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New York State Redistricting

The Brian Lehrer Show

Ed Koch's Last Campaign

Friday, February 01, 2013

Liz Benjamin, host of Capital Tonight, blogger, talks about Ed Koch and New York Uprising, the campaign to get state legislators to pledge to reform redistricting.

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The Empire

With minimal changes, federal court accepts magistrate's congressional maps

Monday, March 19, 2012

Courtesy of the Eastern District Court.

As expected, Magistrate Judge Roanne Mann's proposed congressional map plan today. With only a few minor changes, the three-judge court accepted the 27 districts where candidates seeking to be on the primary ballot June 26 will be able to begin collecting signatures tomorrow.

"In the face of an outdated congressional districting plan, the application of which
would plainly violate the requirements of federal law, and of the New York legislature’s
complete abdication of its congressional redistricting duty, this court is obliged not only to
recognize a violation of law but also to create a new redistricting plan to ensure against the
disenfranchisement of state voters in the 2012 congressional elections," the judges wrote in their judgement.

The changes made by the three judges can be seen below after the jump.

Plaintiffs in the case, in particular the lawyers working on behalf of the Senate Republicans, had argued before the three-judge court that Mann should have taken the present districts' cores and incumbents into account in her maps. Additionally, a number of arguments before the court sought for specific communities--namely the African American community in Harlem; the Dominic and Latino communities in northern Manhattan, the Bronx and northern Queens; and the Jewish community in southern Brooklyn--to get districts they felt were fairer. The court rejected all these arguments.

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The Empire

5 Cuomo 'Big Ugly' Legislation Highlights

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Courtesy of the Governor's office

It began at 7 pm on Wednesday and wasn’t finished until after 7 am on Thursday, but Governor Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders have hammered out the details on the Governor’s five-point policy agenda for this year’s budget. They're calling the franken-legislation 'The Big Ugly.' Here's what it all means, and who's is and is NOT pleased.

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The Empire

'The Capitol Pressroom' with Susan Arbetter

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Today on "The Capitol Pressroom":

Governor Andrew Cuomo joins us with reaction to deals on pension reform, redistricting, teacher evaluations, DNA, casino gambling amendment.

PEF’s Kenneth Brynien is none too pleased with pension reforms. He will be here just prior to a union rally against Tier VI at the Capitol.

Upstate Assemblywoman Claudia Tenney is also an unhappy camper. Her district is so bizarrely shaped that she submitted her own proposal to Governor Cuomo.

We have a Gaggle of Goo Goos including NYPIRG’s Russ Haven & Bill Mahoney; the League of Women Voters’ Barbara Bartoletti & Dick Dadey of the Citizens Union.

For show archives, please visit The Capitol Bureau's website here.

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The Empire

'The Capitol Pressroom' with Susan Arbetter

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Today on "The Capitol Pressroom":

While unions of all stripes continue a full court press against the Governor’s pension reforms, the Empire Center for New York State Policy is out with a poll today indicating a majority of public school teachers support at least some of the pension revisions the Governor is pushing for. Tim Hoefer joins us with the details.

More aid is on the way to victims of flooding in upstate NY.

Common Cause’s Susan Lerner returns with redistricting analysis, as well as what she says are the significant differences between the judicially and legislatively drawn maps.

The Senate Democratic Minority says sure it might be Sunshine Week everywhere else, but here in the murky world of Senate Republican power, things have gotten Duma-like. Senator Liz Kruger, the ranking Dem on the Finance Committee, joins us to discuss this and other issues including redistricting and reproductive rights.

Students and faculty from SUNY and CUNY are asking lawmakers to reverse the decline caused by 3 years of budget cuts totaling almost $2 billion. NYPIRG’s Bill Mahoney, UUP’s Marc Dearstyne of SUNY Cortland and Buffalo State student Alex Bornemisza join us with details.

For show archives, please visit The Capitol Bureau's website here.

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The Empire

Legislative minority Caucus vows to vote against redistricting proposal

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Karen DeWitt / NYS Public Radio

The Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus--made up of members of both the state Senate and Assembly--released a statement Wednesday saying it plans to vote against the legislative redistricting proposal.

"These lines crack and pack minorities with blatant disregard to communities of interest and in some instances county lines," the statement said. "The Caucus sees it as an unparalleled power grab by the Senate Republicans to maintain their current strong holds and dilute the power of minority communities. Although it has been the traditional practice to allow each house of the legislature to determine its own lines, standing idly by as theses lines are proposed would be an injustice to our constituents."

