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Opinion: News Corp Split Means FOX 'News' Where it Belongs

Thursday, June 28, 2012

At least Fox News is now where it belongs - in the world of entertainment.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: The News Corp. Phone Hacking Scandal

Thursday, May 03, 2012

Vanity Fair contributor Sarah Ellison looks at the ongoing fallout from the News Corp. phone hacking scandal and the toll it has taken on Rupert Mudrdoch’s media empire.

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The Takeaway

Rupert Murdoch's State-Side Influence

Wednesday, May 02, 2012

A British Parliamentary committee's report on Rupert Murdoch has declared that the 81-year-old News Corp. CEO "is not a fit person to exercise the stewardship of a major international company." Jess Todtfeld was a Fox News producer for 13 years and now owns a media training company. Todtfeld believes that Murdoch's willingness to invest in the news represents a unique point in the American media landscape.

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The Takeaway

Follow Friday: Immigration at the Supreme Court, News Corp Inquiry, John Edwards Trial, Walmart Bribery

Friday, April 27, 2012

Every Friday, The Takeaway convenes a panel to look back at the week's big stories. This week, we'll hear more about Arizona v. U.S., the case that will determine the constitutionality of Arizona's immigration law, known as SB 1070. James and Rupert Murdoch both testified before a British inquiry into media ethics, our partner The New York Times published a comprehensive investigation into Walmart's practices in Mexico, and the campaign finance case against former Senator John Edwards began in North Carolina. Farai Chideya, journalist and Fellow at Harvard University's Institute of Politics, and Paddy O’Connell host of the BBC’s Broadcasting House program, explain the news of the week.

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The Takeaway

As Murdoch Inquiry Deepens, an American News Corp Shareholder Weighs In

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

New evidence in a judicial inquiry into News Corporation suggests that a senior minister in Prime Minister David Cameron’s government secretly helped Rupert Murdoch expand his global media empire. The British public remains transfixed by the story, but equally concerned are American shareholders of the company. Simon Greer, CEO of Nathan Cummings, News Corp shareholder weighs in from New York.

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The Takeaway

Australian Newspaper Levels New Allegations against Murdoch's News Corp

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

There are new allegations against Rupert Murdoch's news organization and new suspicions of shady tactics in a different industry altogether. An Australian newspaper has published a report that News Corp used a special unit to sabotage its competitors in the TV business. The Australian government has called for a criminal investigation into the claims. Dr. David McKnight is the author of the new book "Murdoch: An Investigation Of Political Power."

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On The Media

Could the News Corp phone-hacking scandal end up in U.S. Courts?

Friday, March 02, 2012

James Murdoch stepped down this week as chief of News International's British newspapers. James' departure followed revelations by British police that the company had bribed multiple public officials and not just at The News of the World but at The Sun tabloid, too. This has renewed speculation over here that the Murdochs may have run afoul of U.S. law, specifically the Watergate-era Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. ProPublica’s Jake Bernstein reminds us what the act is, and explains how the Murdochs could potentially wind up in U.S. courts. 

 

Tom Waits - Jockey Full of Bourbon

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WNYC News

James Murdoch Steps Down as Head of News International

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

James Murdoch announced Wednesday that he’s stepping down as executive chairman of News International, the British newspaper subsidiary of his father Rupert's media empire.

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The Takeaway

James Murdoch to Step Down at News International

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

James Murdoch, son of Rupert Murdoch, has stepped down as executive chairman of News International, the British arm of News Corporation. Murdoch and his role at News International have come under scrutiny amid Britain's expanding phone hacking scandal at Murdoch-owned newspapers such as the now-defunct News of the World.

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On The Media

The Blackberry Defense

Friday, December 16, 2011

Earlier this week it was revealed that James Murdoch received an email in 2008 that suggests Murdoch knew about the scope of the News Corp phone hacking scandal long before he has claimed. But, even though Murdoch replied to the email, he claims he didn't read far enough down the chain to grasp the gravity of the situation. Brooke spoke with author William Powers about the Blackberry defense. 

Aeroc - R+B=?

