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Nevada

The Takeaway

Meet the Delegates: Ron Paul Supporters

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Two hundred and eighty-six delegates have traveled to Tampa, Florida for the Republican National Convention, and last night those delegates chose the next Republican nominee for president. The Takeaway set out to meet some of these delegates and hear their stories.

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The Takeaway

Las Vegas: the "Single Dad" City

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Sin City has a new claim to fame, with the highest per capita rate of single fathers than any other city in America. Franz Strasser, a reporter for our partner the BBC, spoke to some of those single dads in Las Vegas.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: GOP Should Worry About the Moguls Endorsing Their Candidates

Friday, February 03, 2012

You’d think that Republican voters would be concerned about Gingrich’s connections to the sinful Las Vegas gambling industry. Or Mitt Romney's endorsement from the guy who's catch phrase is "You're Fired!" But they sure don't seem to be.

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Transportation Nation

Obama Heads West To Stump for Jobs Programs

Monday, October 24, 2011

Obama stumping for jobs act in Millers Creek, NC

President Obama continues to barnstorm the country for the American Jobs Act.  He'll stop in Nevada today -- Harry Reid's home state -- and Denver on Wednesday to push portions of the American Jobs Act, which includes $60 billion infrastructure proposal -- $50 billion in straight-up spending, and another $10 billion for an infrastructure bank.

Most of the $50 billion in spending is targeted for repair work, which can get money out the door much more quickly than the new "shovel ready" projects in his earlier stimulus.

But handicappers give the bill almost no chance of passing.  So you can read the President's trip to key swing states -- Nevada and Colorado, both of which he won in 2008, and both of which held on to Democratic Senate seats in 2010 while states all around were going red -- for what it is: a chance to shore up support where support will be needed in 2012.

Here's an excerpt of the President's Remarks at the Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada:

And three years later, it's clear that a big chunk of Washington has not gotten the message yet.  Just look at what's been going on since I introduced my jobs bill in September.  Now, this is a bill that is filled with proposals that, traditionally, Democrats and Republicans have supported in the past:  tax cuts for workers and small businesses; funding to rebuild our roads and our bridges and our airports, our infrastructure, our transportation system; putting construction workers back on the job; hiring back teachers and cops, firefighters; giving incentives so that veterans are able to find work when they come home -- because, I promise you, if you've laid down your life or risked your life for this country, you should not have to fight for a job when you come home.  (Applause.)

 

So those are the proposals contained in this bill.  It's a bill that's fully paid for -- by asking those of us who make more than $1 million to pay a little more in taxes.  Independent economists, people who look at this stuff for a living, say that it's the only plan out there right now that would create jobs in the short term as well as lay a foundation for economic growth in the long term.  One economist said it would create nearly 2 million jobs next year -- 2 million.  And by the way, that economist did not work for me.  And polls show that an overwhelming majority of Americans support the proposals that are in this bill -- Democrats, independents and Republicans.

 

So we've got huge challenges in places like Nevada.  We've got a jobs bill out there that is paid for and addresses those challenges.  The question is, why, despite all the support -- despite all the experts who say this jobs bill couldn't come at a more important time, when so many people are hurting -- why the Republicans in Washington have said no?  They keep voting against it.  Now, maybe it's just because I am the one sponsoring it.  I don't know.  But last week, we had a separate vote on a part of the jobs bill that would put 400,000 teachers, firefighters and police officers back on the job, paid for by asking people who make more than $1 million to pay one-half of 1 percent in additional taxes.  For somebody making $1.1 million a year, that's an extra $500.  Five hundred bucks.  And with that, we could have saved $400,000 jobs.

 

Most people making more than $1 million, if you talk to them, they'll say, I'm willing to pay $500 extra to help the country.  They’re patriots.  They believe we’re all in this thing together.  But all the Republicans in the Senate said no.  Their leader, Mitch McConnell, said that -- and I’m going to make sure I quote this properly -- saving the jobs of teachers and cops and firefighters was just -- I quote -- “a bailout.”  A bailout.  These aren’t bad actors who somehow screwed up the economy.  They didn’t act irresponsibly.  These are the men and women who teach our children, who patrol our streets, who run into burning buildings and save people.  They deserve our support.

 

This is the fight that we’re going to have right now, and I suspect this is the fight that we’re going to have to have over the next year.  The Republicans in Congress and the Republican candidates for President have made their agenda very clear.  They have two basic economic principles:  first, tax cuts for the very wealthiest and the biggest corporations, paid for by gutting investments in education and research and infrastructure and programs like Medicare.  That’s agenda item number one.  Second is just about every regulation that's out there they want to get rid of -- clean air, clean water -- you name it.