The caucus is led by Brooklyn Democratic Assemblyman Karim Camara.

The announcement comes in anticipation of a vote on the proposal, drawn up by the majority parties in the Senate and Assembly, this week. While the Caucus members from the Senate are all in the minority party, the 34 members from the Assembly could be a problem for the Democratic leadership. Assembly Republicans, joined by the Caucus and other Democrats who have vowed to vote against the lines, could form a large enough bloc to strike down the proposal.

Members of the Caucus are holding a press conference at 10:30 am and we'll update this post after.

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The Empire

Congressional plan finalized by federal judge--updated

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Courtesy of the Eastern District Court.

Federal magistrate judge Roanne Mann posted her final recommended congressional maps online late Monday. The plans show only slight changes from the original draft maps. Most notably, Mann reconfigured the Voting Rights Act-protected majority black districts in Brooklyn. Local lawmakers and community organizers were upset over the first set of maps they say unfairly divided communities that had traditionally been represented in the same district.

Mann's new maps appear to rejoin the Fort Greene and Clinton Hill neighborhoods with the western-most district currently represented by Congressman Ed Towns.

Participants in the federal case that kick-started the court's drawing of new congressional lines will have until Wednesday to file their objections. The three-judge panel will convene on Thursday March 15 and hold a public hearing to receive feedback on the proposal. The anticipation is the court will vote agree on lines before the start of petitioning for the congressional primary on March 20.

Meanwhile, New York's legislature has put forth maps for its own set of seats. No congressional plan has been presented by lawmakers, which may be the final sign the legislature is abdicating its constitutional responsibility to draw the state's congressional lines.

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The Empire

Cuomo: Magistrate's congressional lines '98 percent' the same as legislature's proposals

Monday, March 12, 2012

Late on Sunday, the state legislature finally released their plans for new Senate and Assembly districts. While the public hasn’t been shown any actual maps as of this writing, Governor Andrew Cuomo took to the airwaves to weigh in on the proposal.

“They put forth lines. They consulted with my people in redoing the lines. They made changes. They lines are far from perfect but I believe they made progress on the lines,” Cuomo said.

While the Governor did promise a veto of the lines if the total package—“better” lines, a constitutional amendment to change future redistricting, and a statute that would put the process change into law—he warned those who see a veto as the best chance for seeing the best lines possible.

"I bet you they're 98 percent the same,” Cuomo said, suggesting that the Assembly and Senate proposals for congress were the starting points for the magistrate’s lines.

Really? Let’s take a quick run through, courtesy of the CUNY Graduate Center’s Center for Urban Research, of some examples to test that claim.

Here’s Long Island—the Assembly’s plan, the Senate’s Plan and the magistrate’s plan.

You'll notice that in both legislative maps, and more so in the Senate's map, the districts on Long Island are drawn north to south. In the magistrate's maps the districts are east to west, and are significantly more compact.

Here’s Western New York, same comparison.

The biggest difference between in these maps I think is how the magistrate handled the Buffalo area. Unlike the Assembly and Senate maps, the Buffalo area is wholly inside its own district, instead of being divided up in the legislative maps. Likewise the Pennsylvania border area in Western New York is in one district in the magistrates plan, versus two in each of the legislators' maps.

“It certainly doesn't appear like the courts maps are…close to anything that exists or have been proposed, with the exception of Common Cause's maps,” said Steven Romalewski, director of the mapping services at CUNY.

There has been considerable debate about the quality and fairness of the lines—as the Governor pointed out—but one thing is for certain: the only thing that’s 98 percent similar between the magistrate’s maps and the state legislators is the fact they’re all drawn in New York State.

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The Empire

'The Capitol Pressroom' with Susan Arbetter

Thursday, March 08, 2012

Today on "The Capitol Pressroom":

Political Science Professor Dr. Gerry Benjamin of SUNY New Paltz joins us with some thoughts on the provisions that we should look for –- and look out for -- in a possible constitutional amendment on redistricting.

Barbara Bartoletti of the League of Women Voters shares her analysis of the Congressional lines as they currently stand.

Monica Arias Miranda, President and CEO of the Hispanic Coalition NY, announced this week she is running for State Senate in the 46th District to unseat incumbent Neil Breslin.

