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Neuroscience

Radiolab

Ears don't lie

Friday, December 28, 2012

Radiolab's latest smart-crush: Molly Webster runs into a neuroscientist who elaborates on our unappreciated sense of hearing and she has to tell somebody about it...

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The Takeaway

The Future of the Brain

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Ray Kurzweil, technologist and futurist who is on a mission to make us all immortal. According to Kurzweil, technology is progressing at a faster and faster rate so that in 10 or 15 years cancer may not exist and aging may be reversible.  His newest book is called “How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed.”

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The Takeaway

The Reading Brain

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Our brains evolved in survivalist terms, prioritizing basic sensory functions, like sight and scent. Today, our brains must adapt to learn much more complex processes, like learning to read, as Maryanne Wolfe, the Director of the Center for Reading and Language Research at Tufts University, explains. 

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The Takeaway

Understanding 'How the Mind Makes Meaning'

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

What happens in our brains when we hear language, or speak it? In addition to our brains, what other parts of our bodies are at work, trying to relay and understand meaning? And how does all of this inform the way we interact with phones, computers, and non-human language systems? These are all questions that cognitive science professor Benjamin Bergen contemplates in his work at the University of California – San Diego, and in his new book, "Louder than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning."

 

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaway | December 26, 2012

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Understanding How the Mind Makes Meaning | The Reading Brain | Your Brain on Sound | The Real Science of Erasing Your Brain | The Future of the Brain

The Brian Lehrer Show

Protecting Kids from Concussions

Monday, December 24, 2012

Dr. Robert Cantu, chief of neurosurgery and director of the Service of Sports Medicine at Emerson Hospital in Concord, MA and the co-author of Concussions and Our Kids: America's Leading Expert on How to Protect Young Athletes and Keep Sports Safe ,discusses efforts being made to protect children from sports-related head injuries. 

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Radiolab

Leaving Your Lamarck

Monday, November 19, 2012

Jad starts us off with some wishful parental thinking: that no matter how many billions of lines of genetic code, or how many millions of years of evolution came before you, your struggles, your efforts, matter -- not just in a touchy feely kind of way, but in ways that ...

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Soundcheck

Music Lessons Impact The Brain Into Adulthood

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

A recent study shows that even limited childhood musical training can improve brain functions in adulthood. 

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Radiolab

Why we fall into a good book

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Writer Jonathan Gottschall explores why the real world falls away when we hear a good story... 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Neuroscience of Success and Failure

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Neuroscientist and clinical psychologist Ian Robertson looks at why some people succeed in life and in business while others fail, and why some individuals become powerful while most others remain powerless. In The Winner Effect: The Neuroscience of Success and Failure, he shows how success changes the chemistry of the brain, making you more focused, smarter, more confident, and more aggressive. It also answers the question of why some people attain and then handle success better than others.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Protecting Kids from Concussions

Monday, October 15, 2012

Dr. Robert Cantu, chief of neurosurgery and director of the Service of Sports Medicine at Emerson Hospital in Concord, MA and the co-author of Concussions and Our Kids: America's Leading Expert on How to Protect Young Athletes and Keep Sports Safe.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Neuroscience of Love

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Larry Young, professor of psychiatry at Emory University, director of its Center for Translational Social Neuroscience, and science journalist Brian Alexander, discuss their search for a "grand unified theory" of love from their book The Chemistry Between Us: Love, Sex, and the Science of Attraction.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Hearing and the Mind

Monday, September 17, 2012

Seth Horowitz, neuroscientist and professor at Brown University and the author of The Universal Sense: How Hearing Shapes the Mind, talks about how sound affects us and how we've learned to manipulate it.

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Radiolab

How to Grow Your Brain

Wednesday, September 05, 2012

Lulu Miller wonders if there's any truth to Mr. Rogers' claims about the "Garden of the Mind."

 

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The Takeaway

What Does Your Sneeze Say About You?

Monday, August 20, 2012

Until recently, we thought of laughing, sneezing and hiccuping as ordinary human actions. But it turns out that these seemingly-mundane behaviors have a long evolutionary history. In fact, how we cough, laugh and hiccup says a lot about our psychology, and that of our ancestors.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Optimism Brain Training

Friday, June 22, 2012

Can optimism be taught? Elaine Fox, fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, director of the Affective Neuroscience Laboratory in the Department of Psychology at the University of Essex, and author of Rainy Brain, Sunny Brain: How to Retrain Your Brain to Overcome Pessimism and Achieve a More Positive Outlook, says neuroscience shows that it can, and why it matters.

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Radiolab

When Brains Attack!

Friday, June 22, 2012

Strange stories of brains leading their owners astray, knocking them off balance, and, sometimes, propelling them to do amazing things.

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Radiolab

Basal ganglia gone wild

Friday, June 22, 2012

The basal ganglia is a core part of the brain, deep inside your skull, that helps control movement. Unless something upsets the chain of command.

Enter Liza Shoenfeld. After graduating from college in 2009,  Liza got a job as a research associate in a lab at the University ...

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On Being

Richard Davidson — Investigating Healthy Minds [remix]

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Once upon a time we assumed the brain stops developing when we're young. Neuroscientist Richard Davidson helped overturn this idea by studying the brains of meditating Buddhist monks. Now he's working on conditions like ADHD and autism.

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On Being

[Unedited] Richard Davidson with Krista Tippett

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Once upon a time we assumed the brain stops developing when we're young. Neuroscientist Richard Davidson helped overturn this idea by studying the brains of meditating Buddhist monks. Now he's working on conditions like ADHD and autism.

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