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The Leonard Lopate Show

James Salter's Novel All That Is

Thursday, May 09, 2013

PEN/Faulkner winner James Salter talks about his new novel, All That Is , a sweeping, seductive story set in the years after World War II. It’s the story of Philip Bowman, who returns to America from in battles off Okinawa, and finds a position as a book editor. It is a time when publishing is still largely a private affair, and in this world of dinners, deals, and literary careers, Bowman finds that he fits in perfectly. But despite his success, what eludes him is love.

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: James Salter

Thursday, May 09, 2013

Writer James Salter was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently to talk about his novel, All That Is. He also told us what he's been reading recently. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Southern Cross the Dog: A Novel

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

Bill Cheng talks about his novel Southern Cross the Dog. It’s an epic literary debut in which the bonds between three childhood friends are upended by the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927. In its aftermath, one young man must choose between the lure of the future and the claims of the past.

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The Blind Man’s Garden, by Nadeem Aslam

Thursday, May 02, 2013

Nadeem Aslam discusses The Blind Man’s Garden, his new novel set in Pakistan and Afghanistan in the months following 9/11. It’s a story about two foster brothers from a small town in Pakistan who were inseparable as children but whose adult lives have diverged. When one decides to sneak across the border into Afghanistan to help care for wounded civilians, the other decides to go with him to protect him.

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Jessica Soffer's Novel, Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Jessica Soffer discusses her novel Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots. It’s the story of two women adrift in New York, a widow and an almost-orphan, each searching for someone she’s lost. They’re brought together through cooking, and begin to suspect they are connected by more than their love of food.

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Better Medicine, Jim Parsons, Rachel Kushner's New Novel, Vali Nars on Foreign Policy

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

We’ll find out what can be done to protect the estimated 100 thousand patients who are affected by preventable medical errors or infections. Jim Parsons drops by to talk about his hit TV series, “The Big Bang Theory” and the upcoming HBO version of Larry Kramer’s play “The Normal Heart.” Rachel Kushner discusses her new novel, The Flame Throwers. Vali Nasr, who was senior advisor to Ambassador Richard Holbrooke, explains why he feels American foreign policy is in retreat.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Rachel Kushner's Novel The Flame Throwers

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Rachel Kushner talks about her novel, The Flame Throwers, the story of a young artist and the worlds she encounters in New York and Rome in the mid-1970s—by turns underground, elite, and dangerous. She falls in with members of the radical movement that overtook Italy in the 1970s.

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April's Book: Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary, Translated by Lydia Davis

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Madame Bovary, one of the most celebrated novels ever written, defined the novel as an art form when it was published in 1875. Lydia Davis’s landmark translation of Flaubert’s work breathes new life into it. When it was first published, Madame Bovary was embraced by bourgeois women who felt it illuminated the frustrations of their lives. It tells the story of Emma Rouault, whose dreams of a passionate life crumble when she marries a dull, provincial doctor Charles Bovary. She struggles to escape the tedium of her days as a wife and mother. She has a series of disappointing affairs and spends money getting into debt, with tragic consequences for her husband and daughter.

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Nathaniel Rich on Odds Against Tomorrow

Monday, April 15, 2013

Nathaniel Rich talks about his new novel, Odds Against Tomorrow. It’s set in New York City in the near future and follows Mitchell Zukor, a gifted young mathematician hired by a mysterious new financial consulting firm, FutureWorld, to calculate worst-case scenarios in intricate detail.

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Foreclosure Settlement, John Lurie, Nathaniel Rich's Novel, Sequencing the Human Genome

Monday, April 15, 2013

ProPublica’s Paul Kiel explains how the government plans to compensate the 3.9 million homeowners who were victims of aggressive foreclosure policies. John Lurie discusses his career in television, film, art, and, of course, music. Nathaniel Rich talks about his new novel, Odds Against Tomorrow. And yesterday marked the tenth anniversary of the first complete mapping of the human genome, and we’ll talk to bioethicist Robert Klitzman about how the human genome sequence has changed medicine.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jennifer Gilmore's Novel The Mothers

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Jennifer Gilmore talks about her latest novel, The Mothers, the story of one couple’s ardent desire for a child and their emotional journey through adoption.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The CIA's Way of War, Adoption Stories, the Gurus of How To

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Mark Mazzetti explains how the line between soldiers and spies has been blurred, and what that means for America’s national security. Mary Williams talks about growing up in the Black Panther movement and then being adopted as a teenager by Jane Fonda. Jennifer Gilmore talks about her latest novel, The Mothers. And our gurus of how-to, Alvin and Lawrence Ubell, will be here to answer your calls and questions about home repair.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Meg Wolitzer's Novel The Interestings

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

Meg Wolitzer discusses her new novel, The Interestings, a panoramic story about what becomes of early talent, and the roles that art, money, and even envy can play in close friendships. It follows a group of teenagers who met at summer camp in the 1970s into adulthood.

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The Magic of Saida, by M. G. Vassanji

Monday, April 01, 2013

M. G. Vassanji discusses his new novel, The Magic of Saida. It tells the story of an African/Indian man who returns to the town of his birth in search of the girl he once loved—and the sense of self that has always eluded him. The novel moves between the past and present, and tells a personal story as well as a broad story of political promise and failure in contemporary Africa.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Fever, a Novel about Typhoid Mary

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Mary Beth Keane discusses her new novel, Fever, about the woman known as “Typhoid Mary.” Mary Mallon emigrated from Ireland at age 15 to make her way in New York City. She became a cook for the aristocracy until a “medical engineer” noticed that she left a trail of disease wherever she cooked. The Department of Health sent Mallon to North Brother Island, where she was kept in isolation from 1907 to 1910, then released under the condition that she never work as a cook again.

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Iraq Today, Sustainable Architecture, Kids and Screens

Thursday, March 21, 2013

We wrap up our three-day series to mark the tenth anniversary of the invasion of Iraq with a look at the impact the war has had both on the soldiers who have fought in it and Iraq’s environment. Architect Bjarke Ingels explains “hedonistic sustainability.” American Book Award-winner Mackenzie Bezos on her new novel, Traps. We’ll find out about the microbial life that scientists have discovered over 6 miles beneath the ocean’s surface. And, Hanna Rosin looks at whether apps geared toward kids are educational or are just teaching kids how to zone out.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mackenzie Bezos on Her Novel Traps

Thursday, March 21, 2013

American Book Award winner Mackenzie Bezos discusses her new novel, Traps. It tells the story of how the paths of four very different women intersect, briefly but significantly, in ways that will change each of them forever.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Philip Roth on the Leonard Lopate Show

Monday, March 18, 2013

Celebrated novelist Philip Roth is turning 80 this week. As you may have heard on WNYC, he's returning to Newark to mark the occasion. You can mark the occasion by listening to his conversations with Leonard Lopate - he was on the show in 2008 to talk about Indignation and in 2010 to talk about Nemesis.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Benjamin Stein's Novel, The Canvas

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Benjamin Stein and Brian Zumhagen discuss The Canvas, written by Stein and translated by Zumhagen. Loosely based on the true story of Binjamin Wilkomirski, whose fabricated 1995 Holocaust memoir transfixed the reading public, The Canvas has two inter-related narratives that each begin at either end of the book and meet in the middle.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ruth Ozeki's Novel A Tale for the Time Being

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Ruth Ozeki talks about her new novel, The Tale for the Time Being. It connects a 16-year-old in Tokyo with a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox—possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami.

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