How information is made available online "fundamentally controls what can be done with it", according to the Sunlight Foundation. Today we meet Sean Brady, President of Prism Decision Systems, who is pushing New York State to create an open data portal which provides users with data in "non-proprietary formats". What's that mean? Why is it important? And how would it differ from NY's current open government initiatives?

For show archives, please visit The Capitol Bureau's website here.

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The Empire

'The Capitol Pressroom' with Susan Arbetter

Wednesday, March 07, 2012

Today on "The Capitol Pressroom":

Analysis of Super Tuesday’s results, and the latest on congressional redistricting with Bruce Gyory and Dave Catalfamo.

Senator Tony Avella (D-Queens) is demanding public hearings on legislation having to do with gas drilling in New York.

Assemblywoman Ellen Jaffee (D-Suffern) of Rockland County is angry over an attempt by United Water to use her in its push to build a desalination plant in Haverstraw.

For show archives, please visit The Capitol Bureau's website here.

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The Empire

Koch emails legislators: Don't take a deal on redistricting

Wednesday, March 07, 2012

Former Mayor Ed Koch with Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney (Colby Hamilton / WNYC)

Former New York City mayor Ed Koch launched the latest salvo in the deal-or-no-deal redistricting battle. Koch, who pushed lawmakers during the last election to sign pledges supporting an independent redistricting process, is calling on them now to reject any sort of deal that would see a promise to pass a constitutional amendment in exchange for Governor Andrew Cuomo's signing the lines into law.

"A constitutional amendment is worthy of support on its own, of course, but not at the expense of improved lines now," Koch writes. "That is only good for the people who are counting on Albany staying exactly the way it is for another decade, but most New Yorkers think that's far too long. Voting for anything less than a 2012 independent commission would violate the pledge that so many lawmakers signed and campaigned on.

"We know there is a lot of pressure on you to support such a deal, or there will be. But if you still stand by your original pledge, as we hope you do, you should oppose it. And if it passes anyway and Governor Cuomo vetoes it, we hope you will sustain that veto."

Koch, of course, has been burned before by those who promised an independent process this time around. This might be more of a shot across the bow of those senators and members of the assembly who signed the NY Uprising pledge during their campaign and who Koch now labels "Enemies of Reform."

The full letter is after the jump.

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The Empire

Are these New York's future congressional lines?

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

With the release of her draft maps, magistrate judge Roanne Mann moved the congressional redistricting process forward in a major way. But these aren't the first set of maps that have been the focus of intense speculation. Most recently the senate and assembly both presented the courts with plans that got treated with significant interest by the the media, commentators and the public.

A number of people, including potential candidates for congress, have referred to these lines in relation to the state legislature's own process for redrawing maps.

"We should not jump to the conclusion that these will be the final lines, as the state legislature may yet come to an agreement on a map that would supersede the proposal released today," said Tom Wilson, who has been playing a run against Republican Congresswoman Nan Hayworth in the Hudson Valley.

"We sincerely hope that Albany gets its act together and agrees on more sensible congressional lines so that the Special Master's proposal doesn't become law," said The Woodhaven Residents' Block Association after seeing their neighborhood divide between two districts in Mann's plan.

Which raises the question, are these the lines we'll have for the next ten years?

The answer could be yes. First, a note on the schedule for the court's process. All the groups and individuals involved in the Favors case Judge Mann is presiding over need to have written comments on her proposal in by 9 am tomorrow, March 7. There's been speculation she may call the parties back into court to discuss what they say later this week.

But what's certain is the magistrate judge will have a revised, final set of proposed maps to the three-judge panel overseeing this whole process by Monday, March 12. Then, the parties will again be able to comment on the maps directly to the three-judge panel before the panel meets on March 15. The expectation is that a final decision on the maps will be made shortly thereafter, as petitioning to get on the congressional primary ballot begins two weeks from today.

There remains an outside chance the legislature could step up and pass congressional maps before the three-judge panel does next week. It would require not only passing the maps, but changing the date of the congressional primary from June 26 to a later date. The federal judge that set the June date, Judge Sharpe, left the door open for this to happen, but so far the senate and assembly have been unable to come to an agreement on a date.

Oh, yeah: the legislature also needs to get both the Department of Justice to sign off on the maps--something they have up to 60 days to do--and Governor Andrew Cuomo to sign them. He's promised to veto maps if they remain "hyper-partisan."

