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Pakistan

The Takeaway

How Will Raymond Davis Incident Affect US-Pakistan Relations?

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

The State Department remains tight-lipped on the role of the American man recently arrested in Pakistan for murder. The man in question, Raymond Davis, was suspected of being a spy. The Obama administration claimed that Davis had diplomatic immunity and should be set free from Pakistani custody. Last Friday, P.J. Crowley, State Department Spokesman would only say to The Takeaway that Davis is a U.S. Diplomat entitled to diplomatic immunity. You can hear that interview here. But reports out yesterday confirm that Davis was working in a part of a C.I.A. team, as an independent contractor. Either way, what does the case of Raymond Davis mean for the U.S. Pakistan relationship? 

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The Takeaway

Pakistan: Who is Diplomat Raymond Davis?

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Tensions are on the rise between the U.S. and Pakistan because of a man named Raymond Davis. Davis is an American who has admitted to killing two Pakistani men in Lahore. The Pakistani police say it was cold-blooded murder, while Davis pleads it was in self-defense. Davis says two men on a motorcycle tried to car jack him at gunpoint, in which he responded by killing the two men with his own gun. A third person was killed when they were run over by an American consulate vehicle, as they came to Davis's rescue. 

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The Takeaway

Dispatches from a Desperate Pakistan

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

In Pakistan thousands of pilgrims have taken part in the holy Shia festival of Arbaeen, many risking their own lives after two suicide bombers killed at least twelve people. In Lahore and Karachi most of the dead were policemen, challenging the bombers before they could reach the most crowded places.

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WNYC News

Death of Pakistani Leader Stuns Many New Yorkers

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

The assassination of Salman Taseer, governor of Pakistan's Punjab province, by one of his own armed guards Tuesday is hitting home for Pakistanis in New York.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan on Alert Following Killing of Salman Taseer

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

Pakistan's Punjab governor Salman Taseer was shot dead yesterday by one of his bodyguards, who shot him 30 times. The governor was a businessman and a publisher of a liberal English-language daily. Recently, he was working to repeal Pakistan's blasphemy laws, which lead to fiery demonstrations by religious parties. BBC reporter, Aleem Maqbool is in Lahore, Pakistan, where Taseer's funeral is taking place.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan's Ruling Coalition Loses a Political Party, Undermining Stability

Monday, January 03, 2011

Pakistan's second largest political party has abandoned Prime Minister Yusuf Raza Gilani's coalition to join the opposition, depriving the government of its majority and weakening a key United States ally. How does this defection affect Pakistan, and the two nations' work in Afghanistan and against the Taliban? We're joined for more on the story by Aleem Maqbool, Pakistan correspondent for our partner the BBC. 

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Pakistan's Shaky Democracy, Morning Headlines

Monday, January 03, 2011

Political changes in Pakistan continue to shake the country's already fragile democracy, alongside security concerns and the threat of the Taliban. 

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The Takeaway

Pakistan Debates Blasphemy Laws

Friday, December 31, 2010

In Pakistan a new controversy — and a national strike of religious parties — is emerging over proposed changes in draconian blasphemy laws. One of the laws says if you insult the Koran, you can be executed. The proposed changes are in part the results of pressure from the West, which is coming up against religious conservatives in the country. We're joined for more on the story by Jill McGivering, who is reporting for our partner the BBC. 

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The Takeaway

Pakistani Women Defy Tradition to Take Jobs

Monday, December 27, 2010

Financial necessity is bringing more Pakistani women out of traditional roles at home and into service-sector jobs, despite cultural opposition. Pakistan's professional workforce has consisted mainly of men for generations, but more and more families need two incomes just to survive. Many working women have taken jobs with western companies, including McDonalds and KFC; but husbands and brothers often pressure them to give up their jobs, despite the extra money brought in.

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The Takeaway

Pentagon to Release Review of War Effort in Afghanistan

Thursday, December 16, 2010

The Pentagon will release its highly awaited review of U.S. policy in Afghanistan today. Early leaks from the report indicate that some progress has been made in President Obama's stated goal of defeating al-Qaida in Afghanistan. But The Washington Post reports a high-level U.S. official says Pakistan is failing to pursue insurgents who cross the border into Afghanistan and then retreat into Pakistani territory. We talk to Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, the former Pakistani ambassador to the U.K., for more on the story. 

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It's A Free Country ®

Afghanistan After Holbrooke

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

You could feel in his commentary skepticism about America's Afghanistan project, and I found this really revealing given the final words he's alleged to have said before he was sedated for surgery, telling his doctor and family that we've got to end the Afghanistan war...I talked to a very senior member of his staff yesterday and I said, "What do you think about those words?" and he said, "Steve, those are my instructions from the boss. We are all going to work as hard as we can to take these last words and make them mean something."

