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Osama Bin Laden Death

The Takeaway

'We Did Not Invite Osama Bin Laden to Pakistan'

Monday, May 09, 2011

Pakistan's Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani spoke Monday in response to the killing of Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. He defended his government in its claims that they did not know that Osama bin Laden was in the country, strongly denying that there had been any collusion between Pakistan and al-Qaida to shelter bin Laden. The New York Times' Carlotta Gall reports from Islamabad.

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The Takeaway

Embarrassed, Pakistanis Deny Bin Laden Was in Their Country

Monday, May 09, 2011

There's a growing sense of anger in Pakistan over the bin Laden killing as well as embarrassment that he was hiding in their country. Did the Pakistani government know that he was there? One Abbottabad resident says that their city was a peaceful one, which explains much of the resentment. The BBC's Aleem Maqbool reports.

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The Takeaway

What is Osama Bin Laden's Legacy?

Monday, May 09, 2011

The recent killing of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden ended the reign of the most wanted criminal on the planet. However, it hasn't put an end his importance as an historical figure. Due to his long list of crimes and efforts to spread a radical ideology and message of global jihad, bin Laden seems destined to become one of history's most notorious criminals. But how will history books write the bin Laden chapters?

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The Takeaway

Tom Ridge on Bin Laden Intel

Monday, May 09, 2011

Over two terabytes of information have been extracted from Osama bin Laden's hard drives, taken during the raid on his compound last Sunday. According to Tom Donilon, President Obama's national security adviser, the amount of information could fill a small college library. We talk with Tom Ridge, former head of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; former governor of Pennsylvania; and current president and CEO of Ridge Global, an international security and risk management firm based in Washington, D.C., about the impact that the new intel will have on our national security and foreign policy.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Bin Laden, Economy, Floods

Monday, May 09, 2011

A week ago, Osama bin Laden was found and killed by American special forces in Pakistan. A hefty amount of information has been retrieved from the compound, enough information to fill a "small college library," according to Tom Donilon, President Obama's National Security Adviser. A number of videos of Osama bin Laden were released to the public, including one, which shows the late terrorist watching videos of himself on a small television. Callie Crossley, host of "The Callie Crossley Show" on WGBH in Boston, looks at what all this intelligence will tell us about bin Laden, and how this affects the U.S. role in Afghanistan.

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The Takeaway

President Obama Talks Osama Death on '60 Minutes'

Monday, May 09, 2011

President Obama appeared on CBS's "60 Minutes" Sunday night to talk about what transpired leading up to the raid of Osama bin Laden's compound and his subsequent death. Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington correspondent responds to President Obama's fascinating explanation of the "decision points" that were part of the raid.

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It's A Free Blog

There's No Way bin Laden's Alive. How Do we Know? DNA

Friday, May 06, 2011

WNYC

When President Obama made the announcement this week that U.S. Navy Seals had killed Osama bin Laden, the first question everyone asked was, How can he be so sure?

The answer: DNA.

As a criminal defense attorney, legal analyst and journalist who covered the innocence movement from its inception, I ...

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The Takeaway

Pakistan Warning: Another Covert Op Could Worsen Relations

Friday, May 06, 2011

Questions about the covert U.S. mission in Abbottabad, Pakistan are leading to new found frustrations in the already rocky relationship between the two countries. Some American lawmakers are skeptical that the Pakistani intelligence was unaware that Osama bin Laden was hiding just an hour’s drive from the capital city of Islamabad. Meanwhile, Pakistani officials say they will not tolerate a future incident where the U.S. military engages in a covert operation in Pakistan without the government’s knowledge. What's next in the diplomatic game?

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It's A Free Country ®

US-Pakistan - What's Next?

Friday, May 06, 2011

WNYC
They believe that they have to maintain and show toughness, and this is one way that they’re seeking to do that. The removal of US military forces from Pakistan… won’t do anything with respect to the kind of operations that were undertaken against bin Laden, but it gets at this underlying defensiveness.

Daniel Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Al-Qaida Confirms Bin Laden's Death

Friday, May 06, 2011

Al-Qaida confirmed the death of Osama bin Laden in an Internet statement posted on militant websites. The statement warns of retaliation, saying bin Laden's death "will not go in vain" and is signed by the general leadership of the group. The organization is not centralized, does not trust the international media, and have difficulties communicating with each other so this acknowledgment can serve to certify the death and allow the organization to move on. Michael Semple, fellow at The Carr Center for Human Rights at the Harvard Kennedy School analyzes al-Qaida's future and what the U.S. government is hoping to find in the data pulled from Osama bin Laden's computers.

