Streams

Neuroscience

The Takeaway

Is Morgan Freeman Lying To You About Your Brain?

Friday, July 25, 2014

The new movie “Lucy” is based on the oft-cited statistic that we only use 10 percent of our brains. But is 90 percent of your brain really just untapped potential?

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The Takeaway

Turning to Brain Scans to Find Consciousness

Monday, April 21, 2014

Thanks to improved trauma care, more people are surviving brain injuries. But many patients end up in vegetative or minimally conscious states. A look at the tools and technology that better identifies hidden consciousness.

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The Takeaway

The Biology of Intimacy & Making Love Last

Friday, February 14, 2014

How do we make love last? Helen Fisher, biological anthropologist and professor at the Center for Human Evolution Studies at Rutgers, explains her recent research on the scientific underpinnings of long-lasting romance. The Takeaway also gets relationship advice from one couple, Jack Connelly and Bob Gaither, who began dating 37 years ago, in the late 1970s. At that time, they truly defied the odds as a gay couple and an interracial couple. They share their story, along with the relationship lessons they've learned over the past few decades together.

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Radiolab

Who's Got A Pregnant Brain?

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Something happened to dolphins. Then it happened to humans. Both creatures had good-sized brains when, for reasons no one truly understands, dolphin brains suddenly got larger and larger, until — 15 million years ago — they stopped growing. Two million years ago it was our turn. Our brains went from the size of an orange to the size of a cantaloupe. Why the start? Why the stop? Who's next?

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On Being

Joan Halifax — Compassion's Edge States and Caring Better [remix]

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Joan Halifax — Compassion's Edge States and Caring Better

It's easy to feel overwhelmed by all the bad news and horrific pictures in the world. This is a form of empathy, Joan Halifax says, that works against us. The Zen abbot and medical anthropologist has bracing, nourishing thoughts on finding buoyancy rather than burnout in how we work, live, and care.

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On Being

[Unedited] Joan Halifax with Krista Tippett

Thursday, December 26, 2013

[Unedited] Joan Halifax with Krista TippettIn this unedited interview, Roshi Joan Halifax and Krista Tippett talk in front of a live audience at the Chautauqua Institution. It's easy to feel overwhelmed by all the bad news and horrific pictures in the world. This is a form of empathy, Joan Halifax says, that works against us. The Zen abbot and medical anthropologist has bracing, nourishing thoughts on finding buoyancy rather than burnout in how we work, live, and care.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Neuroscientist Joshua Greene argues that our brains were designed for tribal life, for getting along with a select group of others (Us) and for fighting off everyone else (Them). But modern times have forced the world’s tribes into a shared space, resulting in epic clashes. Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them combines neuroscience, psychology, and philosophy to reveal the underlying causes of modern conflict. Dr. Greene is an award-winning teacher and scientist, and he directs Harvard University’s Moral Cognition Lab, which uses neuroscience and cognitive techniques to understand how people really make moral decisions.

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Radiolab

John McCluskey’s Brain

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

In our Blame episode, we asked whether the condition of a criminal’s brain should lessen the punishment for his crime. Now there’s a headline-making story about this very question.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Development Deals; Hannukah in the U.S.; Lying

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Development projects are making their way through the approval pipeline in the final weeks of Mayor Bloomberg’s last term before Bill de Blasio takes office. Charles Bagli of The New York Times talks about the process and why developers are trying to get deals firmed up before the change in City Hall. Plus: your calls on the nature of Hannukah in the United States and how you celebrate the holiday; neuroscientist Sam Harris on his new essay on lying and the harmful deception in our society; and calls from shop owners promoting themselves to other listeners ahead of this weekend’s “Small Business Saturday.”

