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Oud

New Sounds

Near East/South Asian Connections

Monday, December 22, 2014

For this New Sounds, listen to music that mixes together the traditions of South Asia and the middle East and just as far west as Turkey. Listen to Nashaz, Kayhan Kalhor, and more.

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New Sounds

Lutes Around the World

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Listen to music from members of the lute family on this New Sounds show. These instruments can be found in most of the world’s tradition from the Central Asian tanbur, to the Greek bouzouki, to the Russian balalaika, and the Chinese pipa. But, in true New Sounds fashion, there will be some mixing up of these traditions of the lutes around the world.  Hear music from the Afghan-American rubab master Quraishi, whose family lineage is deep with musicians and instrument makers. Listen to his original work, “Wardagi” – in which he blends three traditional folk songs that his father often sang while playing the rubab, songs which are unique to the style of playing that originates from his father’s home province of Wardak.  Quraishi performs live at 1PM on Sunday August 3, as part of Lincoln Center Out-of-Doors.  FREE.

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New Sounds

A Musical Babel

Monday, June 09, 2014

Unlikely combinations of cultures and traditional musics give a global perspective on this New Sounds program.  Listen to a musical portrayal of an imaginary Syria, "Syriana." It's a London-based ensemble with musicians from Syria and parts of the Near East, featuring the Pan-Arab Strings of Damascus.  There's also music by sax player Uri Gurvich from his forthcoming record, “BabEl,” a mixture of oud  and North African percussion with some saxophone, piano, bass and drums.

 

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New Sounds

New Music for Arab Lute

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Music for Arab lutes dominates this New Sounds program. Listen to Kabul-stylings of the Afghan rubâb player Homayun Sakhi, who is heir to a musical lineage steeped in the North Indian classical tradition. Also, there’s “shiny” oud music by a trio of brothers, Le Trio Joubran, sons in a long line of a family of luthiers, in this case, oud-crafters. Their music willfully plays with dividing lines between music of the classical Arab world and Indian classical music, Spanish flamenco, and American jazz. Plus, there’s spacious and absorbing trio work from the Tunisian oud master Anouar Brahem, who is joined by Jean-Louis Matinier on accordion and François Couturier on piano.

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New Sounds

Near East/South Asian Connections

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

For this New Sounds, listen to music that mixes together the traditions of South Asia and the middle East and just as far west as Turkey.  Brooklyn-based Nashaz brings the Arab classical music influence to their oud-led jazz outfit, playing with scale, “Hijaz.” (Leader and oud player Brian Prunka also runs an Arabic jazz blog, as well as an oud site, for delving into the all the music theory.)  Also, Niyaz, the Montreal-based Iranian-American group, brings the Persian influence, and features hammered dulcimer.

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New Sounds

A Musical Babel (Special Podcast)

Monday, April 29, 2013

WNYC

Unlikely combinations of cultures and traditional musics give a global perspective on this New Sounds program.  Listen to a musical portrayal of an imaginary Syria, "Syriana." It's a London-based ensemble with musicians from Syria and parts of the Near East, featuring the Pan-Arab Strings of Damascus.  There's also music by sax player Uri Gurvich from his forthcoming record, “BabEl,” a mixture of oud  and North African percussion with some saxophone, piano, bass and drums.

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New Sounds

A Musical Babel

Friday, March 08, 2013

Unlikely combinations of cultures and traditional musics give a global perspective on this New Sounds program.  Listen to a musical portrayal of an imaginary Syria, "Syriana." It's a London-based ensemble with musicians from Syria and parts of the Near East, featuring the Pan-Arab Strings of Damascus.  There's also music by sax player Uri Gurvich from his forthcoming record, “BabEl,” a mixture of oud  and North African percussion with some saxophone, piano, bass and drums.

 

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New Sounds

Unusual Collaborations

Sunday, January 27, 2013

On this New Sounds program, hear music from Iraqi oud master Rahim AlHaj, in collaboration with accordion virtuoso Guy Klucevsek, from a fascinating double album of cross-cultural collaborations, called “Little Earth.”  AlHaj studied with Munir Bashir, but was also trained in Western classical music, and on this global effort was joined by folks as diverse as Cape Verde’s Maria de Barros, Bill Frisell, Peter Buck, and Mali’s Yacouba Sissoko.

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New Sounds

Unusual Collaborations

Thursday, January 19, 2012

On this New Sounds program, hear music from Iraqi oud master Rahim AlHaj, in collaboration with accordion virtuoso Guy Klucevsek, from a fascinating double album of cross-cultural collaborations, called “Little Earth.”  AlHaj studied with Munir Bashir, but was also trained in Western classical music, and on this global effort was joined by folks as diverse as Cape Verde’s Maria de Barros, Bill Frisell, Peter Buck, and Mali’s Yacouba Sissoko.

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New Sounds

Unusual Collaborations (Weekly Podcast)

Friday, October 15, 2010

WNYC

On this New Sounds program, hear music from Iraqi oud master Rahim AlHaj, in collaboration with accordion virtuoso Guy Klucevsek, from a fascinating double album of cross-cultural collaborations, called “Little Earth.”  AlHaj studied with Munir Bashir, but was also trained in Western classical music, and on this global effort was joined by folks as diverse as Cape Verde’s Maria de Barros, Bill Frisell, Peter Buck, and Mali’s Yacouba Sissoko.

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New Sounds

Unusual Collaborations

Monday, October 04, 2010

On this New Sounds program, hear music from Iraqi oud master Rahim AlHaj, in collaboration with accordion virtuoso Guy Klucevsek, from a fascinating double album of cross-cultural collaborations, called “Little Earth.”  AlHaj studied with Munir Bashir, but was also trained in Western classical music, and on this global effort was joined by folks as diverse as Cape Verde’s Maria de Barros, Bill Frisell, Peter Buck, and Mali’s Yacouba Sissoko. 

 

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