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Pakistan

The Takeaway

Chaos, Violence Erupts in Pakistan

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Pakistan is on the edge as chronic chaos, violence, and unrest erupts in Karachi. The Pakistani version of the Taliban has managed to shut down the international airport twice this week. Today insurgents, possibly with no Taliban affiliation, attacked an airport training facility.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Snowden's Lawyer Speaks Out, New Immigration Challenges Test System, Tea Party Support Slides

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

1. Wave of Immigration Tests Ill-Equipped System | 2. Chaos, Violence Erupt in Pakistan | 3. Tea Party Support Slides Among Republicans | 4. Majority Leader Eric Cantor and the GOP Face Off Against the Tea Party | 5. America's Police Departments See Influx of War Gear | 6. Snowden's ...

The Takeaway

The U.S. & Pakistan: An Uncertain Future

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

As the U.S. prepares to leave Afghanistan, the American relationship with Pakistan hangs in the balance. Christine Fair, a professor at Georgetown University, examines how the region will hold up when the last American troops leave.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Humaira Awais Shahid Fights for Women’s Rights in Pakistan

Friday, May 23, 2014

Humaira Awais Shahid tells how she became an advocate for the rights of women, girls, and the poor.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Improving Women's Rights in Pakistan, Improving Agriculture in America

Friday, May 23, 2014

On today’s show, we're re-airing some favorite recent interviews. Humaira Awais Shahid talks about becoming a prominent Muslim woman activist in Pakistan, and how Islamic values could become an agent for change. Classical historian James Romm looks at the dramatic life of Seneca, one of Ancient Rome’s best-known writers and philosophers. Edmund White talks about moving to Paris in 1983, and how he fell in love with the city and its culture during the 15 years he lived and wrote there. And we’ll find out how a few large companies control most of the country’s meat supply, and why that’s hurting both consumers and farmers alike.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Dexter Filkins: Covering War Distorts Everything

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

The New Yorker staff writer tells guest host Sarah Jessica Parker about his experiences covering war in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Humaira Awais Shahid, Advocate for Women’s Rights in Pakistan and Beyond

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Humaira Awais Shahid took on a job editing the “women’s section” of one of Pakistan’s leading Urdu newspapers in 2001, and she soon transformed it from celebrity gossip and fashion advice to an investigation of the true lives of Pakistani women. News of acid attacks on women, the trading of girls as currency in tribal disputes, and other abuses Shahid into an advocate for women’s rights. She tells how her commitment to women led her to a seat in the Provincial Assembly of the Punjab, where she fought to protect women, girls, and the poor. In her book Devotion and Defiance: My Journey in Love, Faith and Politics, she looks at how Islamic values and ethics might yet be a vehicle for progressive change in the developing world.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Against Blasphemy Laws

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Having been their victim, Shemeem Burney Abbas, associate professor of political science and gender studies at the State University of New York at Purchase College, and the author of Pakistan's Blasphemy Laws: From Islamic Empires to the Taliban(University of Texas Press, 2013) argues that blasphemy laws in Pakistan and other Islamic countries are politically motivated, not religious.

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The Takeaway

The Significance of Mehsud's Death

Monday, November 04, 2013

On Friday, US fired missiles killed Hakimullah Mehsud, the leader of the Pakistani Taliban, in what may be a huge development in the war against the Taliban in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Madiha Tahir is a documentary filmmaker whose film, "Wounds of Waziristan," looks at the impact of drone strikes close to the Afghanistan border. She discusses the significance of Mehsud's death.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Shahan Mufti on His 1,400-Year Family History

Monday, November 04, 2013

Journalist Shahan Mufti tells his family’s history, which he can trace back 1,400 years to the inner circle of the prophet Muhammad. He offers a history of Pakistan by using the stories of his ancestors, many of whom served as judges and jurists in Muslim sharia courts of South Asia for many centuries. The Faithful Scribe is more than a personal history—it reveals the deepest roots of Islamic civilization in Pakistan.

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The Takeaway

Memos Reveal Pakistani Officials Secretly Endorsed Drone Strikes

Thursday, October 24, 2013

For years Pakistani officials have denounced the U.S. drone program in Pakistan. But the Washington Post obtained diplomatic memos demonstrating that Pakistani officials secretly endorsed the U.S. drone program in their country. Joining The Takeaway to discuss these revelations is Akbar Ahmed, Chair of the Islamic Studies at American University and Pakistan’s former Ambassador to the U.K.