- Steve Clemons, director of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation, speaking about US Diplomat Richard Holbrooke on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Assessing Afghanistan After Holbrooke

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

President Obama is speaking about the latest assessment of the war in Afghanistan on Thursday.  Steve Clemons, director of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation and the man behind the popular political blog The Washington Note, previews the report and discusses how the death of Richard Holbrooke will affect US policy in Afghanistan.

→ Read More and Join The Conversation At It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Richard Holbrooke's Life and Last Words

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Hours after Ambassador Richard Holbrooke died, it was widely reported that his last words, spoken to his surgeon, were, "You've got to stop this war in Afghanistan." Many heard these words as striking, epitomizing Holbrooke's life-long dedication to foreign policy and diplomacy.

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The Takeaway

Remembering Richard Holbrooke

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Richard Holbrooke, the United States Special Representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan, passed away yesterday after undergoing a marathon surgery that failed to save his life. He was 69. Across a long career in foreign policy, Holbrooke dedicated his life to brokering peace and stability throughout the world on behalf of the United States.

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The Takeaway

Pakistanis Suing CIA For Deaths From Drone Attacks

Friday, December 10, 2010

In Pakistan, the Campaign for Innocent Victims in Conflict (CIViC) is calling on the U.S. to acknowledge the number of civilians killed by drone attacks. According to the group, about 1,000 civilians have died in drone-related attacks; the U.S. says few civilians have been killed. We talk with the BBC's Aleem Maqbool, in Islamabad, for more on this story.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

"Bhutto"

Thursday, December 02, 2010

Duane Baughman, director and producer of “Bhutto,” and producer Mark Siegel, an intimate friend of Benazir Bhutto who helped her write her autobiography, Daughter of Destiny, discuss the politics of Pakistan and the life and assassination of the first female prime minister, Benazir Bhutto. “Bhutto” opens December 3 at Cinema Village.

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The Takeaway

Wikileaks Documents Shed Light on US-Pakistani Relations

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Among the State Department cables leaked on WikiLeaks and analyzed in The New York Times were messages from the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan about the country's nuclear fuel resources. In a cable dating May 27, 2009, Amb. Anne W. Pateron reported her concern over a stockpile of highly enriched uranium, which had been sitting for years near an aging research nuclear reactor in Pakistan. There was enough to build several “dirty bombs” or, in skilled hands, possibly enough for an actual nuclear bomb.

The cables show that underneath public assurances lie deep clashes over strategic goals on issues like Pakistan’s support for the Afghan Taliban and tolerance of Al Qaida.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan's High Commissioner on Nuclear Security

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

On of the United States' largest concerns in the Middle East has long been the relative security of Pakistan, and more specifically, the security of that country's nuclear weapons. America provides millions of dollars in aid there, and the Pakistani government is considered an ally in an unstable area of the world. But in a country where the Taliban and other organizations have infiltrated the state military, it's a constant balancing act. 

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: Copenhagen To Open Bike Superhighways, and the Return of the Roosevelt Island Tram

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

More on the FTA demanding repayment of $271 million in ARC Tunnel money from New Jersey Transit in the Wall Street Journal.

Construction company Schiavone, which has worked on the subway stations at Times Square and South Ferry, admitted that it defrauded government programs and evaded federal minority hiring requirements. (New York Times)

Copenhagen to open bike "superhighways," which will hopefully alleviate the "two-wheeler traffic jams (which) are especially regular on the main Noerrebrogade thoroughfare used by around 36,000 cyclists a day." (Grist)

Lufthansa says it will begin using biofuel on a daily flight beginning next year. (Alt Transport)

RadioBoston looks at a new interactive map that shows all of Boston's reported bike crashes.

London Underground employees take part in another 24-hour strike--and say that walkouts could escalate in 2011. (BBC)

In Pakistan, trucks aren't just vehicles--they're art. (World Vision via WBEZ)

Some cities are testing a new network-based approach to parking. "Streetline...mounts low-cost sensors in parking spaces, retrofits existing meters and ties them into a mesh wireless network to draw a real-time picture of the spaces available, the cars needing tickets and how much to charge for parking." (Wired)  One of those places is Roosevelt Island, which may also begin its own bike share program. (DNA Info)

Speaking of all things R.I., the Roosevelt Island tram returns to service today. Just to be on the safe side, pack some lunch and forego drinking liquids 12 hours before boarding.

The Nissan Leaf wins the 2011 European Car of the Year designation. Take that, Chevy Volt! (USA Today)

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The Takeaway

Pakistanis Still Homeless From Floods Blame Government Corruption

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Millions in Pakistan are still without a home as winter quickly approaches. The BBC's Jill McGivering just returned from one of the most affected regions. McGivering reports that many of the victims say government officials are corrupt and are withholding resources, including blankets, money and shelter. But Pakistan Interior Minister Rehman Malik tells McGivering "this is dishonesty on the part of the people."

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