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New York State Legislature

WNYC News

Cuomo to Lawmakers: Pass Ethics Reform or No Budget

Monday, February 02, 2015

The governor made the ultimatum as he unveiled his own 5-point ethics reform plan.

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WNYC News

Poll: Cuomo's Approval Down, Following New Gun Law

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Governor Cuomo’s championing of strict new gun control laws in New York has taken a toll on his popularity. A new Quinnipiac University poll finds that for the first time since taking office, Cuomo’s approval rating has dropped significantly.

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WNYC News

Cuomo Offers Conditional Support for Senate Coalition

Wednesday, December 05, 2012

Governor Cuomo, who has maintained that he has stayed out of the Senate leadership fight, is now endorsing a newly formed coalition of Senate Republicans and five Democrats, but with some conditions.

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WNYC News

Control of NY State Senate Could Come Down to the Wire

Thursday, October 25, 2012

This election will determine whether Democrats or Republicans control the State Senate in the next term, and it could come down to just a few hundred votes in a small number of key Senate contests. Both sides are hopeful that they will be victorious.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

New York's Minimum Wage Debate

Monday, April 23, 2012

Nicole Gelinas, contributing editor of the Manhattan Institute's City Journal, and Paul Sonn, legal co-director of the National Employment Law Project, provide the pros and cons of the New York state legislature's proposed minimum wage increase.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

A Little Ugly in Albany

Friday, March 16, 2012

Karen DeWitt, Capitol bureau chief for New York State Public Radio and Ken Lovett, Albany bureau chief of The Daily News, wrap up the flurry of legislation in Albany. 

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The Empire

LATFOR draft maps are released for both Senate and Assembly--updated

Thursday, January 26, 2012

The wait is over!

Draft maps have been placed on the New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment website. A statement from the task force, co-chaired by Republican Senator Michael Nozzolio and Democratic Assemblyman John McEneny, called the plan "fair, legal and protects minority voting interests."

Not surprisingly, Senate Democrats are not taking the lines well.

"This Republican proposal contains none of the criteria reformers sought and none of the reforms the Governor included in his proposed legislation," Senate Minority Leader John Sampson said in a statement "The Republican-proposed districts are not compact, vary widely in population, and divide communities of interest in blatantly political ways."

Former mayor Ed Koch, who saw Senate Republicans renege on their promise of an independent, non-partisan redistricting process, is also blasting the plans.

"No surprise, I am disappointed in this result and in the dishonorable lawmakers who openly pledged to do things differently this year, and then reneged when it wasn't to their political advantage. What a shame: this is not reform in letter or in spirit," Koch said in a statement. "Today, victory lies with the Enemies of Reform."

He called on Governor Cuomo to keep his promise of vetoing maps that were not independently drawn an overtly partisan.

Governor Cuomo ran for office pledging to reform the way our state works, and to date, he's kept his word," Koch said. "Just this afternoon the Governor said his position has not changed, which I applaud him for, and I have every confidence he will keep his word to the people of New York and veto the proposed maps."

The images for the Senate districts are below. The Assembly districts are after the jump:

New York City's proposed Senate lines ( )

Long Island's proposed Senate lines ( )

Upstate New York's proposed Senate lines ( )

[caption id="attachment_13468" align="center" width="620" caption="New York City's proposed Assembly lines" credit=" "]

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The Empire

Cuomo poll numbers remain high, as voters turn a corner on state's direction

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Governor Andrew Cuomo can't get high enough. At least not with votes.

Which is to say: according to a new NY1/YNN-Marist poll, 58 percent of New Yokers surveyed approve of the job the Governor's doing. This is up from 55 percent in the previous NY1/YNN-Marist.

New Yorker's are also feeling better about the direction the state's headed in. For the first time in nearly a decade, a majority of voters--52 percent--feel the state is moving in the right direction. The last time this was the case? 2002.

“This represents a dramatic shift in public sentiment after a decade of frustration,” said Dr. Lee M. Miringoff, Director of The Marist College Institute for Public Opinion, in a statement. “Positive reaction to Governor Cuomo is influencing how voters feel about the future of New York.”

Other highlights from the poll:

  • 65 percent of registered voters in New York approve of how Governor Andrew Cuomo is handling the state’s budget
  • Half of those polled now support allowing non-Indian gambling in New York, down from 60 percent in November
  • The State Senate's approval numbers are up 7 points to 19 percent last November
  • The Assembly also saw a bump, but smaller: 24 percent approve, up 4 points from before

The survey of 681 New York State adults was conducted on January 18th and 19th, with a margin of plus or minus of 4 percentage points. There were 554 registered voters in the pool, their subset having a margin of plus or minus 4.5 percent.

