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Transportation Nation

How the New Haven Line Got the Deep Freeze

Monday, October 07, 2013

WSHU

Now that Metro North's New Haven Line is operating on a normal schedule for the first time in nearly two weeks, some are asking how the system was so vulnerable that a failure on a single power feeder line could cause such a problem.

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Transportation Nation

Metro-North Promises More New Haven Line Trains, a Credit Program, and an Investigation

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

Following a power outage that has curtailed service on the nation's most heavily traveled commuter rail line, New York's MTA says it will reimburse ticket holders.

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Transportation Nation

Explainer: Your Metro-North Commute Survival Guide

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Even though the New Haven Line now has some "bare bones electrical power," Monday's commute will only have half the capacity of a normal one -- and passengers should prepare for crowded conditions. Here's what you need to know.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: Metro North New Haven Line Commuters

Friday, September 27, 2013

If you're one of the 125,000 people who rely on the Metro North New Haven line, do you have a good workaround to getting to the city now that a power failure has snarled your commute? And is this SNAFU changing your mind about living in the suburbs in the first place? Or is it changing the way you think about whether you actually need to be physically at work at all? Call us: 212-433-9692.

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Transportation Nation

Power Outage Hobbles Metro-North's New Haven Line; Repair Could Take Weeks

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

It could take weeks to restore the broken power equipment on the nation's busiest commuter rail line.

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Transportation Nation

Connecticut's Aging Rail Technology Is Causing Breakdowns From Both Heat and Cold

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

New Haven Line train.

(New York, NY - WNYC) Performance on a major New York commuter rail line during last week's heat wave was a tale of the two states it serves. Outdated technology in Connecticut led to multiple train breakdowns and stranded passengers on the New Haven Line, which connects that state to Grand Central Terminal in Midtown Manhattan. One train stalled between stations when overhead power lines sagged and tangled, leaving passengers sweltering and stuck for almost an hour.

All the while, trains on New York tracks ran smoothly.

The NY Metropolitan Transportation Authority says that's because New York State invested early last decade in a new overhead power system that automatically takes up the slack when wires start drooping in the heat. New York also bought new train cars that held up fairly well during the Northeast's bitter and blizzardy winter of 2010-2011.

MTA spokeswoman Marjorie Anders said Connecticut did neither, and paid for it during both seasons.

The authority was forced to curtail service on the New Haven line by 10 percent in January when the old trains broke down faster than Connecticut's cramped work yards could repair them. But Metro-North's Harlem Line, which runs newer trains purchased by New York in 2000, didn't have those problems.

Similarly, New York invested in overhauling its overhead power system for trains in the last decade. Towers that hold up the wires now have counterweights that lower and tighten the wires when they sag. Connecticut has no such system. Last week, the NY MTA tried to prevent the overhead lines from tangling by ordering trains on its lines to slow from a normal cruising speed of 70 m.p.h. to 50 m.p.h. It worked in New York but not Connecticut.

Ms. Anders said the overhead wires provide electrical current by making contact with a four-foot wide metal bar on the top of a train. Last Friday's high temperature of 104 degrees caused the overhead wires in Connecticut to sag so much that they slipped off the side of the metal bar on some trains and tangled, cutting off power and halting those trains.

"It goes without saying that antique fleet and an antique infrastructure and power system is not going to perform well in any temperature or weather extremes, whether it's snow or heat," she said.

Connecticut has been trying to catch up. Governor Dannel Malloy agreed to spend $400 million dollars on new overhead wires and $750 million dollars on new train cars better suited to the cold weather. The new cars have started arriving but the new overhead power system won't be done until 2016.

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Transportation Nation

Metro-North's New Haven Line To Restore Full Service on Monday

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

New rail cars debuted today on Metro-North's New Haven line (photo by Jim O'Grady)

(New York, NY -Jim O'Grady, WNYC) Riders on Metro North Railroad's New Haven Line will get their regular service back sooner than expected on Monday.

The NYC MTA abruptly cut the line's schedule by 10 percent in early February after winter storms disabled its old cars faster than repairs could be made. Most of those cuts were made to rush hour trains on the already crowded commuter line from Manhattan to Connecticut. For years, the line has routinely run trains with fewer cars than platforms can handle, leading to standing-room-only crushes during peak times.

The MTA has said the service problems can be traced to a funding gap caused by Connecticut's refusal to pay for new trains for years, beginning in 2000.  (A fuller explanation of the funding problem is here.)

A return to full service wasn't expected until spring, with the arrival of new train cars.

But this morning, Metro-North President Howard Permut said the MTA activated eight new cars that--along with more repairs--will allow the railroad to run more trains.

"Next week, the trains will be crowded," he said. "But they will not be nearly as crowded as they were during January, when they were jammed."

Permut talked to reporters at Grand Central Station this morning, having ridden on the maiden trip of the new train cars from Stamford, Connecticut.

The interior of the new Metro-North rail car (Jim O'Grady)

The new cars arrive two years late. They are the first of 380 cars that will be put into service over the next two years, at a cost of $761 million. Jim Cameron of the Connecticut Metro North Rail Commuter Council also rode the new train into Grand Central this morning. Normally a critic of the railroad, he had nothing but praise for the long-awaited Kawasaki cars.
"The ride was smooth," he said. "The heat worked, the lighting was great, the seats were comfortable. The bathroom was fabulous. It didn't stink--and it was the size of a studio apartment in Manhattan."
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