussions in Children and Adolescents; More on Income Inequality; Eliza Griswold on "The Tenth Parallel"

Monday, August 30, 2010

Examining Glenn Beck's "Restoring Honor" rally in Washington, D.C., and what it means for American politics; exploring the relationship between New York City's Muslim community and the NYPD since 9/11; a look ahead to what'll be making the news this week; the danger of concussions in children and adolescents; a continuing look into the possible link between income inequality and financial crises; examining whether the Tea Party is taking a religious turn; more on the Chilean miners, and being trapped with your co-workers; Mexico to begin discussing the legalization of Marijuana in the wake of ongoing drug-related violence; journalist Eliza Griswold talks about her new book "The Tenth Parallel."

WQXR News

U.N. Appeals for Aid to Pakistan

Friday, August 27, 2010

Renewed flooding swelled the Indus River in Pakistan on Friday, forcing thousands more people from their homes, according to The Associated Press.

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The Takeaway

In Pakistan, Specter of Militant Attack on Aid Workers

Friday, August 27, 2010

Pakistan's Taliban hinted on Thursday that they may attack humanitarian workers who are helping to provide relief to more than eight million people affected by catastrophic flooding. "No relief is reaching the affected people, and when the victims are not receiving help, then this horde of foreigners is not acceptable to us at all," a Taliban spokesman told the Associated Press. How do you bring aid to people in need when there are factions in the country threatening attack on those trying to help?

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