Common Cause's Susan Lerner praised the maps, calling the proposal "a vast improvement over the self-serving interests of the Legislature," while Citizens Union's Dick Dadey said, "The Congressional maps presented today by the court show that an independent process can produce better districts than those drawn by the legislature." Were these the sort of hypo-partisan maps the Governor was imagining?

Still, according to one line of thinking, it might come down to whether or not the congressional delegation is all that unhappy about the maps. Some, like Representative Gary Ackerman, have signaled they're fine with what's presented and are ready to run. Others, like Congressman Jerry Nadler, barely saw their districts move. Others still, like a good chunk of the Long Island delegation, might simply see the redrawn districts as good enough and move in.

In a sense, it may come down to whether or not a critical mass develops among the delegation; if there's not a fight from them for better lines, should the state legislature even bother?

So far, it's uncertain where things stand on this point. Both Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and Senate Majority Leader, through a spokesman, have indicated they'd still like to make a deal on congressional districts. They'd better hurry. Time's running out.

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The Empire

Assemblyman Lancman fine with proposed minority-majority 6th Congressional District

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

Just hours after a federal judge's proposed congressional maps were picked up by the media, Assemblyman Rory Lancman, who had intended to run against Republican Congressman Bob Turner, saw himself drawn into an entirely new district--one without an incumbent--in the judge's plans.

The Special Master’s lines came out today, and while I can’t predict what the final lines will ultimately look like, the Special Master’s district six is centered around my home and communities that I have represented in the Assembly, on the community board and as a civic leader for over twenty years. I look forward to the opportunity to run for Congress when the lines are finalized.

Let's take a look at that proposed 6th district. For starters, this appears to be pretty close to the district AALDEF and other community groups proposed District 5 in their UNITY map:

Courtesy of AALDEF

And the court's District 6 map:

A quick look at the voting age population of the new district:
White: 39.9%
Hispanic: 17.1%
Black: 4.8%
Asian: 38.8%

Which is all to say, the district's voting age population in majority minority, and the largest chunk in that group is the Asian community. It will be interesting, if these lines become real, to see how that dynamic shapes the candidates in the race.

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The Empire

Federal judge releases draft congressional maps--updated

Tuesday, March 06, 2012

Courtesy of the Eastern District Court.

Yesterday, federal magistrate judge Roanne Mann held a hearing to review the proposed congressional maps submitted by the state assembly and senate, as well as groups like Common Cause. Much of the hearing was over the scope the parties hoped the judge would take--the legislative houses and others pushed the judge to make the scope narrower, to look at the existing districts as starting points, and to consider incumbency.

Well, Judge Mann worked fast: below are the draft congressional maps released by the court late last night. And as you can see the judge appears to have decided ignored both the state senate and assembly's draft maps for downstate districts.

Some highlights from the city:

  • The Asian community centered in Flushing would have an Asian-influenced district in Queens.
  • The seat occupied by Bob Turner would cross into Nassau, and would also take on the entire Rockaway Peninsula--and pair Turner with Meeks (h/t Colin Campbell at Politicker)
  • Colin and I both stand corrected by Queens' own Evan Stavisky. Via Twitter: "Rep. Meeks' district was NOT combined with Turner. Turner's section of the Rockaways was just added to Rep. Meeks' district."

  • The Towns district stretches all the way to Coney Island.
  • Grimm's district would move further into Bay Ridge, picking up some of Sheepshead Bay in the process.
  • Maloney's district would gobble up the Williamsburg/Greenpoint neighborhoods in North Brooklyn, taking them out of Rep. Nydia Velázquez's district.
  • Charlie Rangel's district would remain in Manhattan, moving from the upper west to the upper east side of the island, but would continue the trend of being majority Latino.
  • It looks like the court decided to, more than anyone, blow up both the Turner and Ackerman seats.
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The Empire

The three most important pieces of New York's ongoing redistricting saga

Monday, March 05, 2012

Federal magistrate judge Roanne Mann is bringing together the sides with skin in the redistricting game today at a hearing to review legislative and community activist proposals for how the state’s 27 congressional districts could be drawn.

The hearing comes as state lawmakers and Governor Andrew Cuomo are reportedly in the midst of trying to hammer out a deal that would see better lines for the Governor to pass alongside a constitutional amendment to change the redistricting process going forward.
But as Jimmy Vielkind of the Albany Times-Union reports, the process is far from finalized:

Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who denounced LATFOR's first draft of lines as "hyper-political," is wielding the threat of a gubernatorial veto to make lawmakers agree to a new law and changes to the State Constitution that would rip the map-making pen from legislators themselves.

