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Occupy Wall Street

The Empire

Elected officials blast Bloomberg over midnight raid on OWS

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

(L to R) Councilman James Sanders, Comptroller John Liu, Councilman Fernando Cabrera, and Councilman Jumaane Williams (Colby Hamilton / WNYC)

City and State elected officials stood with labor leaders outside the State Supreme Court in Lower Manhattan—near where the arrested Occupy Wall Street protesters are being processed—to decry Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s eviction of protesters early this morning in Zuccotti Park and affirm the status of the movement as far from over.

“Today is not the end. Today is in fact just the beginning,” Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer told those assembled.

“What happened this morning was wrong. It was unnecessary. It was provocative. And it will only create more conflict,” said Public Advocate Bill de Blasio. “Other cities have managed to find a positive resolution, including looking at alternative sites [for the demonstrations]. The Mayor and his team never have done that. And that’s a mistake.”

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Features

Shepard Fairey Work to Sell at Auction to Benefit the Homeless

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Tuesday night, the Coalition for the Homeless holds its 17th annual ArtWalk NY benefit. For many, the highlight of the evening will be the sale of a hand-painted canvas by controversial street artist Shepard Fairey. Check out a picture of "Harmony" and other Fairey works here.

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The Takeaway

Bloomberg Says Zuccotti Park to Remain Closed Over Court Order

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Hours after police in riot gear stormed Zuccotti Park in Lower Manhattan to evict Occupy Wall Street protesters, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg defended his decision to clear the encampment in a press conference. Taking credit for the decision, Bloomberg said the raid was necessary for public safety. A judge issued a restraining order against New York City in the early hours of Monday morning, saying the protesters could return to Zucotti with their belongings. After initially saying the park would reopen at 8:00 am on Monday morning, Bloomberg said the park will remain closed while the city clarified the restraining order.

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The Takeaway

Police Evict Occupy Wall Street Protesters

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Overnight Tuesday, Occupy Wall Street protesters in Zuccotti Park were awakened and ordered to leave by hundreds of New York City police officers in heavy riot gear. After nearly two months camped out in Lower Manhattan, police tore down tents and removed protesters one by one. The Associated Press reported that 70 protesters were arrested. Police claim protesters can return after the park is "cleaned and restored." OWS protesters are said to be reconvening in neighboring Foley Square. The removal comes after similar confrontations in Oakland and Portland.

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Transportation Nation

As Police Cleared Park, Cyclists Reinforced Ranks of Occupy Wall Street

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Cyclists at Occupy Wall Street protest on Canal Street (photo by Andrea Bernstein)

A little after one in the morning in the morning, musician Roger Manning got a text message: police were removing protesters from Zuccotti Park, where Occupy Wall Street had been going on 24/7 for the last two months. With a friend, Rachel Schneider, Manning grabbed his bike and rode from his lower Manhattan apartment to Zuccotti Park.

“There were a lot of bikes,” Manning said later that morning, after protesters had migrated over to a park at Canal Street and 6th Avenue, about a mile from Zuccotti Park. “They were swarming and circling around because it’s mobile you can get in and out and around.”

Kayla Paulino also rode her bike down -- but from the South Bronx, a considerably longer distance. She said her bike enabled her to zip around police barricades, and get into the encampment before she and the rest of the protesters were cleared out.

Manning said he ran into people from Bushwick and other parts of Brooklyn who’d also cycled over.  “What else would you do in the middle of the night,” he said, “wait on a subway platform?” Besides, he says “there were rumors the subway system was skipping stops.” (The MTA says service was not impacted.)

“I didn’t know how to get a cab in Bushwick in the middle of the night,” protester Ben T. told The Takeaway’s Ben Johnson early this morning.  He also rode his bike in.

Bikes also became a way for scattered protesters to communicate with each other, said TN's own Alex Goldmark, who was reporting on the protest most of the night. “The most consistent and reliable news service were protesters on bikes who would ride around spreading word of which gathering spots had the most people and what the consensus plan was at each one,” Goldmark sent us in an early morning dispatch.