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The Takeaway

Proof is in the Hard Drives: Bin Laden's Terror Tech

Friday, May 06, 2011

After poring over documents and hard drives taken out of the compound in Abbottabad where bin Laden was killed, intelligence analysts have surmised that the al-Qaida leader was consistently in touch with the terrorist network he helped create, and still intimately involved in plotting more attacks. A story in The New York Times details the data found and C.I.A. surveillance conducted before the mission to take out bin Laden was completed. We're joined by Scott Shane, a New York Times reporter who worked on the story. 

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The Takeaway

Did US Overstep Legal Bounds in Bin Laden Mission?

Friday, May 06, 2011

On Thursday, the head of Pakistan’s army, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani said that he would not tolerate future covert missions by the United States within his borders. Does that mean that the U.S. has overstretched its reach in the war against al-Qaida? That's the question international law experts have been addressing since Monday's covert operation, which ended with the death of former al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden.

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WNYC News

Look | President Obama Honors Sept 11 Victims at Ground Zero

Thursday, May 05, 2011

PHOTOS. Take a look at President Barack Obama's visit to Ground Zero to honor the victims of September 11, 2001, following the killing of Osama bin Laden in Pakistan this week.

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It's A Free Country ®

Do You Want the Bin Laden Photos Released?

Thursday, May 05, 2011

WNYC
As an American I really want to see the image… as a Pakistani, I wouldn’t want the image up, because I feel like there will always be retaliation.

A Pakistani-American caller on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Nicholas Kristof on the Ripple Effect of Osama Bin Laden's Death

Thursday, May 05, 2011

The ripple effect of Osama bin Laden’s death is already being felt. In Yemen, an al-Qaida stronghold, at least 10 people were killed and more than 20 injured when gunmen believed to be al-Qaida members attacked two security patrols in the southern province of Abyan. But in Afghanistan, analysts believe that Osama bin Laden's death may lead the Taliban to finally sever their ties to al-Qaida — a move the Obama Administration and President Hamid Karzai’s regime have demanded as a condition for opening up negotiations with insurgents.

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The Takeaway

Naming Osama Bin Laden's Successor

Thursday, May 05, 2011

Speculation continues regarding the future of al-Qaida’s leadership following the killing of its leader Osama bin Laden. There are rules governing who is next in line, explains Leah Farrall. Farrall is the former Senior Counter-Terrorism Analyst for the Australian Federal Police and currently the author of the blog, All Things Counter-Terrorism. In a recent article for Foreign Policy magazine, she writes that "like any good corporation, the terror network has a strict series of rules and regulations it must adhere to in naming a successor. Rules that provide insight into how any future power struggles may play out." And these rules point to number two leader Ayman al-Zawahiri.

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The Takeaway

Pakistanis Want Proof of Bin Laden's Death

Thursday, May 05, 2011

BBC reporter Owen Bennett Jones is in Karachi, Pakistan talking to locals about what they think of Osama bin Laden's death. Many people, he says, don't believe that he has been killed and want more proof. "Once it is proved, then we will accept that Osama has died," says one Karachi resident.

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The Takeaway

Why Didn't Pakistan Know Bin Laden Was There?

Thursday, May 05, 2011

Pakistanis are obsessed with the question of why no one knew that Osama bin Laden was living in their country, just north of the capital. "There is a sense of embarrassment that it wasn't the Pakistani forces that killed Osama bin Laden, but that it was Americans," says the BBC's Aleem Maqbool. There is also a sense that the Pakistani authorities must have known that he was there, while at the same time, residents want proof that the al-Qaida leader is dead.

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The Takeaway

Game Changer: What the Osama Mission Means for al-Qaida and US Strategies

Thursday, May 05, 2011

Instead of a full-on military offensive in Pakistan, Osama bin Laden was taken out by an elite troop of Navy SEALs in a covert operation. It comes as little surprise that the House Armed Services subcommittee on emerging threats and capabilities approved $10.5 billion for Special Operations Command and the Navy SEALs in the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1. This is about a 7 percent increase over this year. At the same time, the death of Osama bin Laden, who was the driving force behind al-Qaida's large scale attacks, could force the terrorist group to change strategy as well.

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The Takeaway

White House to Withhold Osama bin Laden Photos

Thursday, May 05, 2011

The White House has announced that it will not release photos of Osama bin Laden’s death. Quoting the transcript of President Obama’s upcoming interview with 60 Minutes, set to air this Sunday, White House Spokesperson Jay Carney told reporters that, “It is important for us to make sure that very graphic photos of somebody who was shot in the head are not floating around as an incitement to further violence or as a propaganda tool.” Some very graphic photos from the raid have already been published by The Guardian. Is the release of graphic photos a good idea? 

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