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The Empire

Beyond red and blue: Redistricting and the deeper fight for 'nonpartisan' lines

Monday, October 03, 2011

Assemblyman McEneny, left, and Senator Nozzolio, right, at the Manhattan LATFOR meeting earlier this month. (Courtesy of the LATFOR Committee.)

Depending on where you stand, the decennial redistricting process can be synonymous with high-stakes political gamesmanship, craven partisan manipulation, or the most boring of insider political baseball. Regardless of which version you favor, it's usually cast through the two-toned prism of Republican versus Democratic interests battling it out for control of political turf.

But that blue or red-hued view often overlooks the regional and demographic dimensions of redistricting. For starters, there are significant differences between the interests of upstate and downstate New York that go beyond just the typical partisan split.

“Downstate, the focus can sometimes shift to…a demographic point of view," said Ryan Moses, former New York State Republican Party executive director and currently partner with the Albany-based political consulting firm Capitol Public Strategies. “Which is a little different from upstate, where the population is less diverse, but just more focused on making sure it [redistricting] makes more sense geographically."

Typically the divide is along partisan lines, with upstate, often Republican-leaning areas more concerned with the way towns and counties are divided, and downstate, often Democratic-leaning districts taking racially and ethnically-based “communities of interests” into account. But the partisanship, says Moses, is only part of the political picture.

“There's politics at play there,” he said. “Maybe not Republican-Democrat politics, but certainly ethnic politics, which, in New York, as you know, is a big factor."

Downstate racial and ethnic interests are hoping to become even bigger factors in the redistricting process. In a sense, this is a one-shot process: political lines are being drawn for the next ten years, and this is a singular opportunity to get what they see as their rightful slice of the political pie. For them, the partisanship is secondary, which puts them directly in the path of the traditional redistricting process.

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WNYC News

Dramatic Week for Same-Sex Marriage Ends in Stalemate Over Bill

Friday, June 17, 2011

A vote in the state Senate on gay marriage is not expected until next week, as Republicans, who hold the majority in that house, wrangle with concerns over greater protections for religious organizations.

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WNYC News

Bloomberg Lobbies GOP Senators on Marriage Equality

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Mayor Mike Bloomberg is the latest elected official to lobby Republicans in the New York State Senate to pass a bill to legalize gay marriage. Bloomberg said he told GOP senators who have been leaning against voting for same-sex marriage that, in the end, they will be on the wrong side of history if they do not change their minds and vote yes this session.

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WNYC News

On the Road, Cuomo Pushes Legislative Agenda

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Governor Andrew Cuomo is wrapping up the first week of his statewide tour to tout his legislative agenda and taunt the legislature.  With stops in Syracuse and Buffalo so far, Cuomo has been talking up his agenda for a property tax cap, ethics reform and gay marriage while dressing down the legislature and the Capitol’s political culture.

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WNYC News

Duffy Stands In for Cuomo at Gay Marriage Rally

Monday, May 09, 2011

New York's Lieutenant Governor Robert Duffy told a major gay marriage rally at the State Capitol that his boss, Governor Andrew Cuomo, remains committed to the issue.

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It's A Free Country ®

Gun Control: Closing Loopholes or Restricting Access?

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

WNYC

I can't believe that Arizona would even think about putting a firearm in the atmosphere of a college. I cannot start to tell you the level of really responsible thinking and shaping your mind that goes into, even a police officer, getting a firearm.

Eric Adams, State Senator for the 20th District of New York on the Brian Lehrer Show

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WNYC News

Cuomo, in First State of State Speech, Vows Break From Tradition

Tuesday, January 04, 2011

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is expected use Wednesday's State of the State address to detail how he plans to tackle New York's fiscal crisis. Cuomo said he would use the address as a forum to discuss his specific plans for the state, including an expected call for a freeze in state worker salaries.

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WNYC News

In Albany, Republicans Eye Greater Influence in Legislature

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

The state’s Republican Party suffered some major blows in this month’s elections, losing the governor’s office and all other statewide posts. But the GOP did make gains in the legislature that could leave the party with a power base in charge of the State Senate and deprive Democrats of a veto-proof majority in the Assembly.

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