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The Takeaway

News Corp. Hacking Inquiry Resumes in Britain

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

A inquiry by the British Parliament into the hacking scandal and bribery that lead News Corporation to close the News of the World tabloid resumes today in London. Four present and former employees of News International, News Corporation's British newspaper subsidiary, are testifying over what News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch and his son James, who runs the conglomerate's European and Asian operations, knew about phone hacking and other illegal activities at News of the World. Will today's revelations conflict with the Murdochs' testimony to Parliament in July? John Burns, London bureau chief for The New York Times, is listening to the hearings.

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It's A Free Country ®

London is Burning, but Austerity Measures Aren't to Blame

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

In a month of street riots, budget cuts and sovereign debt crises in London, it’s hard to resist comparisons to Greece – and indeed, if you read much of the coverage in the U.S. media it would seem that London is in the grips of a raging anti-austerity protest. But while the closure of youth programs may leave more troubled teenagers idling in town centers, it doesn’t make them anti-austerity protesters.

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The Takeaway

CNN Host Piers Morgan Denies Phone Hacking Allegations

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Before American audiences knew him as Larry King's replacement on CNN and a panelist on "America's Got Talent," Piers Morgan had a long career as a British tabloid journalist, during which he served as an editor at The News of the World and The Daily Mirror. The News of the World was closed in the fallout from the phone hacking and police bribery scandal that continues to envelop parent company News Corporation, and the Mirror's corporate parent announced this week that it is opening an investigation into whether hacking took place at it's newspapers. Last week, Conservative MP Louise Mensch alleged that Morgan was aware of hacking during his tenure at both tabloids. The BBC's Jon Manel reports on the latest.

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The Takeaway

Trinity Mirror Opens Phone Hacking Investigation

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Following the phone hacking scandal at its rival News International, the Trinity Mirror newspaper group in the U.K. has announced that it will lead a review into its own editorial practices. The publisher's stock price fell 9.8 percent on Monday, following allegations that phone hacking also took place at The Daily Mirror. Sarah Lyall, who has a front page profile of Rupert Murdoch in today's New York Times, has the latest from London.

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WNYC News

Financial 411: Gauging Reaction to the News Corp. Scandal in New York

Thursday, July 21, 2011

News Corp.'s troubles in Great Britain are of particular interest to about 6,000 New Yorkers. We'll talk about how people at the Wall Street Journal and Fox News see the unfolding scandal.

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The Takeaway

After The Takeaway: John Hockenberry Questions the Implications of the News Corp. Scandal

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

After today’s show, The Takeaway’s co-host John Hockenberry reacts to the larger implications of the News Corp. phone hacking scandal. In this video, Hockenberry speaks to the question of government control of the press, and what Rupert Murdoch’s legacy may mean for the future of American journalism. He acknowledges that watching the “Shakespearian” fall of Murdoch and his empire has been entertaining, but urges us not to overlook the severity of the larger situation, suggesting that this story might prove to be bad news for reporters around the globe. 

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The Takeaway

The Murdochs Testify Before British Parliament

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

News Corporation founder Rupert Murdoch, his son James, and former News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks were questioned for hours by British lawmakers yesterday morning. "Sorry" became the theme of the day, as the three apologized profusely for the phone hacking scandal, though Murdoch did say he was not aware it was taking place. Around noon, an attacker threw a pie at Murdoch. 

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The Takeaway

Cameron Faces Parliament Over Ties to News Corp.

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

"You don't make decisions in hindsight, you make them in the present," British Prime Minister David Cameron told an unruly special session of Parliament this morning. "You live and you learn, and believe you me, I have learnt."

The day after News Corporation CEO Rupert Murdoch, arguably one of the most powerful men in Britain, defended himself and his company over charges of hacking and bribery at his newspapers, Britain's leader faced Parliament to defend his ties to the Murdoch organization. 

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The Takeaway

Update: The Latest from David Cameron's Parliament Appearance

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Prime Minister David Cameron has been appearing before Parliament this morning, defending himself over his ties to News Corporation and the hacking and bribery allegations that have enveloped the company. Cameron vowed the current investigation would widen to include the entire British media. The BBC's Robin Brant reports with the latest on Cameron's appearance.

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The Takeaway

The Power Behind the Murdoch Family's Shareholding Clout

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Yesterday, News Corp. shares rose 6 percent after reports circulated that some of the company's board members want to replace Rupert Murdoch with Charles "Chase" Carey, president, COO, and deputy chairman of the company. Murdoch would still remain chairman, though, which begs the question: would a new CEO bring about change in the way that News Corp. is governed?

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