 

Now, I agree that there are some rules and regulations that put an unnecessary burden on business at a time when we can’t afford it.  I mean, we’ve seen this in our travel bureau, where the bureaucracy for getting a visa to come visit Vegas is too long.  We want to get them here quicker; they can stay longer and spend more.  And that’s why, in addition to what we’re doing with the travel bureau, we’ve already identified 500 regulatory reforms that will save billions of dollars over the next few years -- billions of dollars over the next few years.  But unfortunately, so far at least, we have not gotten any willingness on the other side to say that some regulations we can’t give up.

 

We are not going to win the race in this competitive 21st century economy by having the cheapest labor or the most polluted air.  That’s a race to the bottom that we can’t win.  There’s always going to be a country out there that can exploit its workers more, or pollute its air more, or pollute its water more, have lower worker safety standards.  There’s always going to be somebody out there to win that competition.  The competition we need to win is because we have the best scientists, and we’ve got the best universities, and we’ve got the best workers, and we have the best infrastructure, and we’ve got the best resorts, and we’ve got the best ideas, and we’ve got the best system, and it’s the most transparent and it’s the most accountable.  That’s how we’re going to win the competition for the future.  And that’s what’s at stake right now in this race.

 

 

 

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The Takeaway

Obama and GOP Hopefuls Set Their Sights on Swing States

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

The 2012 Election is more than a year away, but the president and Republican presidential hopefuls are already campaigning, and setting their sights on potential swing states. Tuesday night, the Republican presidential candidates will debate once again, this time in the swing state of Nevada. Meanwhile, President Obama is traveling through the swing state of North Carolina, hoping to rally support for his jobs bill.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Wall Street Protests, Jobs Bill, Ben Bernanke

Monday, October 03, 2011

The New York police department arrested over 700 Occupy Wall Street protesters Saturday, for allegedly walking across the Brooklyn Bridge's roadway, instead of using the pedestrian path. Now in its third week, the movement has spread to other cities around the nation. Meanwhile, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke is scheduled to testify before Congress tomorrow on the economic outlook for the country, and unemployment figures are set to be released Friday, as President Obama continues to push his jobs bill. And Nevada has moved its caucus date back, ahead of Florida's, which will likely affect the race for the Republican nomination.

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The Takeaway

Democrats May Lose New York, Nevada House Seats Today

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Two special elections for Congressional seats scheduled for today could end in losses for Democrats. In New York City, Rep. Anthony Weiner's old seat is up for grabs. Republican Bob Turner, a 70 year old businessman without any government experience, is facing off against State Assemblyman David Weprin. If Turner is elected, he will be the first Republican to represent this part of Queens in the House since 1920. Acorss the country in Nevada, Republican Mark Amodei is comfortable leading Democrat Kate Marshall in the Second Congressional District.

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The Takeaway

Nevada May Sue BofA; Executive Pay Exceeds Taxes Paid at Top Corporations

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Our partner, The New York Times, reported yesterday that Nevada's attorney general is asking a federal judge to throw out a settlement made between the state and Bank of America, claiming the bank violated the broad loan modification agreement it made with Nevada in 2008. If the judge throws the settlement out, Nevada would likely sue Bank of America.

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The Takeaway

Verdict is in on Tea Party: Between a Trickle and a Wave

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

For Tea Partiers, last night's race was a mixed bag. Tea Party candidates did well in states that were already red, like Kentucky, and South Carolina, but failed to make gains in bluer states like Delaware. In Nevada, Sharron Angle, one of the most notorious Tea Party Republicans, lost to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, the state's wildly unpopular Democratic Senator.

 

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The Takeaway

Nevada Ad Tells Latinos 'Don't Vote'

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Spanish language television network Univision is refusing to air a new political ad in Nevada for its controversial message to Latinos: "Don't vote." Univision says the ad is antithetical to its mission to promote civic engagement in the Latino community.

The spot was produced by a group called Latinos for Reform, which says that Democrats take Latino votes for granted and didn't use their majorities in Congress to address immigration reform. Critics, however, complain that Latinos for Reform's president, Robert de Posada, has long ties to the Republican party and is looking to hurt re-election chances for Nevada Sen. Harry Reid.

Read the full transcript of the interview here.

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The Takeaway

Reid-Angle Faceoff Intensifies in Nevada

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Our partners at the BBC traveled to Searchlight, Nevada to speak with voters about the upcoming election for the U.S. Senate. Incumbent Senator Harry Reid is facing off against Tea Party-backed Sharon Angle. As in some other races across the country, Democrats are facing an uphill battle, trying to distance their candidate from Washington and the Obama agenda.

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The Takeaway

What's In a Name, Nevada?