Assembly Democrats outlined a draft package of possible changes last week, the Times Union reported Thursday, but the new system still allows for final revisions by legislators — something that has left some good-government advocates uneasy.

A Cuomo administration source said Sunday that there was no overall agreement, and as such, "if they are drafting now then they are drafting for a veto."

Even as the redistricting morass continues, three distinct pieces of the overall puzzle should be watched closely:

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The Empire

'The Capitol Pressroom' with Susan Arbetter

Monday, March 05, 2012

Today on "The Capitol Pressroom":

According to State Senator Mike Gianaris, he's been consistently outspoken on government reform whether serving in the Senate or Assembly. On today’s Capitol Pressroom, the Queens Democrat discusses Cuomo's comments, today’s New York Times editorial, and the defensive stance taken on Friday by Assemblyman Jack McEneny, a fellow Democrat and the Assembly co-chair of LATFOR, upon learning of Gianaris’ criticism of a constitutional amendment in-the-making.

Siena Pollster Steve Greenberg returns, wielding data.

We hear what former Republican gubernatorial candidate John Faso has to say about relationships, specifically the one between Republicans and women in light of Rush Limbaugh’s latest comments.

Adam Lisberg, editor of City & State New York shares highlights from the latest issue of the paper, including a story about increasing highway & bridge tolls in order to pay for transportation infrastructure.

For show archives, please visit The Capitol Bureau's website here.

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The Empire

State Assembly: Our redistricting amendment is better than Gianaris'

Friday, March 02, 2012

This article has been updated.

From left, Assemb. Jack McEneny, Sen. Michael Nozzolio and Sen. Martin Malavé Dilan (Colby Hamilton / WNYC)

Assembly Speaker Shelly Silver’s press office just released a statement on behalf of Assemblyman Jack McEneny, the Albany-based Democrat representing the Assembly’s Democratic majority in the state’s redistricting process. The statement, according to McEneny, is in response to the criticism being levied against the reported language of a constitutional amendment that appeared this morning in the Albany Times-Union. The amendment would be part of a compromise that would allow the Governor to sign a second, supposedly improved set of district lines for the state senate and assembly.

The statement appears to put daylight between what Assemblyman McEneny described in the TU article, and some of the push back coming from Senate Democrats, in particular Senator Michael Gianaris, who was the co-sponsor of a bill last year to establish an independent redistricting process in 2012:

While we share a common goal of permanently reforming New York’s redistricting process, the constitutional amendment currently being discussed by the Assembly is stronger than the Senate Minority’s proposal in several key respects. Future redistricting plans will be subjected to tough standards not contained in the plan put forth by the Senate Minority and, as well, the amendment would be accompanied by a statute implementing those changes.

According to the statement, in the event the plan drawn by the future “independent commission” was rejected by the legislature, lawmakers would “be limited to those that affect no more than two percent of the population of the district being altered, making it much harder to modify the commission’s proposals.”

The statement goes on to say the Assembly proposal would “provide crucial protections for language and for racial minorities,” as well as require a justification for district population deviations, and give greater restriction to political activities for the commission members.

The statement comes after a day of push back from lawmakers and good government activists incensed over the details of a possible constitutional amendment on redistricting.

Common Cause held a conference call earlier to discuss the status of both congressional and state redistricting efforts. The group’s executive director Susan Lerner addressed the constitutional amendment issue.

“We would just like to say we have consistently been calling for an open discussion about what should be in any constitutional amendment,” she said, according to City and State’s Laura Nahmias. “We think quite frankly it would be a scandal if massive changes to the redistricting process were introduced under cover of darkness.”

Democratic state Senator Liz Krueger issued her own statement on the state of the process saying, “The reports I have heard of a deal on a constitutional amendment make two things clear: the proposed amendment is too weak to work, and New York's voters would have to accept ten more years of hyperpartisan, racially discriminatory maps to get this too-little, too-late reform.”

And earlier today, Democratic state Senator Michael Gianaris told the Empire, “The entire point about the constitutional amendment is that we could change [the ability of the legislature to have the final say over the lines]. So to actually enshrine in the constitution that the legislature would have the final say would be regress.”