A common scene in lower Manhattan Tuesday morning, as Occupy Wall Street protesters were removed from Zuccotti Park (photo by Alex Goldmark)

“New arrivals by bike would call for a ‘mic check,’” he continued, “the method protesters use to speak to large groups without a microphone where other members of the crowd repeat the speaker's words to amplify it. The bike news messengers were always quick to speak and share what they knew, and usually got instant precedence to talk. They always started by saying their name, and where they came from.”

As New Yorkers began to wake up, others joined protesters as they made their way through Manhattan. “I typically commute by subway but the bike was a more flexible option today,” said Bushwick-based web developer Dan Phiffer, who rode in this morning with his wife, Ellie Irons, an artist. “When I heard they had evacuated the park by the time I came down to where I thought they’d be, they’d be somewhere else. I used Twitter to map out where to go and I watched the helicopters, the bike was a way better option than anything else.”

In fact, many cyclists could be seen this morning weaving their way through truck traffic on Canal Street, periodically pulling over to consult their smartphones.

 

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Jeffrey Sachs on Occupy Wall Street Out of the Park

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Jeffrey Sachs, economist and Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia, and author of The Price of Civilization, talks about the city clearing protesters from Zuccotti Park and what it means for the Occupy Wall Street movement. He wrote an op-ed about the movement's potential in Sunday’s New York Times.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Bloomberg's Removal of OWS will Galvanize Occupy Everywhere

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

If the mayor had just let time pass, OWS would have inherently changed, and the presence in the park would have diminished. The cold weather would mean a smaller, more intense and likely more radical crew would have remained. Instead, the mayor has thrown fuel on the fire.

-Justin Krebs, It's A Free Country blogger.

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The Takeaway

Occupy Wall Street Moves to Foley Square

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Occupy Wall Street protesters have vowed to carry on after being evicted from Zuccotti Park overnight Tuesday. After being thrown out of the park after two months, protesters regrouped after dawn on Tuesday in nearby Foley Square and marched toward City Hall. Ben Brock Johnson, digital editor for The Takeaway, saw protesters being removed from Zuccotti Park early Tuesday and spoke with protesters in Foley Square.

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The Takeaway

Two Reactions to the OWS Evicition

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

On Monday, The Takeaway spoke with New York University professor of international relations Alon Ben-Meir and National Review writer Charles C.W. Cooke to discuss reports of illness and lawlessness at Occupy Wall Street encampments around the country. Today, after Mayor Michael Bloomberg ordered police to clear the protesters' camp at Zuccotti Park, Ben-Meir and Cooke rejoin the program to react to the day's events.

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The Takeaway

Mayor Bloomberg Press Conference on Zuccotti Park Eviction

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

The Takeaway goes live to a press conference by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg regarding his decision to evict the Occupy Wall Street protesters from Zuccotti Park. 

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The Takeaway

NYC Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez Arrested at Occupy Wall Street

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Among the 70 Occupy Wall Street protesters arrested early Tuesday at Zuccotti Park was New York City Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez. According to his spokesman David Segal, Rodriguez, who represents northern Manhattan, is a major supporter of the Occupy movement. Segal joins The Takeaway to discuss Rodriguez's arrest.

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The Empire

OWS doesn't represent the 99%: Siena Poll

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

According to a Siena Research Institute poll released this morning, 66 percent of New York voters polled said the Occupy Wall Street protesters do not represent "the 99%"--meaning the vast majority of Americans not in the top one percent of earners. But that doesn't mean Bloomberg is going to be widely praised for booting the protesters this morning.

“By two-to-one, voters say that the Occupy Wall Street movement does not represent 99 percent of Americans,” said Siena pollster Steven Greenberg. “When it comes to how voters feel about whether the people engaged in the movement should be allowed to occupy public parks around the clock, the answer is ‘yes.’ By a 57-40 percent margin, including a majority of Democrats, independents and voters from every region, New Yorkers believe that the demonstrators should be able to stay in the parks all day and all night."