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

From George W. Bush to Michelle Obama, political candidates have learned the hard way that if you want to get votes in Nevada, you need to know how to pronounce it like a local. But that isn't as clear-cut as it sounds. The linguistics are so disputed that outgoing Assemblyman Harry Mortenson is now working on a resolution that would make “neh-VAH-dah” an equally acceptable pronunciation as "neh-VA-dah." It is a political plea for tolerance.

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Transportation Nation

Senate Energy Reform Gets Even Smaller

Thursday, July 22, 2010

(Todd Zwillich, Transportation Nation) The slimmed-down energy bill we've been forecasting for the Senate floor next week will be even slimmer than expected.

The Hill newspaper is quoting Senate Democratic aides who say that the energy bill will leave off any attempt set a price for carbon. Instead, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) will go with an even narrower package, regulating BP and other oil drillers as well as promoting green energy production and fuel-efficient vehicles.

Supporters of a cap-and-trade approach to regulating greenhouse gases had floated the idea of applying the scheme to utilities alone in recent weeks. That approach might have been politically more palatable to a Senate that is wary of slowing down the economy with new energy mandates. Now it seems even the less ambitious carbon policy is off the table until next year.

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Transportation Nation

Transportation Spending is Target of Waste Watchdogs

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

(Washington, DC - Todd Zwillich, Transportation Nation)  The enemies of pork barrel spending are taking aim at the latest transportation funding bill. That’s despite the fact that earmarks in the bill are lower than ever.

Spending watchdog Citizens Against Government Waste says the Fiscal 2011 appropriations bill for the departments of Transportation and Housing and Urban Development is carrying 459 pet projects as it makes its way to the House floor later this summer.

Those earmarks, including $500,000 for a solar-powered Berkeley, Calif., ferry service championed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi,

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Transportation Nation

Senators to White House with Energy Agenda Unclear

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

(Washington, DC - Todd Zwillich, Transportation Nation)  Nearly a quarter of the United States Senate is expected at the White House this morning to meet with President Obama on energy and climate legislation, though the form that legislation will take--and whether it will have the votes to pass--is very much in doubt.

Twenty-three senators from both parties, as well as Independents, are due to meet with Obama shortly before 11 AM. While broad energy legislation is the main topic, the fate of global warming legislation in the form of carbon regulation hangs in the balance. That balance may include no direct attempts to control carbon emissions in the transportation sector.

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Transportation Nation

Senate May Drop Key Tax Credit For Biodiesel Industry

Thursday, June 24, 2010

(Washington, DC - Todd Zwillich, Transportation Nation)  The nation's truckers aren’t likely to start pumping biodiesel any time soon, by the looks of the United States Senate.  That’s because the resurrection of a big biodiesel tax credit is poised to fall victim to a larger tax and jobs bill, which failed tonight on the Senate floor.

The credit is worth $868 million over ten years to refiners who blend biofuel from soybeans, animal fats, restaurant waste oil and other sources into traditional, petroleum-based diesel.  Refiners get a one-dollar tax credit for every gallon they blend, and the savings generally go to making biodiesel more competitive with standard diesel at the pump.

Congress has extended the credit for the last few years, and it still enjoys strong support from both parties. But partisan disagreement over a broader package of tax provisions and unemployment benefits ended the credit.  At least for the time being.

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The Takeaway

Of Labor and Incumbency: Primaries in Arkansas, Nevada

Tuesday, June 08, 2010

Primary races are scheduled in eleven states today. We are looking at two elections with national implications: Arkansas, where the power of organized labor is at play, and Nevada, where Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is hoping a specific GOP pick will enable him to keep his seat. 

In Arkansas, Democratic Senator Blanche Lincoln is facing a run-off against Lt. Gov. Bill Halter. Organized labor groups, both local and national, have thrown their weight behind Halter, saying Lincoln betrayed them by not supporting a public option in health care reform and by voting for NAFTA as a U.S. Representative, in 1993. National labor groups have pumped millions of dollars into the race - leading some analysts to suggest that Arkansas' primary contest has been hijacked by national interests.

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The Takeaway

Measuring the 'Aftershock' in Nevada

Tuesday, September 08, 2009

The BBC documentary "Aftershock" takes a close up look at how Americans are getting on one year after the economic collapse. To record “Aftershock,” our partners at the BBC World Service asked Steve Evans, the host of BBC show “Business Daily” to go to Nevada and chronicle the lives of those impacted. Steve Evans joins us to talk about the documentary.

Watch a promo video of "Aftershock":

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Studio 360

Fwd This

Friday, April 28, 2006

In the latest installment of our series on forwarded emails, Kurt Andersen gushes over a nine second video in which 500 kilovolts of electricity light up the Nevada sky.

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