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Occupy Wall Street

The Empire

Occupy Wall Street: Just what Bloomberg doesn't need

Monday, October 24, 2011

Courtesy of the mayors office

WNYC's political analyst Joyce Purnick has a new piece up on our billionaire mayor's predicament with those pesky protesters down in Zuccotti Park. As Purnick points out, Bloomberg might be rethinking that third term right about...now.

The Occupy Wall Street protest is a headache for him. The world is watching and he is the man in charge of the city. If he antagonizes the protesters, he could wind up with a riot on his hands. If he lets them continue to protest, he looks weak and indecisive.

There is no simple solution, as the mayor said himself when he noted recently on his WOR radio show that "it's just not so easy; you can't just walk in and say, 'Hey, you're outta here.' " And even if the city did eject the protesters, he asked, where would they go then, since they do not appear inclined to head home. To Union Square? The Great Lawn in Central Park? The Sheep Meadow?

Of course, this is just another turn in the no-good, rotten, miserable, stupid year for the mayor. From snowstorms to Goldsmithgate, Cathy Black to John Haggerty, the mayor's third term has so far been riddled with embarrassing episodes that question his effectiveness as a mayor.

And now these kids protesting Wall Street.

The Occupy Wall Street protesters live in an alternate universe, which leaves the mayor where no leader wants to be: looking for a way to resolve a very volatile situation that is playing out in the public eye. Maybe he will be lucky and nature — the approach of a New York winter — will help the mayor out.

I'm sure President Lyndon Johnson felt the same way in 1970, but there's nothing that suggests the issues the protesters are raising--income inequality, disillusionment with politics, unemployment--are going away any time soon. Why would the protesters?

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It's A Free Country ®

What do Iraq and Wall St. Mean for 2012?

Monday, October 24, 2011

Republicans just sort of rolled [the Iraq withdrawal] into the way they've been talking about Obama: That he's been campaigning rather than governing, suggesting that this was political as opposed to on the advice of military leaders.

—It's A Free Country political peporter Anna Sale on The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [6]

WNYC News

Young, Low-Earning Independents Make Up Majority of Online Protest Traffic: Survey

Saturday, October 22, 2011

Visitors to the Occupy Wall Street website tend to be young, identified as Independents and make less than $50,000 a year, according to a recent unscientific survey conducted in collaboration with the group’s organizers.

Comments [1]

On The Media

Word Watch: Occupy

Friday, October 21, 2011

As the Occupy Wall Street protests spread around the world, they have changed the meaning and usage of the word "Occupy." Ben Zimmer, executive producer of the Visual Thesaurus and former "On Language" columnist for the New York Times, tracks how the word's meaning has shifted over just the last month.

Nicolas Jaar – "Problems with the Sun"

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The Empire

Cuomo receives award at HuffPo's 'Occupy SoHo'

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Update: Photo slideshow added at the bottom.

Occupy Wall St protesters outside the awards ceremony (Colby Hamilton / WNYC)

It was supposed to be a celebratory evening for Governor Andrew Cuomo. The liberal news site The Huffington Post was presenting the governor with its 2011 "Game Changer of the Year" award for his successful campaign to legalize same-sex marriage in New York.

Magazine cover celebrities and newsmakers lined up for pictures on the carpet at the entrance. Glasses of champagne were handed out to hundreds on hand celebrating the governor and 99 other leaders' work on various social, political and business fronts.

During his remarks, Cuomo spoke out against the death penalty, up for a woman's right to choose, and about the inevitable future of legalized same-sex marriage "from coast to coast."

But the other 99 -- the Occupy Wall Street "99 percent" protesters who'd shown up outside -- had a different set of talking point. The crowd of about 150 was mostly young, grungy and remarkably disciplined. They made up chants decrying the governor's support for hydrofracking and refusal to extend taxes on upper income earners.

After some initial back-and-forth with the police, the protesters agreed to move their picket across the street. They were violating a permit the Huffington Post party organizers had for use of the sidewalk.

Shortly after Cuomo's remarks some mid-level celebrity in sequence and high-heels ran into the middle of the street. A gaggle of dutiful photographers followed, flashes blowing. Traffic was forced to stop for the impromptu photo shoot.

The protesters, dimly lit by the cameras, continued to protest the governor who'd already left out the back.

Check out a photo slideshow of the event after the jump.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Privately Owned Public Spaces

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

As the Occupy Wall Street protests continue, Yolanne Almanzar, reporter for The New York World, discusses a new project about privately owned public spaces like Zucotti Park, and a crowdsourcing project where you help find out how public these public spaces are. She's joined by Jerold Kayden, professor of urban planning and design at Harvard and author of Privately Owned Public Space: The New York City Experience, who explains why privately owned public spaces exist and how they differ from city- and state-owned public parks.

New Project!: Help Us Map and Report on NYC's Privately Owned Public Spaces

 

Comments [24]

The Takeaway

Occupy Wall Street and Free Speech

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Does the right to protest include the right to set up camp in downtown Manhattan? When it comes to Occupy Wall Street and protesters in Zuccotti Park, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg doesn't think so. "The Constitution doesn’t protect tents," he said at a news conference earlier this week in Queens. "It protects speech and assembly." Mayor Bloomberg also suggested that those exercising a "right to be silent" might be having their rights trampled by the constant noise coming from the demonstrations in their tent city. 

Comments [8]

The Brian Lehrer Show

POPS Report: Tell Us About New York City's Privately-Owned Public Spaces

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

WNYC's Brian Leher Show and The New York World are collaborating on a project to map and report on New York City's Privately-Owned Public Spaces, aka POPS. We want to figure out how public these public spaces really are. Through zoning incentives, New York's city planners have encouraged private builders to include public spaces in their developments. Many are in active public use, but others are hard to find, under heavy surveillance, or essentially inaccessible.