Looking at the results more closely, there are some interesting results. There is a pervading sense that the Occupation suffers from a diversity problem. But that hasn't stopped it from being viewed more favorably by black and Latino voters than by white voters. Some 56 percent of Latino's polled, and 51 percent of black voters, had a favorable opinion of Occupy Wall Street. Only 42 percent of white voters did.

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The Takeaway

Occupy Wall Street Update

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Amid conflicting reports about the legality of the eviction, the use of pepper spray or unnecessary force by police, or when Zuccotti Park will reopen, Karen Frillman, reporter for WNYC, spoke with Occupy Wall Street protestors who were debating next steps.

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The Empire

OWS booted from Zuccotti Park, but judge grants restraining order against NYP

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Early this morning police, by order of Mayor Michael Bloomberg, cleared the Occupy Wall Street encampment, citing health and fire concerns to the surrounding community. More than a hundred were arrested, according to the police.

"No right is absolute and with every right comes responsibilities," the Mayor said in a statement. "The First Amendment gives every New Yorker the right to speak out – but it does not give anyone the right to sleep in a park or otherwise take it over to the exclusion of others – nor does it permit anyone in our society to live outside the law."

The police began clearing the park at approximately 1 am. Later this morning a judge issued a temporary restraining order after the National Lawyers Guild and others asked for an injunction. The court said the city couldn't keep protesters and their belongings out of the park. There are reports the state's Supreme Court will rule later today on whether or not the temporary restraining order is maintained.

The live feed from the Occupiers is after the jump. As always, WNYC's newsroom has updates and a great photo slideshow of the events last night and this morning.

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The Takeaway

After Ouster, Occupy Oakland Protesters Return

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Police in New York cleared the Occupy Wall Street encampment in Zuccotti Park in the early hour of Tuesday morning, in what could possibly a coordinated effort to break up Occupy protests in Denver, Salt Lake City, Portland, and, notably, Oakland. The eviction in New York happened less than 24 hours after police in Oakland arrested 33 people while dismantling the Occupy camp in a downtown plaza. Oakland Mayor Jean Quan said the move was necessary because "the Occupy Wall Street movement itself is having a hard time controlling the encampments." Protesters returned to the camp Monday night.

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The Takeaway

Occupy Wall Street Evicted from Zuccotti Park

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Protesters at Occupy Wall Street's encampment in Lower Manhattan were awakened by sound cannons overnight Tuesday as police in riot gear moved in to clear the park. After nearly two months occupying Zuccotti Park, protesters were ordered to leave the park and told they could return after it had been "cleared and restored." WNYC reporter Alex Goldmark has been in Lower Manhattan overnight observing what transpired.

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WNYC News

Judge Rules Protesters Cannot Camp in Zuccotti Park

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

The same day anti-Wall Street protesters were evicted from Zuccotti Park, a judge's ruled they could not return with tents and sleeping bags to the space that has served as the group's defacto headquarters in Lower Manhattan for nearly two months.

PHOTOS | Protesters Cleared From Zuccotti Park

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The Takeaway

The Beginning of the End for Occupy Wall Street?

Monday, November 14, 2011

A murder in Oakland, a rape in Philadelphia, and a TB outbreak in Atlanta. It has not been a good weekend for Occupy encampments across the country. Meanwhile, at the original camp in New York's Zuccotti Park, an illness that's being called the "Zuccotti lung" has broken out amongst protesters. With winter looming just around the corner, might this be the beginning of the end for Occupy Wall Street?

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Occupy Tactics Weakening Its Message

Friday, November 11, 2011

Even I didn't see this coming, and I was expecting whatever eventual liberal Tea Party would arise to match or go farther than the activists on the right. It still remains to be seen where the heart of this movement will coalesce ideologically, but they've already gone far past the Tea Party in outlandish tactics.

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It's A Free Country ®

Labor’s Choice after Ohio: To Lead or Follow OWS

Friday, November 11, 2011

After labor unions won big in Ohio this week with a vote to reject limits on collective bargaining, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka called it “the road map for Democrats” to win in 2012.  

But after a bruising couple of years, and the emergence of Occupy Wall Street, some union leaders in New York are reexamining that message — and reconsidering that starkly partisan approach.

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