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Pakistan

The Takeaway

India Test-Fires Nuclear-Capable Missile

Thursday, April 19, 2012

India test-fired a nuclear-capable missile last night, capable of reaching 3,100 miles and within range of China's key cities. India joins the U.S., China, Britain, France and Russia as the only nations with these kinds of weapons. David Sanger is the chief Washington correspondent for our partner the New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Details About Osama bin Laden's Nine Years on the Run

Friday, March 30, 2012

New details have come to light about the nine years Osama bin Laden spent on the run in Pakistan after 9/11. We now know he moved among five safe houses and fathered four children, at least two of whom were born in a government hospital. The information has come from a police report by the Dawn newspaper. Mubashir Zaidi is the head of Dawn TV, the Islamabad studio of our partner the BBC.

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The Takeaway

Call to Secure Nuclear Material at Seoul Summit

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

World leaders have called for closer cooperation to tackle the threat of nuclear terrorism at a summit on nuclear security in Seoul, South Korea. President Obama is among the world leaders in attendance. At the end of the summit there was a joint call to secure "vulnerable nuclear material". Lucy Williamson, a correspondent for our partner the BBC, joins us to discuss the Seoul summit and Obama's private meeting with Pakistani Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gillani.

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The Takeaway

Tensions High as President Obama Prepares to Meet with Pakistani Prime Minister

Monday, March 26, 2012

Pakistan was once the U.S.’s principal ally in the Afghanistan war. But tensions between the two countries have grown since the U.S. raid that killed Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad last May. Pakistan’s Parliament is currently debating the future of its relationship with the United States and President Obama is set to meet with Pakistan Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani in Seoul tomorrow. How will the U.S. move forward on Pakistan and how will strained relations between the two countries affect our current efforts in Afghanistan? Joining us is Christine Fair, professor at the Center for Peace and Security Studies at Georgetown University.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Future of America, Pakistan, and Afghanistan

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Journalist Ahmed Rashid examines the complicated relationship between the United States, Pakistan, and Afghanistan as America prepares for its withdraw from Afghanistan. In Pakistan on the Brink: The Future of America, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, he investigates the future of international terrorism, the Taliban, and strategies to bring stability to a fractured region saddled with a legacy of violence and corruption.

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The Takeaway

"Saving Face": An Oscar-Winning Look at Acid Attacks in Pakistan

Thursday, March 08, 2012

There are at least 100 reports of acid attacks in Pakistan each year, and they're overwhelmingly against women. This figure only accounts for the reported cases — it’s assumed that many more go unreported.

The Academy Award-winning documentary short film "Saving Face" looks at this phenomenon through the experiences of three people: Zakia, a 39-year-old woman whose husband threw acid on her after she filed for divorce; Rukhasana, a 23-year-old woman who was attacked by her husband and his family; and Dr. Mohammad Jawad, a plastic surgeon dedicated to healing the faces of the injured women.

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The Takeaway

In Afghanistan, Rioting Over Koran-Burning Continues

Monday, February 27, 2012

Despite an apology from President Obama, protests and violence following the destruction of several Korans and other religious artifacts by U.S. troops have continued in Afghanistan and Pakistan. 30 people have been killed thus far, including four U.S. troops. As one of the most offensive possible acts, the unrest over this burning shows no signs of stopping.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Democracy in Pakistan

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Nafisa Hoodbhoy, former staff reporter at Dawn, Pakistan's leading English language newspaper, former teacher at University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Amherst College, and now author of Aboard the Democracy Train: A Journey Through Pakistan's Last Decade of Democracy, discusses the politics of the Afghanistan-Pakistan region in the post-9/11 era, and how ethnic violence and women's rights fit into Pakistan's democratic history.

You can see Nafisa Hoodbhoy in conversation with Professor Henry (Chip) Carey and Karen Frillman of WNYC tonight at McNally Jackson bookstore in NYC.

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The Takeaway

New NATO Report on Taliban

Wednesday, February 01, 2012

Our partner the BBC has gotten its hands on a secret NATO report on the state of the Taliban. It shows Pakistan's security services are directly assisting the Taliban in Afghanistan and know where senior Taliban leaders are hiding. Joining us now is Bilal Sarwary, correspondent for our partner the BBC.

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The Takeaway

Remembering Daniel Pearl

Wednesday, February 01, 2012

Ten years ago this week, Wall Street Journal South Asia bureau chief Daniel Pearl was abducted and killed by Pakistani militants. His grisly murder shocked the world, heralding the end of innocence for many foreign correspondents. It also became a rallying cry for those supporting the war on terror as well as those in Afghanistan and Iraq. But for those who actually knew Pearl, it was something else entirely.

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Transportation Nation

PHOTOS: Karachi Does Public Transportation With Style

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Hundreds of minibuses get commuters around Pakistan’s bustling port city Karachi.

Ladies ride in the front section of Karachi's minibuses. (Photo by Mansoor Khan)

Since there is no other viable means of public transportation, the buses get packed fast and can be risky to ride since they don’t stop for passengers to get on and off and riders often have to pile up on top of the buses if there's no space in the bus cabin. These turn many Karachi locals off. But the vibrant good looks of the buses coupled with the fact that they are made by local artisans make Karachi buses the coolest form of public transportation I’ve seen to date.