With the Occupy Wall Street encampment in Zuccotti Park drawing attention to the regulations and usage of these spaces, we want you to tell us about the POPS in your life. Whether it's parks, plazas, atriums or fountains, find all of NYC's POPS on the map below, then use the form to report on your experience.

Here's How -- Deadline for Submissions is November 9th!

1) Find your space on the map below. You can zoom in to different parts of the city, and click on a particular space to see information such as the owner, the boundaries, and the total area.

2) In the pop-up menu you'll also see a Site ID - a unique ID we've assigned to each space.

3) If you want to report on a particular space, enter the shortcode in the form below and tell us about your experience!

4) That's it! Read some of the response highlights here, and we'll follow up online and on-air in the coming weeks.

If you're on Twitter, you can tweet photos with the hashtag #privatepublic and the name or site ID code for your location.

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WQXR Blog

Granny Protesters Stage Vigil at Lincoln Center

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

About 125 protesters led by an anti-war group called the Granny Peace Brigade, some supporting themselves with canes or walkers, held a vigil on the plaza at Lincoln Center on Tuesday night.

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The Takeaway

Spending the Night at Occupy Wall Street

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

When the TV cameras are gone, what is it like to spend the night at Occupy Wall Street? It's been a month since protesters first began to occupy Zuccotti Park, near Wall Street in New York City. Since then, temperatures have been dropping as the number of protesters in New York and across the globe grows. This leaves many wondering how many protesters will be left when winter hits. Well, we aimed to find out — and to understand better just who was spending the night there and why.

Comments [2]

It's A Free Country ®

Taibbi and Prins: Occupying Wall Street Before it Was Cool?

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

[Banks are] continuing to overvalue awful assets that they created into the 2008 beginning of the current crash we have, and they're being given a free pass by the Federal Reserve, the government, and everything else, which is exactly what happened in 1929.

Nomi Prins, senior fellow at Demos, former investment banker, and author of the new novel Black Tuesday, on The Brian Lehrer Show

Comments [24]

WQXR Blog

Next Up For Occupy Wall Street Protests: Lincoln Center

Monday, October 17, 2011

The sounds of Mozart, Debussy and Donizetti may be accompanied by chants as Occupy Wall Street protesters threaten to take over Lincoln Center Plaza Tuesday.

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It's A Free Country ®

The Politics of Occupy Wall Street, One Month In

Monday, October 17, 2011

You meet more people who voted for [Obama] really thinking it was their last-ditch attempt at using politics to get what they wanted...They saw this once-in-a-generation chance to really change America and they think it's gone, so they're being realistic about what they can do now...They've moved on from thinking they can get anything done in Washington.

—Slate political reporter Dave Weigel on The Brian Lehrer Show

Comments [57]

The Brian Lehrer Show

OWS: One Month In

Monday, October 17, 2011

Political reporter for Slate Dave Weigel discusses what impact the month-old Occupy Wall Street action is having on the political debate.

→ Add Your Comments, Listen, and Read a Recap at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Protests in Rome Turn Violent

Monday, October 17, 2011

The Occupy Wall Street movement went global over the weekend, with protests held in 950 cities in 80 countries around the world. While the majority of the demonstrations were peaceful, protests in Rome turned violent, with 135 people injured and over €1 million in damage. Cars were burned, bank windows were shattered, and a church was desecrated as the protests over austerity measures and irresponsible banking practices degraded into violence. BBC correspondent Hugh Sykes has the latest on the aftermath. 

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Is There Too Much Corporate Money in Politics?

Monday, October 17, 2011

All over the news — including here on The Takeaway — we've been hearing about Occupy Wall Street and the complaints of the "99 percent" against politicians and big corporate interests. But what exactly is the Occupy Wall Street movement alleging? One of the protesters' main complaints is that the political system is currently in the grips of corporate financial control. They may have a point, but how strong is their argument? Is our political system truly broken by the amount of money injected to campaign financing or by the lobbyists who peddle influence on K Street? Or, have money and special interests always been part of the political process?

Comments [20]

It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Clean up Occupy Wall Street Another Victory for the 99 %

Saturday, October 15, 2011

The people who stepped out of their comfort zones on a rainy Friday morning saw that they could have impact. Their presence helped their fellow New Yorkers, their courage and idealism furthered a cause they had followed online.

              -Justin Krebs, It's A Free Country blogger.

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WNYC News

Zuccotti Park Owners Back Down While Protesters Plan a 'Party'

Saturday, October 15, 2011

Occupy Wall Street protesters celebrated Friday when a plan for the park owners to clean the park was temporarily shelved. Organizers are planning marches and other events on Saturday, including an "Occupation Party" in Times Square at 5 p.m.

Comment

The Takeaway

Wall Street Protests Continue

Friday, October 14, 2011

Monday marks the one month anniversary since the beginning of the Occupy Wall Street protests. What began as a group of demonstrators setting up shop in a small park in the heart of New York's financial district has turned into a nationwide movement, with similar protests popping up in cities across the country. Protesters will be hoping for a peaceful morning, as police try to move them temporarily in order to clean the park.

Comments [11]

It's A Free Country ®

The 53 Percent Take on the 99 Percent

Friday, October 14, 2011

In response to the now-viral Tumblr post “We are the 99 Percent,” some conservatives have launched their own venture “We are the 53 percent”. The site, started by RedState.org contributor Erick Erickson and Josh Trevino of the conservative Texas Public Policy Foundation, features those who purport to represent the 53 percent of Americans who pay federal income taxes.

Comments [45]