Streams

North Africa

The Takeaway

One Reporter Looks Back at His Year in the Arab Spring

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

On December 17, 2010, Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in protest of his treatment at the hands of municipal officials. His act of desperation would become the catalyst for a full-scale revolution that would sweep across North Africa and into the Middle East in what would become known as the Arab Spring. This week has brought more violent clashes between protesters and police in Egypt, but the idea of such actions transpiring just a year ago would have been unfathomable. The year 2011 has seen democratic movements swell in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and Syria.

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The Takeaway

Tunisia Holds Its First Free Elections

Monday, October 24, 2011

Many months after a man in Tunisia set himself on fire to protest his country's lack of a viable democratic government, some 90 percent of eligible voters in the country cast their votes on Sunday. Over 4.1 million people cast their ballots in the first democratic election from the nation that ignited the Arab Spring. Early signs show that the once banned Islamist Ennahda party is leading, possibly indicating a shift for the secular nation.

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The Takeaway

Does Algeria's Government Know Gadhafi's Whereabouts?

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

As rebels in Libya continued their search for Col. Moammar Gadhafi yesterday, Algerian officials announced that Gadhafi's wife and three sons had crossed the border from Libya, and are now hiding out there. More countries are continuing to recognize the new Libyan government — except for Algeria, which remains the only North African neighbor not to address Libya as such.

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The Takeaway

With 3 Leaders Dead, What's Ahead for Al-Qaida?

Monday, June 13, 2011

Somali officials confirmed Saturday that they shot and killed Fazul Abdullah Mohammed, the head of al-Qaida in East Africa, and one of the FBI's most wanted terrorists, at a checkpoint on Tuesday. Mohammed had a $5 million bounty on his head for his connections to bombings of embassies in Africa that lead to the deaths of more than 200 people. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called the killing a "significant blow to al-Qaida." 

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The Takeaway

'It Sure Looks Like Civil War to Me,' Nicholas Kristof on Yemen

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

The UN Human Rights office has said that it received reports that at least 50 people have been killed in Taiz since Sunday. Forces loyal to President Ali Abdullah Saleh also bombed the city of Zinjibar with airstrikes after Islamic militants had overtaken the city.Nasser Arrabyee is in Sanaa, Yemen reporting for The New York Times. He says that "many of the protesters are peaceful, but the majority of the protesters belong to the Islamist party." Nicholas Kristof, columnist for The New York Times says that the fighting looks like a civil war to him, but that intervention is not an option. "The problem with intervention is that one reason why al-Qaida and Islamists have already grown pretty strong is because of real resentment at what they see as American influence there."

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The Takeaway

Alexander McCall Smith on North African Democracy

Monday, April 04, 2011

Born in what is now Zimbabwe, best-selling Scottish author Alexander McCall Smith has shown millions of Americans a lighter, more human side of Africa. Best known for the "No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency" series of novels, Smith is also emeritus professor of medical law at the University of Edinburgh, and a world renowned expert on bio-ethics. Celeste sat down with Smith to discuss his newest novel, "The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party," at the Great Hall of the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art.

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It's A Free Country ®

Live From The Greene Space: Regime Change and its Aftermath

Friday, February 11, 2011

Hear audio above, watch the full video here, and check out the slideshow below.

On Friday, The Brian Lehrer Show and It’s A Free Country called a meeting. The agenda: understanding revolution.  At a live event in the Greene Space, people with first-hand experience of revolution from all over the world gathered with interested audience members for an in-depth conversation about what happens after an uprising. Journalists, academics and policy experts were there to inform and be informed by those with their ears to the ground — and to offer advice to Egyptians in the midst of revolution.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Advice for Egypt

Friday, February 11, 2011

Guests today include: 

As well as Shinasi A. Rama, deputy director of the NYU Alexander Hamilton Center for Political Economy and one of the leaders of the Albanian student movement; Suketu Mehta, New York City-based journalist, professor of journalism at NYU, and author of Maximum City: Bombay Lost and FoundNeferti Tadiar, professor and chair of women's studies at Barnard College; Anne Nelson, adjunct associate professor of international and public affairs at Columbia University who's covered revolutions as a journalist in Central America; Omar Cheta, PhD candidate in the departments of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies and History at NYU; Shiva Sarram, who was eight years old during the 1979 revolution in Iran and the founder of the Blossom Hill Foundation, which works with children affected by conflict.; Gladys Carbo-Flower, recording artist and witness to Cuba's revolution; Didi Ogude, a recent NYU graduate who was ten years old during South Africa's regime change in the nineties; Hesham El-Meligy, a Muslim-American community organizer from Staten Island; and Ali Al Sayed, Egyptian New Yorker and owner of Kabab Café in Little Egypt, Astoria, Queens.