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Pakistan

The Takeaway

This Week’s Agenda: Debt Negotiations, Jobs, and Unrest in the Middle East

Monday, July 11, 2011

Negotiations over the debt ceiling continue this week, and we're taking a look at the economic impact of the trillion dollar talks. What do the latest figures for unemployment, at 9.2 percent, suggest about corporate earnings, which will be out this week?

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The Takeaway

Pakistan Intelligence Agency May Have Ordered Journalist Killing

Tuesday, July 05, 2011

Relations between the U.S. and Pakistan have been severely strained since the U.S. raid that killed Osama bin Laden took place on Pakistani soil two months ago. But a story in The New York Times spells further trouble ahead. Back in May, news broke of the disappearance and subsequent murder of Saleem Shahzad — a Pakistani journalist who frequently wrote about the presence of militants in the armed forces there. But Obama officials believe there is new evidence to suggest the agency had itself ordered the killing. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Fighting for Tolerance in Pakistan

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Former governor of Punjab Province Salman Taseer was assassinated in January. His daughter Shehrbano Taseer talks about continuing her father's work to end Pakistan's blasphemy laws.

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The Takeaway

US-Pakistan Relations and New Al-Qaida Leader, Al-Zawahiri

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Al-Qaida's long-time second in command, Ayman al-Zawahiri has been named the new leader of Al-Qaida, according to a statement released via several jihadist websites. The nearly 60-year-old al-Zawahiri had been Osama Bin Laden's deputy for more than a decade.
Christine Fair, assistant professor at Georgetown's Center for Peace and Security Studies says that al-Zawahiri lacks the charisma of Osama bin Laden; and that capturing him will likely be complicated by poor relations between the U.S. and Pakistan. Currently, Pakistani authorities are not allowing CIA officers into the country, despite promises to form a new joint intelligence-sharing team.

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The Takeaway

Tensions Worsen Between US and Pakistan

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Pakistan arrested a number of the country's CIA operatives, who had helped the U.S. find and kill Osama bin Laden. After bin Laden's death, Pakistan's military has been mired in a crisis of confidence, and has distanced itself from working with U.S. intelligence in order to combat militant groups in Pakistan. The effect that this fallout with Pakistan may have on the drone program has many U.S. officials worried.

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The Takeaway

Alleged CIA Informants Arrested in Pakistan

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

There are reports that five alleged CIA informants, who helped lead the CIA to Osama bin Laden have been arrested in Pakistan. The BBC's Aleem Maqbool is in Abbottabad, Pakistan and reports on the story. He says that according to Western officials briefed on the arrests, one of the five was at least one Pakistani army major. The Pakistani army has acknowledged the arrests, but deny that they have detained any army personnel. There has been much criticism of the leaders of the Pakistani military and intelligence agencies since Osama bin Laden's capture and killing and those leaders will be looking to prevent any similar incident happening again.

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The Takeaway

Forensic Team Will Examine Bin Laden Compound

Friday, May 27, 2011

Pakistan has given the CIA permission to enter Osama bin Laden's compound in order to take forensic samples. Greg Miller, national security correspondent for The Washington Post. "The Pakistanis were not pleased with the raid, so it is a significant concession for them to let the team into the compound in Abbottabad," says Miller. While SEAL Team 6 gathered as much as they could, but with more time and tools, the CIA will be able to more thoroughly search the compound.

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The Takeaway

Americans and Pakistanis Questioning Foreign Aid

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Why should America give millions in foreign aid to a country where the United States' number one enemy was able to hide for years? That's a question many in the U.S. are asking in the wake of the discovery of Osama Bin Laden's hideout. But it's also being asked by many in Pakistan, who wonder if America's financial aid is worth the influence and pressures that come with it. Has it helped or hurt the country? Aleem Maqbool, reporter for our partner the BBC, joins us to discuss the growing debate. 

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The Takeaway

What is Our State of Relations with Pakistan?

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Two NATO helicopters allegedly crossed over into Pakistani air space and were shot at by Pakistani ground troops yesterday morning. This incident comes at a time when relations between Pakistan and the U.S. are extremely tense and fragile. Both countries need each other, but both would love to be less dependent on the other, and are trying to find ways to accomplish that. Teresita Schaffer, former U.S. ambassador to Sri Lanka, analyzes the relationship.

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It's A Free Country ®

Afghanistan: Why We Should Stay, Post-Osama

Monday, May 16, 2011

The reason we went in was not simply to get bin Laden; in fact, it was to stabilize Afghanistan so that it can no longer serve as a sanctuary for international terrorists. Most factions of the Taliban were not directly connected to bin Laden to begin with. The demise of bin Laden really, logically, shouldn't affect much in their calculation of whether or not to continue fighting the war.

