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Nutrition

The Takeaway

Healthy Cooking from the Convenience Store or Drug Store

Wednesday, June 02, 2010

According to the White House, 23.5 million Americans currently live in what are known as 'food deserts.' Food deserts are essentially nutritional wastelands that lack reasonable, affordable access to grocery stores. They exist primarily in urban and rural areas of the country, but can be found just about anywhere. And the people who live in them, more often than not, are forced to stock their cupboards with food from the convenience store, or even the drug store.

Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” anti-childhood obesity initiative has set the goal of eliminating all America’s food deserts in the next seven years. But if you’re living in a food desert, you might be wondering what you’re supposed to do until then to stay healthy and eat right.

Janine Whiteson, author of “Cooking Light: What to Eat,” has some ideas. She's a nutritionist who’s visited convenience stores and drug stores in some of New York’s poorest neighborhoods, and she’s found that it’s actually possible to eat healthily in a food desert if you have some practical guidelines.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: New Investigation into Banks, Listeners' Take on Raw Milk

Thursday, May 13, 2010

  • FINANCE TAKEOUT: New York Times finance correspondent, Louise Story, explains a new investigation into eight banks which may have misled ratings agencies in order to inflate the grades of certain mortgage securities.
  • LISTENERS RESPOND: Yesterday we discussed the benefits and risks of drinking raw milk. Our listeners shared their strong opinions about whether milk should be raw or pasteurized.

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The Takeaway

Making Unhealthy Meals Less Happy Meals

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Tuesday, the board of supervisors in Santa Clara County, California, decided to take a step further in the fight against obesity: they banned toy giveaways with kids' meals that don't meet certain nutritional standards. (Overall calorie count and salt content chief among them.)  This is the latest attempt in a series of measures taken by counties, cities and states to combat obesity, and is widely seen as specifically targeting McDonalds' Happy Meals.

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The Takeaway

First Take: Nutrition in Schools, Haiti's Radio Stations, Romance in the Workplace

Monday, February 08, 2010

UPDATED 9:20 p.m. 

Alex Goldmark, the Senior Producer on the night duty here.

Well, after a little investigating we're changing our changes. The producer we put on the explosion story out of Connecticut reported back that there don't seem to be all that many incidents involving natural gas plants and safety issues. We didn't want to treat this like shark attacks where we make a bigger deal out of a high profile incident and create the impression there is a trend or persistent danger worthy of panic.

So instead, we're talking about what we do think is a potential real danger (though on a much longer time horizon). Tomorrow we'll try to evaluate the scope and trajectory of Iranian nuclear ambitions. Are sanctions the answer? Is engagement? And how far along is Iran really? 

Our Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich will also bring us a radio obituary of John Murtha, including a list of all the public buildings already named after the Democratic Congressman in his district. It's way way more than you'd expect. 

 

 

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The Takeaway

A Can-Do Way to Keep Fruit and Veg

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

For many of us, saying 'so long' to summer is not an easy thing. But there is one way to capture the sunny season in a bottle – or a jar, at least. With the abundance of wonderful fruits and vegetables that are bursting out of our gardens and farmers' markets, canning offers a way to eat summer tomatoes in the dead of winter. We speak to Takeaway food contributor Kathy Gunst, author of "Stonewall Kitchen Breakfast" and "Stonewall Kitchen Winter Celebrations." We also talk to John Forti, curator of historic landscapes at the Strawberry Banke Museum in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Click through for a recipe for Kathy Gunst's roasted tomato sauce

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Studio 360

Bonus Track: Vegetables Need Not Apply

Friday, September 11, 2009

Paul Rudnick reveals how he stays slim eating nothing but processed sugar. Really.

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The Takeaway

The red (meat) scare

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

A new study finds that a diet rich in red meat and processed meats can lead to premature death. The study, which is the largest of its kind, came out yesterday in the Archives of Internal Medicine. For 10 years researchers tracked 500,000 people, ages 50-71, documenting what they ate over the course of that decade. The results find that people who consumed the equivalent of one hamburger a day increased their chances of dying by 30 percent. To fully understand the implications of this research we are joined by Barry Popkin who wrote an editorial accompanying this study. He is a professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill where he heads the division of nutrition epidemiology.

