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Pakistan

The Takeaway

US May Shift Counterterrorism Efforts to Yemen

Thursday, August 26, 2010

The US may expand counterterrorism efforts in Yemen, to address a growing threat from al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula. The CIA now believes that al-Qaida's affiliate in Yemen may be more dangerous to U.S. interests than the much higher-profile group in Afghanistan and Pakistan. In the aftermath of the Fort Hood shooting, the attempted Christmas Day bombing, and with names like Anwar Al-Awlaki becoming part of the everyday conversation on terrorism, more and more voices are beginning to feel that the branch of terrorists operating from Yemen, known as al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, represents the largest terrorist threat to American interests and security. 


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The Takeaway

More Rain Exacerbates Pakistan Relief Efforts

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

More rain today added to logistical challenges facing aid and government workers trying to help tens of millions affected by the flooding. Heavy rains are in the forecast through Friday.

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The Takeaway

Growing Political Crisis in the Wake of Pakistan's Floods

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

The worst floods in more than 80 years have devastated Pakistan, causing widespread problems in the country and triggering worries about social unrest, food riots and a possible challenge to the government's rule. Speaking last weekend, Altaf Hussain, a powerful political leader and the head of the Muttahida Quami Movement called for patriotic generals to take steps toward martial law to oust Pakistan's president.

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The Takeaway

Pakistani Officials Captured Taliban Leader to Stop Peace Talks

Monday, August 23, 2010

In January, Pakistani officials arrested a top Taliban operational commander, Abdul Ghani Baradar. At the time Pakistan officials said they they had no idea who Baradar was when they arrested him and that they were surprised to find out that he was Taliban's second in command. However, Baradar was a key player in peace talks that were going on between the Taliban and the Afghan government. Foreign correspondent for The New York Times, Dexter Filkins broke the story and joins us with the details.

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The Takeaway

Ramadan Relief Efforts for Pakistan Flood Victims

Monday, August 23, 2010

Devastating flooding in Pakistan continued over the weekend as the Indus River surged south and authorities raised the spectre of easily communicable waterborne diseases passing among the millions of people displaced from their homes.

The flooding is taking place during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. It's a time when, along with prayer and fasting, Muslims donate to various charities. We're taking a look at how Ramadan is being observed in Pakistan and here at home where Muslim communities are rallying to raise donations.  

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The Takeaway

US Increases Humanitarian Military Presence in Pakistan

Friday, August 20, 2010

To support relief efforts in Pakistan, the United States currently has 18 military and civilian aircraft in the country and three based in Afghanistan. American helicopters have evacuated nearly 6,000 people and delivered more than 717,000 pounds of relief supplies. And Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.), the chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has just announced the U.S. will increase aid to Pakistan to $150 million.

But the context for the American military presence in Pakistan is more complicated than simply delivering humanitarian aid. Pakistan is home to militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba, whose offshoot organizations have already become a visible force during this crisis. The Pakistani Taliban is already believed to be behind two attacks against security forces in Peshawar since the start of the flooding.

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The Takeaway

Will Pakistan's Relief Aid Prevent Destabilization?

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

20 million people have been affected by the floods in Pakistan in the past three weeks, in what some say is the worst natural catastrophe in recent history. However, even with the United Nations calling for $459 million for immediate relief efforts, aid assistance is still only trickling in. Whether it is "compassion fatigue," lack of funds or a distrust in the Pakistani government's transparency – the real question is, will a failure to act now have greater foreign policy implications for the future stability of the region?

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The Takeaway

Pakistan Aid Gap May Offer US an Opportunity to Restore Relations

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Pakistan’s floods are producing some mind-boggling numbers: 3.5 million children are at risk of disease, and roughly one-fifth of the country is under water. 20 million people have been displaced from their homes by the ongoing deluge.   

And some more disturbing numbers: the UN has asked for $460 million in emergency aid. To date, donor nations have only pledged 35 percent of that amount. A little less than half the donations - roughly $76 million - has come from the United States.

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The Takeaway

Aid Workers Face Challenges in Responding to Pakistan Floods

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

The U.N. estimates that as many as 20 million people have been affected by the massive flooding in Pakistan. People have lost their homes and their land, and there'a a high risk of water-born illnessess. Children are especially affected by illnesses like eye infections, scabies and diarrhea. Aid workers are faced with a huge job as they try to help the victims.

