Streams

 

 

Nsa

The Brian Lehrer Show

National Security Journalism Under Fire

Monday, August 19, 2013

At the London airport this weekend, David Miranda, Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald's partner (and professional collaborator) was detained under Terrorism Act 2000 for 9 hours and questioned about the information supplied by NSA leaker Edward Snowden. Also over the weekend, Time magazine reporter Michael Grunwald tweeted (and quickly deleted) that he would defend a drone strike that "takes out" Wikileaks' Julian Assange. Amy Davidson, who writes the "Close Read" column for The New Yorker, discusses the role of national security journalism in the digital age, and why so many reporters feel so intimidated.

Comments [24]

The Takeaway

Violent Confrontations Continue in Egypt | The History of the Voting Rights Act: The Origins of Section 4 | Experiments With a Tech-Free Summer Camp

Monday, August 19, 2013

Violent Confrontations Continue in Egypt | New Report Shows More Oversteps By NSA | The History of the Voting Rights Act: The Origins of Section 4 |Philly Schools to Open on Time Despite Financial Woes | Experiments With a Tech-Free Summer Camp | One Year Later, Undocumented Youth Program a Success

On The Media

The Annoying Technology Journalists Should Be Using

Friday, August 16, 2013

The way Edward Snowden communicated with the Laura Poitras and Glenn Greenwald, the journalists who eventually wrote stories based on his NSA leaks, was by using encryption software. One of the most popular forms of encryption is called PGP, or "Pretty Good Privacy." Brooke talks to Gawker staff writer Adrian Chen about trying to set up PGP on his computer and how it should be the baseline for national security reporters.

Modest Mouse - Here It Comes

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

Can There Be a Peaceful Path Forward for Egypt? | Report Shows Mass NSA Spying Dates Back to 2008 | What Will Eric Holder's Legacy Be?

Friday, August 16, 2013

Dissecting The Egyptian Division in Cairo & the United States | Drug Crimes and Mandatory Minimums: A Judge's Take | What Will Eric Holder's Legacy Be? | New Movie Releases: The Butler, Paranoia, Jobs, Kickass 2 | Report Shows Mass NSA Spying Dates Back to 2008 | Can There Be a Peaceful ...

The Takeaway

Email Services Defy Government Orders, Close Doors in Response to Spying

Monday, August 12, 2013

Lavabit and Silent Circle have stopped providing their email encryption services, sending a message that they would rather close down than give up data for U.S. surveillance. Silent Circle president and co-founder Phil Zimmerman joins us to explain how we got here, and what the next steps are for ensuring data privacy.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

NSA Introduces New Plan To Prevent Leaks

Monday, August 12, 2013

General Keith Alexander said that the NSA plans to reduce the number of systems administrators by up to 90 percent. By limiting the number of people with access, Alexander says the leaking of sensitive information will be prevented. Noah Shachtman is Foreign Policy's executive editor for news and a fellow at the Brookings Institution. He joins us to discuss the role of a system administrator and whether this will actually help prevent leaks.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

What You Need to Know About This Week's Terror Warnings

Monday, August 05, 2013

After an initial worldwide terror alert issued Friday, the State Department has now closed diplomatic posts in 19 North African and Middle Eastern countries. Karen Greenberg of Fordham's Center on National Security discusses the warnings, what they say about the state of al Qaeda, and how they fit into our ongoing conversation about the role of NSA surveillance.

Comments [13]

Slate Political Gabfest

Slate: The Friend of My Enemy Is Not Aiding My Enemy Gabfest

Friday, August 02, 2013

Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring John Dickerson, Emily Bazelon and special guest Todd Purdum. This week: Whistleblowers Snowden and Manning make news, a Texas-sized voter rights fight, and premature Clinton fatigue.

Comment

Gabfest Radio

The Best First Line Ever Edition

Friday, August 02, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists John Dickerson and Emily Bazelon are joined by special guest Todd Purdum, contributing editor for Vanity Fair and senior writer at Politico. They discuss the Bradley Manning verdict and the latest news about Edward Snowden and the NSA. Then, they discuss how the Justice Department plans to regain its oversight of Texas election law after the Supreme Court’s June ruling on the Voting Rights Act.

Comment

On The Media

Telegram Surveillance

Friday, August 02, 2013

Back in the pre-digital 1940's, telegrams were the basis of the first large scale domestice surveillance program, launched by an agency that would become the NSA. Brooke speaks to "Daily Dot" writer Joe Kloc about the history of US surveillance, from the telegram to email.

