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Olympics 2014

WQXR Blog

Violinist Vanessa-Mae Banned From Skiing Over Fixed Olympic Qualifiers

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Violinist Vanessa-Mae was banned from competitive skiing for four years on Tuesday for taking part in races that were fixed to allow her to qualify for the Sochi Olympics.
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WQXR Blog

Violinist Vanessa Mae's Pre-Sochi Ski Results Rigged, Say Officials

Friday, July 11, 2014

Four Slovenian ski officials were suspended Friday for allegedly rigging the results of pop violinist Vanessa-Mae to help her qualify for the Winter Olympics in Sochi.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

David Remnick Returns from Sochi

Monday, February 24, 2014

The Winter Olympics are over, but the geopolitical conversation about Russia continues. New Yorker editor David Remnick, who was in Sochi doing commentary for NBC, discusses the games, Russian politics, the latest from Ukraine, and more.

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WQXR Blog

Photos: Classical Musicians in the Winter Olympics Closing Ceremony

Sunday, February 23, 2014

The pianist Denis Matsuev, violist Yuri Bashmet, soprano Sumi Jo and conductor Valery Gergiev were among the performers in the Olympics closing ceremony.

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The Takeaway

A Peek at the Final Weekend of the Olympics

Friday, February 21, 2014

The 2014 Winter Olympics is wrapping up, but there's still plenty of excitement to be had. From the men's ice hockey final to the four-man bobsleigh race, the final weekend of the Winter Games is upon us and there are some real surprises and spectacular events to watch. Mary Pilon, sports reporter for our partner The New York Times, has been reporting from Sochi and fills us in on the home stretch of the Winter Olympics. 

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Soundcheck

Podcast: The Olympics Used To Have An Arts Competition; Take A Beatles Quiz; Helen Sung Plays Live

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

In this episode: Dr. Bill Guegold, Olympics music historian, talks about the history of the grand musical themes that we Americans associate with the games; the long-extinct Olympic arts competitions that used to award medals to composers; the Russian Police Choir; and more.

Then: All this week, Soundcheck is asking you to pick a side: The Beatles or The Rolling Stones? (Make your case in the comments here, on Twitter at @Soundcheck or leave a voicemail at 866-939-1612.) But no matter your loyalty, everyone can participate in our Beatles chart quiz, devised by writer Chris Molanphy. Given a pair of classic Fab Four songs, pick the one that charted higher in the U.S.

And: Pianist Helen Sung’s story is a tale of two genres: classical and jazz. Growing up in Texas, she studied classical piano – and went to college intending to become a concert pianist. But it was a Harry Connick Jr. concert, of all things, that opened her eyes and her ears to jazz – and her path took a dramatic turn. Helen recently made her major label debut with her new release called Anthem For A New Day, and we hear some of it live.

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WNYC News

New Yorker Bests Bode in Sochi

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Another member of Team NYC makes it to the medal stand.

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The Takeaway

How Do They Do That? Inside the Physics of The 2014 Winter Olympic Games

Friday, February 14, 2014

The Winter Olympics is a spectacular combination of low temperature chemistry, physics, athletics, pure guts, and absolute beauty and grace. Beyond the costumes, the equipment and the music, we wanted to find out just how Olympic athletes do what they do. So we're pleased to introduce our series, "How Do They Do That?" Here we explore the physics of the Sochi Games. Our friend Eric Goff is the chair of the physics department at Lynchburg College and author of "Gold Medal Physics: The Science of Sports." He explains how the athletes flip, fly and hit the ice at high speeds.

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On The Media

Behind the Scandal of "Japan's Beethoven"

Friday, February 14, 2014

This week Japanese Olympic figure skater, Daisuke Takahashi, found himself in the midst of national scandal, through no fault of his own. Takahashi skated his short program to a piece of music that had been initially attributed to Mamoru Samuragochi, known as "Japan's Beethoven," who was recently revealed to be neither a composer, nor possibly even deaf. Bob talks with Roland Kelts, author of JapanAmerica, about the revelations and the Japanese media's reaction to them.