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The Takeaway

What foodies want from Obama

Wednesday, December 24, 2008

Advocates for everything from healthier school lunches to more humane treatment of farm animals to sustainable agriculture see an ally in the future President, but so far there's not much evidence that Obama himself is interested in reforming the U.S. food system. Kim Severson of The New York Times joins The Takeaway to talk about what foodies want from the new administration.

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The Takeaway

Ending hunger at home

Tuesday, December 09, 2008

A striking one in ten Americans use food stamps, but many who are eligible aren't getting help.

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The Takeaway

Recession Food 101

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

"If you can plan ahead two days in the kitchen, rather than just for tonight, you can go a long way toward saving tons of money -- just by avoiding those urges to go out and buy convenience food."
--Matt and Ted Lee on eating well for less


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The Takeaway

Baby-led weaning: When your baby skips the puree and feeds himself

Wednesday, October 01, 2008

"Baby-led weaning" is about skipping the baby food and letting your infant feed himself. The Takeaway talks to Helen Stewart, who blogs about baby-led weaning and to Keith Dixon, the father of an infant who eats everything he does — in mashed up form.

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The Takeaway

More melamine-tainted milk found in China

Friday, September 19, 2008

Shops and supermarkets across China have been withdrawing dairy products after the revelation that powdered baby milk, and now liquid milk, has been contaminated. A government watchdog group said nearly ten per cent of milk samples taken in recent days contained the industrial chemical melamine, which makes the protein content appear higher. Four babies have died and more than six-thousand children have fallen ill as a result of the contamination.

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The Takeaway

Nutraceuticals: Sardines in orange juice, and other foods mixed for... health?

Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Food manufacturers are increasing the healthful properties of orange juice, chocolate, yogurt, peanut butter and countless other products by adding "nutraceuticals," foods (or part of a food) that provides medical or health benefits. Omega-3 oil can be extracted from fish and mixed in with orange juice. Antioxidants extracted from beets, carrots and bananas can be added to peanut butter. Is it really healthier, or is it just another strategy to open wallets a little wider with something new to shove down the gullet?

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The Takeaway

Stop global warming? Put down the burger

Tuesday, September 09, 2008

Do you want to battle climate change effectively? Then put down that cheeseburger! The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that direct emissions from meat production account for about 18 percent of the world's total greenhouse gas — roughly equivalent to the amount from cars and trucks. Are there really global benefits for going meat-free?

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The Takeaway

A fast-food moratorium raises questions of freedom and fries

Wednesday, August 13, 2008

In a section of Los Angeles, the city council has put a moratorium on new fast food restaurants. The measure is intended to promote healthier lifestyles in a working-class area where obesity is a concern. New York has required calorie labels at chain restaurants to combat obesity — where do government responsibility and personal responsibility intersect?

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The Takeaway

The latest restaurant trend: Eat now, pay whatever

Friday, July 18, 2008

With food and gas prices soaring, eating out has become a luxury. But a growing movement, with its pay-what-you-can policy, is making a trip to the restaurant affordable—and for some, free. The Takeaway talks to Denise Cerrata, a pioneering foodie with civic-minded flair. Five years ago she opened a restaurant that lets people work for a meal or donate whatever they can afford.

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The Takeaway

A nutritionist's take on the new children's cholesterol guidelines

Monday, July 07, 2008

Guest: Dr. Marion Nestle, Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health at New York University

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The Takeaway

Hungry for change: Rethinking how the poor get healthy and affordable food

Monday, July 07, 2008

Back in the 1960’s, when the middle-class fled the cities for suburban refuge, there was an unforeseen consequence: the ‘grocery gap.’ It’s been widening over the years and as gas and food prices soar it’s gotten harder for the poor to get healthy and affordable food. One man, however, with a very simple plan, is turning this around: Pennsylvania State Representative Dwight Evans.

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The Takeaway

Pediatrics panel suggests screenings, drugs to deal with childhood cholesterol

Monday, July 07, 2008

Guest: Dr. Peter Jung, pediatrician, Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston, Texas

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The Takeaway

The end of food

Thursday, June 12, 2008

The signs are all around us: salmonella outbreaks; riots over food shortages; fears over mad cow disease; water shortages; skyrocketing global food prices. These are portents for the end of easily accessible food. Paul Roberts, author of "The End of Food" and "The End of Oil" sees the potential cataclysm ahead.

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