Fred Kaplan, "War Stories" columnist at Slate and a Schwartz Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Two Florida Imams Arrested on Charges of Supporting Taliban

Monday, May 16, 2011

Monday afternoon, two Florida imams are scheduled to be arraigned in a federal court in Miami after being arrested for allegedly providing financial support for the Pakistani Taliban. Imam Hafiz Muhammed Sher Ali Khan runs the city's oldest mosque, the Flagler Mosque. He, in addition to his two sons, and three others in Pakistan, were indicted for supporting terrorist organizations in Pakistan. Jay Weaver, federal courts reporter for The Miami Herald, talks about the case and the role of the Khan family in Miami.

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The Washington Report

Sen. Kerry in Pakistan, IMF Head in NYPD Custody

Monday, May 16, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in on Sen. Kerry's trip to Pakistan and the allegations against IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn.

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The Takeaway

Two Explosions Rock Police Training Center in Pakistan, Killing 80

Friday, May 13, 2011

A coordinated bombing in Shabquadar Fort, north of Peshawar Pakistan has killed at least 80 people. The Pakistan Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, saying it was a revenge killing for Osama bin Laden's death. However, the government denies that this attack was linked to Osama bin Laden. Declan Walsh, Pakistan correspondent for The Guardian describes the scene, saying "he entire town has become a ghost town." BBC correspondent Lyse Doucet says that it almost doesn't matter if the bombing was in retaliation for bin Laden's death as Pakistanis know they are "living in a volatile and increasingly violent country."

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The Takeaway

Pakistan's International Role After Bin Laden

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

It appears the U.S. is leering towards Pakistan with suspicious eyes after intelligence reports Osama bin Laden was most likely living in a compound in Abbottabad, for close to six years. The White House claims a healthy relationship with Pakistan is vital to U.S. national security. How will the relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan change after bin Laden's death — will it improve or deteriorate? And what will Pakistan's new role in the international community be? To help us answer those questions is Munir Akram, former Pakistani ambassador to the United Nations.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan's ISI Under Microscope

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) has received heavy scrutiny from the United States, after a raid by U.S. special forces on a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, lead to the killing of Osama bin Laden. Information gathered from the raid suggests bin Laden had been living in that compound for close to six years. Many question the circumstances of the most wanted man in the world had been living safely within Pakistan's borders, in a $1 million compound, for that long without anyone in the ISI knowing. However, with U.S.-Pakistan relations at stake, it is necessary to pay close attention to evidence and not jump to conclusions, says Christine Fair.

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It's A Free Country ®

Clinton Diplomacy and the Future of Middle East Policy

Monday, May 09, 2011

Voices from Washington were quite convinced that if only we get to bin Laden, if only we get rid of his senior lieutenants, there will be less reason to stay in Afghanistan and the only reason we're still there is because of him. Presumably he's been killed and now those voices need to come to terms with their own argument.

Marwan Bishara, senior political analyst for Al-Jazeera English and host of Empire, a monthly show about global powers, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Washington Report

U.S. Steps Up Pressure on Pakistan After Bin Laden's Death

Monday, May 09, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in on the increased pressure on Pakistan by the United States following the death of Osama bin Laden.

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The Takeaway

President Obama Talks Osama Death on '60 Minutes'

Monday, May 09, 2011

President Obama appeared on CBS's "60 Minutes" Sunday night to talk about what transpired leading up to the raid of Osama bin Laden's compound and his subsequent death. Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington correspondent responds to President Obama's fascinating explanation of the "decision points" that were part of the raid.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan Warning: Another Covert Op Could Worsen Relations

Friday, May 06, 2011

Questions about the covert U.S. mission in Abbottabad, Pakistan are leading to new found frustrations in the already rocky relationship between the two countries. Some American lawmakers are skeptical that the Pakistani intelligence was unaware that Osama bin Laden was hiding just an hour’s drive from the capital city of Islamabad. Meanwhile, Pakistani officials say they will not tolerate a future incident where the U.S. military engages in a covert operation in Pakistan without the government’s knowledge. What's next in the diplomatic game?

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It's A Free Country ®

US-Pakistan - What's Next?

Friday, May 06, 2011

WNYC
They believe that they have to maintain and show toughness, and this is one way that they’re seeking to do that. The removal of US military forces from Pakistan… won’t do anything with respect to the kind of operations that were undertaken against bin Laden, but it gets at this underlying defensiveness.

Daniel Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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