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Gabfest Radio

How Have the Olympics Changed Russia's Reputation?

Friday, February 14, 2014

On this edition of Gabfest Radio, panelists explore the "Hillary Papers," AOL CEO Tim Armstrong's big mistake, the cultural response to the new Lego Movie, and an update on how Russia's global reputation is faring in light of the Sochi Olympics.

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Studio 360

Skating in Sochi: Music Gets Low Scores

Friday, February 14, 2014

As the Olympic figure skaters in Sochi push the boundaries of what’s physically possible on ice, the music they use in competition remains stuck in a deep rut: a narrow band of Romantic chestnuts, with the occasional John Williams score and orchestrated rock medley ...

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WNYC News

What It's Like To Fly Down Ice At 85 MPH

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

WNYC

At speeds of 85 miles an hour, it’ll take Matthew Mortensen and his luge partner a matter of seconds to get down the course on Wednesday. But it took the Long Island native years of work and sacrifice to make it to Sochi.

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Features

The Best Olympic Moments So Far

Monday, February 10, 2014

Dancing bobsledders, skaters throwing shade and all the hats you can stomach. Here's a list to catch you up on all the most important things you've missed so far.

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The Takeaway

Why Romance Novels Sell | How Do They Do That? Olympic Curling and Speed Skating | 100 Years of the Harmonica

Monday, February 10, 2014

Do Wealthy Philanthropists Make a Difference? | How Do They Do That? Olympic Curling | How Do They Do That? Olympic Ice | Humanitarian Cease-fire in Syria | 100 Years of the Harmonica | Why Romance Novels Sell

The Takeaway

How They Do That: Curling

Monday, February 10, 2014

The 2014 Sochi Olympics are in full swing, and today The Takeaway kicks off its series, "How Do They Do That?," on the scientific dynamics behind the winter games. All week, Eric Goff, physics professor at Lynchburg College and author of "Gold Medal Physics: The Science of Sports," will serve as The Takeaway's Olympic physicist, explaining the physics that push humans to their most extreme limits. Today, Goff looks at the physics behind curling with Brady Clark, reigning national curling champion.

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WQXR Features

Anna Netrebko Performs at the Olympics Opening Ceremony

Friday, February 07, 2014

Ready or not, Russia kicked off the Winter Olympics on Friday with a sumptous historical pageant scored to a number of the country’s great composers.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Who to Watch In Sochi: A Crowdsourced Guide to the Olympics

Thursday, February 06, 2014

We're building a listener-powered guide for who to watch at the Sochi Olympics, starting with Friday's opening ceremonies. If you have a favorite athlete, from any country, tell us why you're rooting for them and why others should care too. Mike Pesca, NPR sports correspondent and panelist on Slate's Hang Up and Listen, helps take you suggestions and discusses his favorite story lines.

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The Takeaway

Rep. Keating: Intelligence Sharing With Russia 'Walled Off'

Thursday, February 06, 2014

One day away from the opening ceremonies at the 2014 olympics and many still wonder: is Sochi safe? President Barack Obama says Americans are fine to go to the games. But Representative Bill Keating (D-MA) is less than sure. He explains his concerns over the upcoming games from the lack of information sharing between the US and Russia to the limited privacy from the Russian government.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

These Tweets Do Not Inspire Much Confidence About Sochi

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

As members of the media arrive in Sochi for the Olympics, they are finding unfinished buildings, open pot-holes -- not to mention hotel rooms without doorknobs. The Brian Lehrer Show checks in with a reporter in Sochi for some context.

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Conducting Business

Russia's Classical Stars Expected at Sochi Olympics Opening Ceremony

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Details have emerged about the musical lineup in the Winter Olympics opening ceremony. Russian music historian Simon Morrison gives us some context.

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