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Pakistan

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Next Chapter with Pakistan

Friday, May 06, 2011

Daniel Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations, talks about the implications of the killing of Osama bin Laden on the relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan and Matt Rosenberg, correspondent in Pakistan for the Wall Street Journal, reports from the ground in Pakistan on the reaction to Osama bin Laden's death.

→ Listen, Read a Recap, and Add Your Comments at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Did US Overstep Legal Bounds in Bin Laden Mission?

Friday, May 06, 2011

On Thursday, the head of Pakistan’s army, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani said that he would not tolerate future covert missions by the United States within his borders. Does that mean that the U.S. has overstretched its reach in the war against al-Qaida? That's the question international law experts have been addressing since Monday's covert operation, which ended with the death of former al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden.

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It's A Free Country ®

Do You Want the Bin Laden Photos Released?

Thursday, May 05, 2011

WNYC
As an American I really want to see the image… as a Pakistani, I wouldn’t want the image up, because I feel like there will always be retaliation.

A Pakistani-American caller on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Nicholas Kristof on the Ripple Effect of Osama Bin Laden's Death

Thursday, May 05, 2011

The ripple effect of Osama bin Laden’s death is already being felt. In Yemen, an al-Qaida stronghold, at least 10 people were killed and more than 20 injured when gunmen believed to be al-Qaida members attacked two security patrols in the southern province of Abyan. But in Afghanistan, analysts believe that Osama bin Laden's death may lead the Taliban to finally sever their ties to al-Qaida — a move the Obama Administration and President Hamid Karzai’s regime have demanded as a condition for opening up negotiations with insurgents.

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The Takeaway

Why Didn't Pakistan Know Bin Laden Was There?

Thursday, May 05, 2011

Pakistanis are obsessed with the question of why no one knew that Osama bin Laden was living in their country, just north of the capital. "There is a sense of embarrassment that it wasn't the Pakistani forces that killed Osama bin Laden, but that it was Americans," says the BBC's Aleem Maqbool. There is also a sense that the Pakistani authorities must have known that he was there, while at the same time, residents want proof that the al-Qaida leader is dead.

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The Takeaway

Abbottabad Residents Unaware Bin Laden Lived in Their Midst

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

What if the world's most wanted man was hiding out in your own hometown? That's the case for Ali Bokhari, a doctor from Abbottabad — the garrison town just an hour's drive north of Pakistan's capital where Osama bin Laden was living. We talk with Bokhari, who says he's driven by the large compound hundreds of times and never suspected the al-Qaida leader was living there.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Anatol Lieven on Pakistan

Tuesday, May 03, 2011

Anatol Lieven, professor in the War Studies department at King’s College, London, and Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation talks about Pakistan’s increasing importance to south Asia and to the United States. He’ll discuss the rise of Islamic extremism and the Taliban in the area, and U.S. relations with Pakistan in the war on terror, the search and discovery of Osama bin Laden, and the war in Afghanistan. His latest book is Pakistan: A Hard Country.

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The Takeaway

Muslim Religious Leader on Bin Laden's Death

Tuesday, May 03, 2011

In the wake of the September 11th attacks, America's relationship to Muslims at home and abroad changed. A new climate of fear and suspicion was born, though in some cases so were attempts at greater understanding between members of different faiths. For a look at how the death of Osama Bin Laden might affect the relationship between Muslims and members of other faiths in the US, we turn to Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, founder of the Cordoba Initiative, a multi-faith organization which works to build trust among people of different faiths and cultures.

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It's A Free Country ®

After Bin Laden Raid, Lingering Questions About Pakistan

Monday, May 02, 2011

The U.S. has known for a long time that Pakistan is playing a double game, but the U.S. doesn't have many options. We play the cards we're dealt. The ISI has very different priorities from the U.S., and the tricky game the CIA had to play is to try and get little pieces of genuine information in middle of a lot of fake information.

Bobby Ghosh, deputy international editor for Time Magazine, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Former Head of CIA's bin Laden Unit on the Al Qaeda Leader's Death

Monday, May 02, 2011

Michael Scheuer, who led the CIA's Osama bin Laden Tracking Unit from 1996 to 1999 and was a counterterrorism analyst until 2004, discusses  bin Laden's death and what it means for al Qaeda and the continuing military operations in Afghanistan. His latest book is Osama bin Laden.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Raid

Monday, May 02, 2011

Osama bin Laden was killed during a raid on a compound in Pakistan by U.S. special-operations forces.  Bobby Ghosh, deputy international editor for Time Magazine, goes through the details.

Listen, Read a Recap and Add Your Comments at It's A Free Country.