The Leonard Lopate Show

Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them

Thursday, November 07, 2013

Neuroscientist Joshua Greene argues that our brains were designed for tribal life, for getting along with a select group of others (Us) and for fighting off everyone else (Them). But modern times have forced the world’s tribes into a shared space, resulting in epic clashes. Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them combines neuroscience, psychology, and philosophy to reveal the underlying causes of modern conflict. Dr. Greene is an award-winning teacher and scientist, and he directs Harvard University’s Moral Cognition Lab, which uses neuroscience and cognitive techniques to understand how people really make moral decisions.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Neuroscience and Morality; Ann Patchett; "Sidewalk Stories"

Thursday, November 07, 2013

Neuroscientist Joshua Green explains how our brains evolved after tribal life to deal with the conditions of our modern societies. Novelist Ann Patchett explores the commitments she’s made in her life in her new memoir, This is the Story of a Happy Marriage. Charles Lane on “Sidewalk Stories,” his black and white silent comedy that he filmed on the streets of Manhattan in the 1980s. And we’ll find out whether the American military knew about the trove of Nazi-stolen art that’s been in the headlines since the 1950s, decades before German authorities found it.

Radiolab

Fault Line

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Kevin* is a likable guy who lives with his wife in New Jersey. And he's on probation after serving time in a federal prison for committing a disturbing crime. Producer Pat Walters helps untangle a difficult story about accountability, and a troubling set of questions about identity and self-control. Kevin's ...

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Radiolab

Forget about Blame?

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Nita Farahany, who's been following the growing field of Neurolaw for years now, helps uncover what seems to be a growing trend -- defendants using brain science to argue that they aren't entirely at fault. Neuroscientist David Eagleman thinks this is completely wrongheaded, and argues for ...

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Mayoral Campaign Ads; Egypt Latest; Left-Brain/Right-Brain

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

With the primary three weeks away, voters are seeing more and more campaign ads and flyers from the mayoral contenders. We take your calls on how the candidates' messages are impacting your decision. Plus: Time's Bobby Ghosh on Egypt; City Council Member Brad Lander on unequal treatment of affordable housing tenants in luxury buildings; a new study debunks the idea of left-brain and right-brain behavior; and the words and phrases that the Chinese government blocks on the social media site Weibo.

→ Reminder: Reddit AMA with Errol Louis at 2pm Today! Will be live at this link a little before 2.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Network Politics; Albany Surprises; Short Science

Monday, August 19, 2013

The RNC has voted to ban two networks from the 2016 primary debates. Ben Smith of Buzzfeed explains the dustup over two planned projects about Hillary Clinton. Plus: Bill Mahoney of NYPIRG talks about the surprises that were in bills Albany lawmakers passed this session. Then, a quick round-up of recent scientific developments including a new study showing there’s no such thing as right-brain and left-brain behavior, and a debate among physicists about what happens to you if you’re in a black hole.

→ Programming Note: Join Brian and NY1s Errol Louis for a Reddit "AMA" Tuesday at 2pm. Check this page for link Tuesday.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Oliver Sacks on Hallucinations

Monday, July 08, 2013

Neurologist Oliver Sacks talks about hallucinations and what they tell us about how the brain works. His book, Hallucinations, weaves together stories of his patients and of his own hallucinatory experiences and explores how hallucinations have influenced every culture’s folklore and art, and why the potential for hallucination is present in us all, a vital part of the human condition.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Mindless Neuroscience

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

As it turns out, brain scans might not necessarily be the best way to understand psychology.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Stop and Frisk Stats; Africa Policy; TWA 800; Bad Neuroscience

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Mayor Bloomberg said that the NYPD "disproportionately stops whites too much and minorities too little." We'll take a look at the statistics and why that comment is drawing criticism. Plus: President Obama's Africa policy and U.S. investment there; revisiting the 1996 TWA 800 flight crash with journalist and filmmaker Kristina Borjesson; and Sally Satel and Scott O. Lilienfeld discuss their new book Brainwashed: The Seductive Appeal of Mindless Neuroscience.

Radiolab

Inner Voices

Thursday, June 27, 2013

How the voices in our heads shape us, for better and for worse.

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Radiolab

A Head Full of Symphonies

Thursday, June 27, 2013

A neurologist issues a wild musical dare to a conductor and a ragtime piano player. One gives up almost instantly. But the other pulls off something that shouldn't be possible.

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