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Nuclear

The Takeaway

Takeouts: Capitol Hill as Training Ground for Top Lobby Jobs, START Treaty's Journey Through Congress

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

  • FINANCIAL TAKEOUT: What’s the difference between a Washington Lobbyist and a former congressional aide? It sounds like the setup to a bad joke, but in fact, Louise Story, The New York Times Wall Street and finance reporter, says that the question is actually very valid and becoming very hard to answer.
  • WASHINGTON TAKEOUT: With the nuclear summit winding down, The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, looks at the future of the START treaty, which President Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev signed last week. The treaty aims to significantly decrease the amount of nuclear weapons between the two countries, but it looks like it's going to be a long and slow journey for START treaty in Congress.

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The Takeaway

Aiming to Stop Black Market Nuclear Traffic

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

President Obama's nuclear security summit, held in Washington, D.C. and hosting 46 world leaders, wrapped up last night with a request from the president. He called on all the nations present to cooperate in keeping nuclear material out of the hands of terrorists.

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The Takeaway

First Take: Where are there Unsecured Nukes?, Calls for Militia in Oklahoma, Trick Yourself into Saving

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Anna Sale here on the day shift.

We had a great conversation this morning about President Obama's charge to secure the world's nuclear material in four years, but we still have more questions. Which countries possess unsecured nuclear material? Where is that material located, which groups want to get their hands on it — and which groups already have their hands on it? We’re hoping to answer some of these questions with Sharon Squassoni, an expert on nuclear proliferation and prevention with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. And we’re on the hunt for an investigator who works to track down stolen nukes for some insight into what kind of detective work goes into finding and securing dangerous nuclear material.

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The Takeaway

Will America Build New Nuclear Reactors?

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

President Obama announced Tuesday that he approved a loan guarantee to underwrite construction of two new nuclear reactors in Georgia.  These would be the first new reactors built in the United States since the 1970s. Will this be the start of a new wave of nuclear energy in this country?

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The Takeaway

Iran Ups Nuclear Ante

Tuesday, February 09, 2010

Iran's nuclear chief says the country will begin enriching uranium to twenty percent strength — up from 3.5 percent, and build ten new nuclear facilities over the next year. While the construction of that many facilities in one year is probably not achievable, and while it takes ninety percent enrichment to make a nuclear bomb, the reaction from the United States and France was swift and harsh: The two nations called for even more sanctions on Iran. We ask how great the threat of a nuclear Iran really is.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Budget Deficit, Job Numbers, Pakistan Trial

Monday, February 01, 2010

We take a look at the week ahead in news with Marcus Mabry, international business editor for The New York Times, and Rob Watson, BBC political correspondent.  They look at President Obama's 2011 budget, the trial of five American terror suspects in Pakistan, and negotiations between the U.S. and Russia over nuclear arms reduction.

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The Takeaway

Nuclear Deadline Past, Next Steps in Iran

Friday, January 01, 2010

Iran apparently took "no action" towards complying with a U.N. mandate to turn over its nuclear fuel for processing by the end of 2009, and as political protests continue, opposition leader Mir Hossein Mousavi says he's "not afraid to die" for his cause.  We check in for the most recent news from Iran with Kasra Naji, special correspondent for BBC Persian Television.

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The Takeaway

Protesters Slain in Iran Protests

Monday, December 28, 2009

Violence erupted in Tehran yesterday, leaving at least 8 people dead. The deaths came after police fired upon protesters; one of those killed was the nephew of Mir Hossein Mousavi, the leading opposition candidate in fall's presidential election.  L.A. Times Middle East correspondent Borzou Daragahi believes more protests are on their way in Iran.  Iran is also facing President Obama's deadline of December 31st to sign a deal that would make Iran ship out its enriched uranium in exchange for nuclear fuel.  The U.S. has said that they will pursue tougher U.N. sanctions on Iran if they do not sign the deal. 

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WQXR News

Iran Test-Fires Longest Range Missile

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

If fired, the missile could reach as far as Israel and parts of Europe.

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The Takeaway

Iran's Nuclear Chess Game Continues

Monday, November 30, 2009

Iran announced yesterday it wouldn't comply with a demand by the United Nations' nuclear agency to stop work on a once-secret nuclear fuel enrichment plant, and said it would construct 10 more such nuclear plants.

The New York Times chief Washington correspondent, David Sanger, joins us to talk about the latest move by Iran in its nuclear manuevering, and how the international community might respond.

 

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The Takeaway

Defiant Iran Wants Ten More Nuke Plants

Monday, November 30, 2009

BBC Tehran correspondent Jon Leyne joins us to examine the most recent move in Iran's nuclear chess game. Iran yesterday said it would not comply with a demand by the International Atomic Energy Agency to stop work on a once-secret nuclear fuel enrichment plant, and escalated the confrontation by declaring it would construct 10 more such plants.