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Radiolab

Always, Always There

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Two short tales: One about bad guys in a fishing village in Pakistan, the other about good guys in Baghdad. And the question is posed: in the long arc of time, which side prevails, those with the impulse to take or those with the impulse to give?

 

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The Takeaway

Ex-Pakistani President Faces Murder Charges

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf has been indicted for the murder of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, who was assassinated in 2007. Joining us to discuss this is Akbar Ahmed, chair of Islamic studies at American University and Pakistan's former ambassador to the United Kingdom. Ahmed is author of the book "The Thistle and the Drone."

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The Takeaway

CIA Finally Confirms Role in 1953 Iranian Coup | New York City's Biggest Gun Bust | Every Taco Tells a Story

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

The Conflict in Egypt: A Proxy for Competing Ideologies in the Middle East | New York City's Biggest Gun Bust | CIA Finally Confirms Role in 1953 Iranian Coup | Ex-Pakistani President Faces Murder Charges | Every Taco Tells a Story | Texas & The Voting Rights Act | The Republican ...

The Takeaway

U.S. May End Drone Strikes in Pakistan

Monday, August 05, 2013

Secretary of State John Kerry explained in an interview with Pakistani television that the U.S. could end drone strikes in the country in the near future. But there are those who claim that the U.S. and Pakistan have both benefited from the use of drones. C. Christine Fair, Professor at the Center for Peace and Security Studies at Georgetown University, explains why.

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The Takeaway

Leaked Report Provides Details of Bin Laden's Life on the Run

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

A leaked Pakistani government report reveals what Pakistan did and did not know about Osama Bin Laden, and provides details of Bin Laden's life on the run. Akbar Ahmed is the chair of Islamic Studies at American University and Pakistan’s former Ambassador to the United Kingdom. He joins The Takeaway to discuss the report and what it could mean on a larger scale.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Publishing the Pentagon Papers; the novel The Son; Prosecuting Rape in Pakistan; the Last of the Doughboys

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

James Goodale, chief counsel for the New York Times when it published the Pentagon Papers, talks about the debate over whether publishing those documents was in the country's best interest. Philipp Meyer describes his new novel, The Son, set it Texas and spanning more than a century. We’ll find out about the challenges of prosecuting rape cases in Pakistan, the subject of the documentary “Outlawed in Pakistan.” And Richard Rubin discusses finding and interviewing find dozens of WWI veterans to capture their stories of the Great War before they died.

The Leonard Lopate Show

“Outlawed in Pakistan”

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Filmmakers Habiba Nosheen and Hilke Schellmann discuss their Frontline documentary “Outlawed in Pakistan,” about a 13-year-old Pakistani girl who accused four men of gang rape, risking her reputation, her education, and even her life. In Pakistan, women and girls who allege rape are often more strongly condemned than their alleged rapists. The film shines a light on Pakistan's flawed justice system—and find that those rare rape cases that do make it to court are often fraught with complications, from police non-cooperation to a systemic lack of forensic evidence. “Outlawed in Pakistan” airs Tuesday, May 28, 2013, at 10 p.m. on PBS.

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The Takeaway

Historic Election Marks Transition in Pakistan

Monday, May 13, 2013

This weekend saw historic elections in Pakistan. Despite the violence in the run-up to the elections, which saw regular bomb blasts and the kidnapping of the son of a former Prime Minister, Saturday's vote marked the first time the country has transitioned from one democratically elected government to another. Arif Rafiq, the writer behind the Pakistan Policy Blog and president of Vizier Consulting, LLC, describes what kind of coalition might emerge from this vote.

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The Takeaway

Local Perspectives on the Affordable Care Act, Historic Elections in Pakistan, Is American Liberalism Dead?

Monday, May 13, 2013

Local Perspectives on the Affordable Care Act | Historic Election Marks Transition in Pakistan | Affordable Care Act: Listeners Respond |The Death of American Liberalism? | Department Audit Reveals I.R.S. Targeted Tea Party Groups | The Human Element of Health Care