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The Empire

Federal judge lays out the rules for March 5 redistricting hearing

Friday, March 02, 2012

At the end of today, everyone who has skin in the congressional redistricting game will need to have their proposals for new lines into Judge Roanne Mann. In preparation for the hearing on Monday, March 5, Judge Mann has laid out the ground rules for those who'll present their arguments on Monday:

Given the March 12th deadline by which this Court must issue its report and recommendation on a new Congressional redistricting plan for the State of New York, as well as the number of parties and non-parties providing input into the process and expected to participate in the proceeding scheduled for Monday, it was not the Court’s intention to conduct a trial-type evidentiary hearing on March 5th.  Instead, the hearing will proceed in the manner herein described.

Each group of parties will be given up to twenty (20) minutes to present its argument to the Court.  Counsel representing parties with similar interests are encouraged to decide in advance which attorney will address a particular issue; the Court will not entertain repetitive arguments.  Each party group may reserve up to three (3) minutes of its time to present a brief response, at the conclusion of the party presentations, to the other parties’ arguments.  Such responses must be limited to correcting misstatements of fact or law, and may not include new or repetitive affirmative arguments.

Time permitting, interested non-parties who have submitted proposed plans or substantive comments and have registered by today’s deadline may be afforded up to five (5) minutes to address the Court.  Non-parties and organizations with affiliated interests are encouraged to select one representative to speak on their behalf for the allotted time.  Non-party presentations must be limited to the topic of New York State Congressional redistricting.

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The Empire

Cuomo takes a swipe at lawmakers over redistricting

Friday, March 02, 2012

This article's been updated.

Courtesy of the Governor's office.

Governor Andrew Cuomo, appearing on Fred Dicker's TALK 1300-WGDJ show this morning, took a swipe at state legislators--in particular Democratic Senator Michael Gianaris--who have been vocally critical during this year's redistricting process. Dicker and the Governor were talking about news reports of a possible constitutional amendment deal when the subject turned to the language of the amendment.

Dicker mentioned the amendment details reported today in the Times-Union appear to be similar to those in a bill sponsored last year by Gianaris. It would have replaced the current legislative-controlled redistricting process with one where the minority parties had more of a say, among other things. The language of the constitutional amendment, as described by T-U and pointed out on this blog, is somewhat similar. Gianaris says he's opposed to a constitutional amendment that would keep the legislature involved in the redistricting process.

"There's been a lot of debate on a constitutional amendment, a lot of drafts," the Governor said. "I think Gianaris had something to do with the draft when he had a different position on the issue."

The comment elicited a chuckle from Dicker.

The Governor and others have been critical of legislators, and specifically Senate Democrats, for not being more proactive on the issue of redistricting when they had the chance.

"It's the convenient politics of the time, let's be honest," Cuomo said about the contentious debate over the process this year. "When the Democrats were in the majority, I didn't see them pass redistricting reform, right? They had the opportunity to do this. They're now all talking about how it should work--well why didn't you pass the bill when you were in the majority?"

Reached by phone for a comment, Gianaris said, "My legislative proposal was required by the constitution to have the legislature have the final say. The entire point about the constitutional amendment is that we could change that. So to actually enshrine in the constitution that the legislature would have the final say would be regress.

Cuomo also gave an update on the overall redistricting process, and the talks happening to reach a consensus: "Basically, we're nowhere."

He went on to further discuss his position in the process, which other blogs have picked up on:

"If there were acceptable lines—not the current lines, which are unacceptable—if there were acceptable lines, and if there was a real constitutional amendment, and if there was statutory language that could protect the people if the legislature changes their mind and doesn't want to pass a constitutional amendment, then that would be a possible resolution," the Governor said.

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'The Capitol Pressroom' with Susan Arbetter

Friday, March 02, 2012

Today on "The Capitol Pressroom":

Ken Lovett of the New York Daily News updates us on the latest redistricting news. And over which issue George Takei is threatening to debate Donald Trump.

Former AG Bob Abrams says he has the answer to the redistricting question.

The Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act or RLUIPA has combined two topics, prisoners and zoning and it's creating a burden on municipalities in the lower Hudson Valley. Patty Salkin, the Dean of the Government Law Center at Albany Law School and a land use expert joins us to explain. Plus we will speak with a documentary filmmaker Anne MacGregor who has produced a film "America's Holy War" about the issue.

And the town of Vestal is definitely *not* all pro-gas drilling. Sue Rapp will explain.

For show archives, please visit The Capitol Bureau's website here.

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