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The Takeaway

UN Inspectors Visit Iran Nuke Facility

Monday, October 26, 2009

United Nations inspectors arrived in Iran yesterday for a three-day visit of its recently-disclosed uranium enrichment facility. The visit comes after Iran said Friday that it needs more time to consider a deal to send their uranium stockpiles out of the country for monitored enrichment. We're joined by Jon Leyne, BBC Tehran correspondent, and Scott Ritter, former chief weapons inspector for the U.N. Special Commission in Iraq, who tells us about the importance of the inspections.

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The Takeaway

Tehran Due to Answer Nuclear Proposal Today

Friday, October 23, 2009

Iran is due to respond today to a United Nations proposal; under the plan, Iran would export most of its enriched uranium to Russia for further refining. Iran would get the fuel it needs for its reactor but not have enough uranium to make a bomb. We're joined by BBC Reporter Amir Paivar for the details.

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The Takeaway

U.S. and Iran Agree on Draft Nuclear Deal

Thursday, October 22, 2009

Yesterday in Vienna, President Obama’s strategy of engagement with Iran may have resulted in a big first step toward stopping that country from getting a nuclear weapon. Iranian negotiators agreed to a draft deal that would send 75 percent of Iran’s low-enriched uranium to Russia. Iran would, in turn, receive highly enriched uranium in a form that would be useful for nuclear power but not nuclear warheads. We speak to BBC Tehran correspondent Jon Leyne for an on-the-ground look at the news. We also speak with Alex Glaser, a physicist who looks at nuclear proliferation issues at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, and Will Tobey, a senior fellow at Harvard’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda With Marcus Mabry and Jonathan Marcus

Monday, October 19, 2009

Marcus Mabry, international business editor for our partner, The New York Times, and Jonathan Marcus, diplomatic correspondent for our partner, the BBC, look at the week ahead, primarily at the violence in central Asia. They will also peek ahead at what's going to happen with Vice President Joe Biden's visit to Eastern Europe, and examine the latest on Afghanistan's election controversy and how that will affect the White House's decision on troop levels there. All that and how the latest bombings in Iran affect ongoing meetings about their nuclear program.

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The Takeaway

Date Set for IAEA to Inspect Iran's New Nuke Facility

Monday, October 05, 2009

The director of the U.N. nuclear agency, Mohamed ElBaradei, says that Iran has set a date for inspectors to visit that country's newly revealed uranium enrichment plant, outside the city of Qom. That news comes as a relief to some analysts.

But a leaked report by the agency says that Iran possesses the data to make a nuclear weapon. Is Iran finally playing ball with the U.N., or is it just telling them what it wants to hear? We ask David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, for answers.

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The Takeaway

IAEA to Inspect Iran's Uranium Enrichment Plant

Friday, October 02, 2009

The U.S. and Iran have discussed uranium enrichment in meetings outside Geneva, and Iran has agreed to open its uranium enrichment plant to international inspection in the next two weeks. For the latest, we're joined by Steve Erlanger, Paris Bureau Chief for our partner The New York Times.

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The Takeaway

US and Iran Could Meet Face-to-Face

Thursday, October 01, 2009

After nearly 30 years of stony diplomatic silence, Iran and the U.S. sat down together at a negotiating table early today. Six countries are attending the meetings in Geneva to talk to Iranian representatives about the country's nuclear program. U.S. representatives are sharing the table with Britain, France, Germany, China and Russia, but reports yesterday evening suggest the U.S. could meet one-on-one with Iran. We preview the talks and look at the pros and cons of imposing more sanctions.

We speak with John Limbert, author of "Negotiating With Iran: Wrestling the Ghosts of History." He was an American diplomat in Tehran during the Iranian Revolution, and was held hostage for over a year during that time. We also speak to George Lopez, a sanctions expert and senior fellow at the University of Notre Dame; and Mark Landler, diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Debate Grows Over Response to Iran's Nuclear Attempts

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

The U.S. and its allies are united in their public concerns about Iran's secret nuclear ambitions. But The New York Times reports that U.S. and Israeli intelligence agencies disagree on one big point: how far Iran's attempts to design or acquire a nuclear warhead have come. U.S. officials say that Iran halted work on weapons design in 2003, but Germany, France and Israel think differently. We get the story from New York Times defense correspondent Mark Mazzetti.

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The Takeaway

International Ramifications of Iranian Missile-Testing

Monday, September 28, 2009

State media in Iran is reporting that the country launched medium- and long-range missiles last night and this morning. Joining us to talk about the situation is Iran's ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency, Ali Asghar Soltanieh, who joins us from Vienna. (click through for the full interview transcript.)

"We will not listen to anyone to dictate to us. We have obligation as the member of the IAEA, we have obligations because we are party to [the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty], and we will do our responsiblity.... We have been fully cooperating and all our nuclear installations are under 24-hour cameras of the IAEA, and this installation also, that we have announced, will be. It is a pity that they are talking about 'secret' plans or deception or concealment."
—Ali Asghar Soltanieh, Iranian ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency

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