Lucia Ennis regional director for Asia at the aid organization Concern Worldwide describes the challenges of getting food and supplies to 250,000 victims of the floods in Pakistan, as waters spread to the south. She says the most important thing is to get clean water and food to the victims.

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The Takeaway

In Flooded Pakistan, BBC Radio Offers 'Lifeline'

Monday, August 16, 2010

One fifth of Pakistan is underwater, and many of the country's residents — reportedly as many as 400,000 — continue to be threatened by the worst flooding in nearly a century. Some of the hardest hit are those in the country's more remote regions, where aid and even information is difficult to deliver. Our partner the BBC has offered a radio service called "Lifeline" that is trying to help reach Pakistanis, offering a call-in for people who need important aid information, and also giving them a forum for telling their own story during the disaster.

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The Takeaway

Amidst Flooding Wreckage, Militants Increase Presence

Thursday, August 12, 2010

In Pakistan almost a third of the country is under water. Flood victims are demanding help and many are saying the government has been too slow to respond. the United Nations has launched a $460 million international appeal to help the victims. However, a new political problem is emerging as groups with militant ties are stepping in to help local residents, and even telling locals not to accept help from outside sources. Issam Ahmed, reporter for the Christian Science Monitor has been covering the flooding. He describes the scope of the disaster and squalid conditions for those affected.

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WQXR News

Flooding, Landslides Wreak Havoc in Asia

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Bad weather continues to hamper relief efforts.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Pakistani Flood Aid

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Adam Ellick, New York Times correspondent in Pakistan, talks about the operations on the ground in Pakistan, the return of President Zardari to the country, and the groups offering aid during the disaster. Plus, Yousef Abdallah, Northeast Regional Manager of Islamic Relief USA, a group working with staff on the ground in Pakistan to provide aid to those displaced by the flood, discusses local efforts to supply relief to Pakistanis affected by the flood.

To donate to groups helping provide aid to Pakistanis affected by the flood, you can contact Islamic Relief USA at (888) 479-4968 or go  through their website. The EDHI Foundation is also taking donations, as is the Red Cross

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The Takeaway

What This Summer's Natural Disasters Mean for Planet Earth

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

The number of people affected by the massive flooding in Pakistan over the past week is larger than the combined total of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Flash floods have hit neighboring Kashmir, killing at least 85 people, and China where more than 1,300 people are feared missing. In Europe, a heat wave has led to the deaths of 5,000 people, and in Russia drought and wildfires are ravaging the country.

Are all these simultaneous natural disasters this summer just a big coincidence, or is it a harbinger of something more serious for Planet Earth? Environmentalist Bill McKibben connects the dots and finds out how much it has to do with global warming.

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The Takeaway

For US, a Diplomatic Opportunity in Sending Pakistan Flood Relief

Thursday, August 05, 2010

Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years has killed hundreds and displaced what's estimated to be more than a million people. The United States has pledged $10 million in relief, in addition to providing helicopters and other critical supplies to Pakistan. But is this enough relief to matter?

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The Takeaway

Severe Flooding Continues in Pakistan

Wednesday, August 04, 2010

As the monsoons keep coming, flooding continues to destroy infrastructure and cause panic in Pakistan. Lyse Doucet, BBC correspondent in Islamabad describes the scene. She says that people have been walking for days in "oceans of water" looking for shelter from the rain and that conditions are miserable and unsanitary. 

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WQXR News

Attackers Execute 45 in Revenge Attacks in Pakistan

Tuesday, August 03, 2010

Tuesday's killings follow the assassination of a member of the country's ruling Muttahida Qaumi Movement party on Monday.

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WQXR News

Cholera Epidemic Feared in Pakistan Floods

Monday, August 02, 2010

Medical teams were sent to northwest Pakistan on Monday to be on hand for a possible cholera epidemic triggered by the district's heavy monsoon rains. The floods have killed some 1,200 people and displaced 2 million from their homes.

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The Takeaway

More Than 1000 Killed in Pakistan Flooding

Monday, August 02, 2010

The worst flooding in Pakistan's history has killed over a thousand people in a volatile region. Issam Ahmed, reporter for the Christian Science Monitor, is in Lahore, Pakistan. He has the latest details on the spill and the country's greatest needs as two million people flee their homes.

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WQXR News

Deadly Floods Wreak Havoc in Pakistan

Friday, July 30, 2010

Hundreds of people have been killed following days of heavy flooding in Pakistan.

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