This bus, made in 2008, has seen a few trips. (Photo by Abbie Fentress Swanson)

Karachi's minibuses  take months to decorate before they hit the road. First they are painted a base color. Then artisans cut eye-catching red, orange, blue, green and yellow plastic reflector sheets (chamak patti) into shapes -- like hearts, diamonds and flowers -- into small pieces with scissors. The shapes are then made into patterns, pictures or natural scenes -- waterfalls, mountains and peacocks are popular -- and affixed onto tin sheets that cover the bus exteriors.

Popular motifs include peacocks and stars. (Photo by Umair Mohsin/Flickr CC)

The names of bus operators or artists who decorated the buses -- Brothers, Princ Khan, VIP -- are often found on the vehicles, as are eyes that look out at passengers coming from behind. Other decor, such as chains with amulets, dangle from the front and back bus bumpers. Icing on the cake is flags, tassels and strings of beads.

This 2001 bus is operated by Brothers. (Photo by Abbie Fentress Swanson)

After you've seen the buses by day, take a drive through Karachi at night: that's when tiny lights on the buses are all lit up.

The Karachi W11 by night. (Photo by Mansoor Khan)

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The Takeaway

When Fiction Becomes a Horrific Reality: Aatish Taseer's 'Noon'

Friday, January 06, 2012

We are accustomed to hearing about violence and instability in Pakistan, yet it remains a faraway place to most Americans. Yet what if Pakistan was home and its violence and uncertainty were part of the fabric of your life? And what if that violence one day claimed someone close to you? As a writer and as a Pakistani, Aatish Taseer has struggled all his life to understand his relationship with his country, with his ethnic homeland Punjab, and with his politically prominent father Salman Taseer, the governor of Pakistan's Punjab province. A year ago this week his father was assassinated just as he was finishing his first novel "Noon." 

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The Takeaway

The End of the US-Pakistan Security Partnership?

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Since a NATO airstrike on November 26 accidentally killed 24 Pakistani soldiers at two military check points along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, the United States has had a difficult time maintaining its already strained relationship with Pakistan. "We’ve closed the chapter on the post-9/11 period," an anonymous senior United States official was quoted telling The New York Times. "Pakistan has told us very clearly that they are re-evaluating the entire relationship." 

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The Takeaway

Friday Follow: Payroll Tax, US-Pakistan Relations, Iraq Terror Scandal

Friday, December 23, 2011

This week North Korean dictator Kim Jong-il died, a Pentagon investigation into airstrikes that killed 26 Pakistani soldiers heightened tensions between the U.S. and Pakistan, Countrywide was ordered to pay $355 million for discriminating against black and Latino borrowers, and a terrorism scandal in Iraq's second-highest office broke. 

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The Takeaway

Pentagon Report Says Both US and Pakistan to Blame in November's Deadly Airstrike

Friday, December 23, 2011

It's been a tumultuous year for U.S.-Pakistan relations. First came the arrest of a CIA contractor in Lahore who killed two Pakistani citizens, then the raid by U.S. special forces that ended in the death of Osama bin Laden. But relations hit a new low last month when a NATO air strike killed 26 Pakistani soldiers. A Pentagon report released Thursday says both countries share in the blame for the deadly attack, that Pakistani forces fired first.

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The Takeaway

US Admits Culpability in Deadly Pakistan Airstrike

Thursday, December 22, 2011

A military investigation has found that the U.S. is in part responsible for killing 24 Pakistani soldiers in an errant airstrike along the Afghanistan border on November 26. The report also blames Pakistan for firing on U.S. and Afghan troops, saying the joint team returned fire in self-defense. The findings come at a time of deep mistrust between the two strategic allies. Adam Entous, national security correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, reports on the latest developments.

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It's A Free Country ®

Podcast: Pakistani Immigrants Seek to Rebuild Relationship Between Countries

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Pakistani immigrants are keenly aware of the dangers posed by the latest crisis in U.S.-Pakistan relations. Ever since the November 26 NATO airstrike that killed at least 25 Pakistani soldiers near the border with Afghanistan, the relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan has been on a downward spiral.

In this ...

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The Takeaway

Dim Hopes for Afghanistan at Bonn Meeting

Monday, December 05, 2011

A crucial international conference on Afghanistan’s future began Monday in Bonn, Germany. Delegates from 100 nations are attempting to chart a long term course for the war-torn country, after international troops leave in 2014. But neighboring Pakistan, crucial to Afghanistan’s security, is boycotting the conference, following a NATO attack killed 24 Pakistani soldiers.

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The Takeaway

Al-Qaeda Claims Responsibility for Kidnapping of US Aid Worker

Friday, December 02, 2011

Warren Weinstein is a veteran aid worker who was kidnapped by armed men in Lahore almost four months ago. Ayman al-Zawahiri and the Pakistan branch of al-Qaeda have claimed responsibility for this, and created a list of demands for his release. Among them are the end of U.S. airstrikes in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen, as well as the release of members of Osama bin Laden's family. However, it remains unclear if al-Qaeda actually has Weinstein in their custody.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Is the GOP's Isolationism Here to Stay?

Friday, December 02, 2011

As a proud conservative, I am a firm believer in President Ronald Reagan’s famous 11 Commandment not to speak ill of a fellow Republican. At the same time, I’ve been mulling over a statement made by Texas Governor Rick Perry (R-TX) during a recent presidential debate that has ...

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