Comment

The Takeaway

Sen. Saxby Chambliss Talks NSA, GOP's Future in Georgia

Thursday, August 01, 2013

Last week, at the urging of the White House, the House of Representatives defeated a bill to curb the NSA’s powers. But lawmakers are facing mounting pressure to limit government surveillance programs. Republican Senator Saxby Chambliss of Georgia is the Vice Chairman of the Senate Select Intelligence Committee. He has been exploring options for how best to modify the surveillance program. Senator Chambliss joins us on the program.

Comments [12]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Glenn Greenwald vs. the NSA

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald discusses his continued reporting on the NSA's surveillance of telephone and digital records, plus his upcoming congressional testimony on the program.

Comments [39]

The Takeaway

Congress Rejects Effort to Curb NSA Surveillance

Thursday, July 25, 2013

On Wednesday, Congress took up a controversial amendment designed to curb the NSA’s powers, but the bill was defeated in the House of Representatives in a vote of 205-to-217. The legislation would have limited the agency's ability to collect details by cutting funding to the program. Republican Congressman David Schweikert, representing Arizona’s 6th District was one of the bill’s supporters. He joins The Takeaway to discuss his support for the legislation and what the possible next steps may be.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

NSA Authority Remains Unchecked

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Kate Nocera, BuzzFeed reporter discusses last night's House vote that failed -- by a surprisingly close vote -- to curb the NSA's authority to collect personal information, and what it tells us about attitudes towards the agency post-Snowden.

Comments [13]

New Tech City

Meet Atlas: The Pentagon's 'Freakily Lifelike' Robot

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

The Defense Department has long teamed up with technology firms to create weapons and vehicles like fighter jets. One of its latest projects is a bipedal robot called Atlas that can walk, run, jump and climb and could be the future of disaster response on and off the battlefield.

Comment

The Takeaway

Snowden to Meet With Human Rights Groups in Quest for Asylum

Friday, July 12, 2013

After three weeks of silence, NSA leaker Edward Snowden is meeting with international human rights workers today from his base in the Moscow Airport. In an email invitation to groups like Human Rights Watch and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Snowden wrote that he has "been extremely fortunate to enjoy and accept many offers of support and asylum from brave countries around the world,” according to The New York Times. Joining us is Ellen Barry, Moscow correspondent for our partner The New York Times. She walks us through the possible outcomes this meeting could produce.

In an email invitation to groups like Human Rights Watch and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Snowden wrote that he has "been extremely fortunate to enjoy and accept many offers of support and asylum from brave countries around the world,” according to The New York Times. In the note, Snowden says that U.S. government is carrying out an "unlawful campaign" to block his attempts at being granted asylum.
Joining us is Ellen Barry, Moscow correspondent for our partner The New York Times. She walks us through the possible outcomes this meeting could produce

 

Comment

The Takeaway

NSA Revelations Present Business, Ethical Challenges in Silicon Valley

Friday, July 12, 2013

Yesterday, The Guardian released a report showing the extent to which Microsoft worked with the NSA to make data from Outlook, Hotmail and Skype accessible. They highlight the complicated business and ethical problems in Silicon Valley. Steve Blank, author of "The Secret History of Silicon Valley," joins us to explain Microsoft's role in circumventing the encryption process.

Comment

The Takeaway

Snowden to Meet with Human Rights Groups | Man Made Millions Selling Fake Bomb Detectors | Space Travel on Earth?

Friday, July 12, 2013

NSA Revelations Present Business, Ethical Challenges in Silicon Valley | Snowden to Meet with Human Rights Groups in Quest for Asylum | The Man Who Made Millions Selling Fake Bomb Detectors | Tube Transportation: New Technology Designed For Space Travel on Earth | New Movie Releases: 'Grown Ups 2,' 'Pacific Rim,' An Update from Johnny Depp 

Slate Culture Gabfest

The Culture Gabfest: Mini Goth Dumbo Edition

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

Slate critics Dana Stevens, Julia Turner and Stephen Metcalf discuss the MTV show "Catfish," Frank Rich's column on the NSA and privacy, and Dana's tirade against flip flops.

Comment

The Takeaway

Secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court Sees Role Expanding

Monday, July 08, 2013

New information is out on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA), which operates in secret and approves government surveillance programs—including the two revealed by leaker Edward Snowden. The court's role is expanding to more than just surveillance programs. Eric Lichtblau is a reporter in the Washington Bureau for our partner The New York Times. He's reported on these broad expansions of the FISA court for the paper and joins The Takeaway to discuss this expansion of powers.

Comment