Streams

 

 

Newspapers

On The Media

Newspapers Go To Washington

Friday, September 25, 2009

Washington is paying attention to the newspaper crisis. The president has even weighed in. But some worry that any government help would create a conflict of interest. Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD), sponsor of The Newspaper Revitalization Act, and Jim Moroney, publisher of ...

Comments [6]

On The Media

Post-Newspaper Journalism?

Friday, August 21, 2009

What would happen if a major U.S. city was suddenly without a daily newspaper? It seems increasingly possible these days and so the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism set out to find an answer. They hired business analysts to create economic ...

Comments [1]

On The Media

The Road to Non-Profit

Friday, August 21, 2009

News organizations are finding it increasingly difficult to turn a profit, thus making non-profit news an increasingly attractive solution. Jim Barnett has been studying and blogging about non-profit journalism for 5 years and he says new organizations are springing up left and

Comments [2]

WNYC News

On The Media's Eulogy Project

Friday, August 07, 2009

iStock_000001043541XSmall

On The Media wants to hear your thoughts on the slow death of newspapers – are you sad to see them go or glad to see the back of them? Either way, send your emails to onthemedia@wnyc.org and write ...

Comment

On The Media

A Local Paper's War Story

Friday, August 07, 2009

The Gazette of Colorado Springs recently published a series about the psychological struggles of a group of Iraq War veterans who'd been arrested for violent crimes at home. But while doing that reporting, journalist Dave Philipps uncovered another story about war crimes committed in Iraq. Philipps explains why ...

Comments [4]

On The Media

Give it Back

Friday, July 31, 2009

Last week the AP announced plans to electronically tag their online content so illegal use will be easier to track. The Fair Syndication Consortium, which includes The New York Times and The Washington Post, is trying to get a piece of the ad revenue other sites ...

Comments [2]

On The Media

Neswpaper Leighoffs

Friday, July 24, 2009

Budget cuts at newspapers have led to the firing of many copy editors. With their departure comes an increase in errors. John McIntyre was let go by The Baltimore Sun after 23 years and says newspapers are foolish to fire a disproportionate number of copy editors.

Comments [20]

On The Media

Copyright Flack

Friday, July 24, 2009

Breaking news is now copied and redistributed on thousands of websites across the Internet within minutes - producing a World Wide Web of carbon copies. First Amendment lawyer David Marburger argues that this redistribution is hurting newspapers financially and that the fault lies with the Copyright Act.

Comments [7]

On The Media

Help Line

Friday, June 26, 2009

A few weeks ago Ron Lieber, the New York Times "Your Money" columnist, faced a predicament. He'd undertaken an ambitious research project about student loans that he couldn't possibly finish by his deadline. So he came clean and asked readers for help. Lieber explains his journalistic experiment ...

Comment

On The Media

Moving On Up?

Friday, June 26, 2009

Ross Douthat and Ezra Klein are two new opinion writers at the New York Times and the Washington Post. Both started out in the blogosphere, and both are young - Klein 25, Douthat 29. The two discuss whether they may have actually lost a measure of influence by ...

Comment

On The Media

Watching the World Go By

Friday, June 12, 2009

Iran and Lebanon held elections this week. Iraq saw a spike in violence. A hotel bombing hit Pakistan. There's so much to cover around the world and increasingly fewer news outlets can afford to do it. McClatchy's Mark Seibel wrote a candid piece about his news ...

Comments [5]

On The Media

Globe in Crisis

Friday, June 12, 2009

What’s playing out in Boston is a familiar drama: the sad spectacle of the slow death, by bleeding, of a venerable patriarch. The Globe’s crisis is on one hand remarkable because the paper has been a New England institution and an indispensable element of the democratic process for 137 years. ...

Comments [10]

On The Media

The Inheritance Of Loss

Friday, May 29, 2009

It seems like every week a city in America loses its newspaper. We decided to focus on one, Seattle, to find out what happens afterwards. In March, the 146-year-old Seattle Post-Intelligencer shuttered its print edition. We talk to alt-weekly staffers, neighborhood bloggers,

Comments [1]

On The Media

Tip Calculator

Friday, May 29, 2009

In a recently published memoir, a New York Times Washington-Bureau editor makes a shocking revelation: the Times had a scoop about the Watergate story months before Woodward and Bernstein. Amazingly, and mysteriously, the Times never followed up on the tip. Robert M. Smith, the Times reporter who received ...

Comments [4]

On The Media

Old and New Media Go to Washington

Friday, May 08, 2009

In light of yet another bad week for newspapers, it seems appropriate that a Senate committee held a Future of Journalism hearing. Publisher of the Dallas Morning News Jim Moroney testified there. He explains one idea he raised at the ...

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

Can the Globe stay afloat?

Tuesday, May 05, 2009

The future of the Boston Globe is in peril, as the paper's owner, The New York Times Company, and the unions continue to negotiate. The company is looking for $20 million of cost cuts in order to save the 137-year-old broadsheet. The Globe—one of the biggest names in journalism—is the highest selling paper in New England and the 14th largest in the nation. But its owner has threatened to close up shop if The Globe can't stem losses expected to reach $85 million this year. Joining us to discuss the paper’s fate is Emily Rooney. She is the host of the news show Greater Boston, she also the also hosts the weekly media criticism show, Beat the Press. For a sense of what the city and its readers will lose we are also joined by two devoted Boston Globe readers: David E. Williams of Brookline in Boston and Catherine Bumpus of Woods Hole, Mass.

Comments [1]

On The Media

Pulp Fictions

Friday, May 01, 2009

Throughout journalism there have been the inevitable errors of omission, errant mistakes and occasional misstatements of fact. And then there have been the flat-out, large-scale flagrant lies. Eric Burns, author of All The News Unfit to Print, reintroduces us to a number of prominent journalists who, finding the ...

Comments [15]

The Takeaway

If newspapers are dying, why aren't newspaper movies?

Friday, April 24, 2009

For months, if not years, the plight of the newspaper industry has been well documented. We've certainly covered it on numerous occasions. Circulation is down, reporters are being laid off, papers are being merged. So why is the life of the hard boiled, gritty, grizzled and determined journalist still so intriguing? Two films out now, The State of Play and The Soloist, have newspaper reporters as the central figures. Hollywood is still depicting newspapers as heroes on screen in a year when the industry's struggles have come to a full boil. The Takeaway is joined by New York Times film critic A.O. Scott to ask if these films are suddenly an anachronism.

State of Play opened in theaters last week:



The Soloist opens this weekend:

Comment

The Takeaway

Moral of the story

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

For years, ethicist Randy Cohen has patiently guided readers through moral quagmires in his weekly column in the New York Times "The Ethicist." Now he is branching out from his popular Sunday column and is bringing his moral view to a new arena: The news. He will cast his ethical gaze on hot topics and in the news and discuss their broader moral implications. Randy Cohen joins The Takeaway to discuss his take on Madonna's failed adoption of a little girl in Malawi.

Check out Randy Cohen's column, Moral of the Story, in today's New York Times.

Comment

On The Media

Paper Trail

Friday, April 03, 2009

A recent study by Princeton economics Professor Sam Schulhofer-Wohl showed that the 2007 closure of The Cincinnati Post resulted in lower voter participation and less incumbent turnover in municipal government. Schulhofer-Wohl is careful not to extrapolate but says the results don't bode well for democracy in the age ...

Comments [9]