It's A Free Blog

Stucknation: Drones, War Crimes and Obama

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

When President Obama ran for president he took President Bush to task for his lack of a nuanced strategy when it came to the global war on terrorism. Why with the election of a President Obama, we were told, we would have a leader who would engage the Muslim world in a productive dialogue.

Scroll forward a few years. What we have is an Obama Presidency even more reliant on the use of predatory drones in the never ending "war on terror." And according to well-respected experts, this growing reliance on targeted killings in countries we are not at war with may put the current president and our nation on the wrong side of international law.

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The Takeaway

Can Unmanned Drones Save Libya?

Friday, April 22, 2011

The Libyan government has said that an American decision to deploy drone aircraft as part of the NATO operation over Libya will cause more civilian deaths. The Libyan deputy foreign minister, Khaled Kaim, said more air strikes would undermine any claims by the U.S. and NATO to be supporting democracy in Libya. The decision to use U.S. drones comes as Senator John McCain visits the opposition-held city of Benghazi for talks with rebel leaders. The BBC's Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen reports from Tripoli on reaction to the announcement and how this recasts America's role in the country.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Pakistan's Survival Tactics

Thursday, April 21, 2011

Anatol Lieven, senior research fellow at the New America Foundation and the author of  Pakistan: A Hard Country, discusses Pakistan's unique ability to survive and the current threats to its existence.

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The Takeaway

'Three Cups of Tea' Author Under Fire

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Following a CBS "60 Minutes" report that found factual errors in the best-selling book, "Three Cups of Tea," author Greg Mortenson and his charitable work in Afghanistan and Pakistan have come under fire. In the book, Mortenson writes about stumbling into a tiny village in northeastern Pakistan and coming across a group of schoolchildren doing their lessons with sticks and dirt. It was then, he writes, that he discovered his passion to build schools in Afghanistan and Pakistan. But "60 Minutes'" producers found factual errors in the book and suggest that Mortenson's charity may be spending money poorly and exaggerating their accomplishments. Mortenson is denying the allegations.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan to US Ops: Get Out

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

It's been several weeks since the CIA operative Raymond Davis was released from custody in Pakistan for reportedly killing two armed men in a traffic incident in Lahore, Pakistan. Since his release, relations between the US and Pakistan have been strained. The tensions have grown not only over the questions relating to the diplomatic immunity of Raymond Davis and his 47 days of detention, but also over a US drone attack that killed tribal leaders last month. Now Pakistan is demanding that the United States sharply reduce the number of CIA and Special Ops forces working in the country, and put drone strikes on hold.

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The Takeaway

Cricket World Cup: India vs. Pakistan

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

The prime ministers of India and Pakistan are sitting side by side today at the Cricket World Cup semi-final match between the two countries. It's an occasion which is being seen as an opportunity for the two nations to repair relations. India broke off relations with Pakistan in 2008, after it blamed Pakistani militants for attacks on Mumbai, which killed 160 people. Pakistan denied any involvement. This is probably the most watched cricket game ever with a billion people watching the game around the world. Aleem Maqbool, BBC Islamabad correspondent, reports on whether this match will help India-Pakistan relations.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Kim Barker's Taliban Shuffle

Monday, March 28, 2011

Longtime foreign correspondent Kim Barker gives an insider’s account of the war in Afghanistan and Pakistan since 2003, and captures the absurdities and tragedies of life in a war zone.  The Taliban Shuffle: Strange Days in Afghanistan and Pakistan talks about her evolution from an awkward newbie in Afghanistan to seasoned reporter with serious concerns about our ability to win hearts and minds in the region.

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The Takeaway

CIA Contractor Raymond Davis Freed

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

CIA contractor Raymond Davis has been freed from a Pakistani prison and his murder case has been dropped. He was indicted on two counts of murder in the shooting deaths of two Pakistani men that, he says, were trying to kill him. Pakistani officials say Davis was pardoned by the families of the victims in exchange for compensation. Christine Fair, assistant professor at Georgetown's Center for Peace and Security Studies. She believes that the families were urged by Pakistan's secret security forces, ISI to accept the money. How will this latest development affect U.S.- Pakistan relations?

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The Takeaway

Liberal Pakistani Minister Shot

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

Gunmen shot and killed Minister of Minorities Shahbaz Bhatti, a top liberal Pakistani minister as he was leaving his home for a cabinet meeting. Bhatti was the only Christian member of Pakistan's Cabinet. This is the second time a high-profile critic of the nation's blasphemy laws has been assasinated this year. BBC correspondent Shoaib Hassan reports from Karachi.

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