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Net Neutrality

The Brian Lehrer Show

Compromise on Net Neutrality

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Tim Wu, a policy advocate and professor at Columbia Law School, discusses yesterday's FCC compromise vote on net neutrality. His recent book The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires examines how new media revolutions are always proceeded by centralized corporate control over the new mediums.

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The Takeaway

Users Watch FCC's Moves on Net Neutrality

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Today the Federal Communications Commission will announce new rules for how service providers filter the spectrum of websites to their consumers. The issue of net neutrality has drawn passionate debate from all sides, including consumers who want equal access to all corners of the Internet, and companies that want to drive those consumers to their own services first. Brian Stelter, reporter for the Media Decoder blog at our partner The New York Times, weighs in on the FCC's new net neutrality regulations, and what they might mean for the future of the Internet.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell,' Repeal, START Agreement, Net Neutrality

Monday, December 20, 2010

The Senate voted to repeal "don't ask, don't tell," over the weekend. The law, enacted 17 years ago by President Bill Clinton, allowed gays to serve in the military, as long as they did not reveal their sexual orientation. Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, looks at what's next for the repeal. Meanwhile, a number of economic indicators come out this week, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC, looks at the upcoming third quarter GDP numbers due out Wednesday, along with existing home sales numbers, and new home sales numbers on Thursday.

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It's A Free Country ®

Election Results Are In: How Will They Affect Net Neutrality, Freelancers and Space?

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

WNYC
So you end up with this really difficult political moment where defending network neutrality, which should be sort of common sense in many areas, is that much harder because people have this sort of allergic reaction to the idea of government intervention, even if that intervention is to maintain a free market.

- Siva Vaidhyanathan, associate professor of media studies and law at the University of Virginia on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Election Fall-Out: Net Neutrality, Freelancers, Space

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

We shine the spotlight on a few smaller issues that were affected significantly by the results of last Tuesday's election. Siva Vaidhyanathan, associate professor of media studies and law at the University of Virginia, talks about the midterm elections, and what they will mean for net neutrality; also, Sara Horowitz, executive director of Working Today Freelancer's Union, talks about the midterm elections, and what they will mean for freelancers; then, Tariq Malik, Managing Editor for SPACE.com, talks about the midterm elections, and what they will mean for NASA and the American Space program.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Net Neutrality Threatened?

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Siva Vaidhyanathan, associate professor of media studies and law at the University of Virginia and msnbc.com contributor, talks about the relationship between Google and Verizon and possible threats to net neutrality.

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The Takeaway

Google and Verizon Discuss 'Net Neutrality'

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Earlier this week, The New York Times discovered that Google and Verizon were working on a backdoor deal which, as many online activists worried, would threaten the future of “net neutrality.” In essence, “net neutrality” means that the Internet carries traffic as quickly as it can, regardless of the source. If this neutrality were to end, particular websites could pay ISPs to carry their traffic faster than their competitors.

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The Takeaway

Internet Giants Allegedly Fighting Net Neutrality

Monday, August 09, 2010

In theory, the Internet provides a level playing field for businesses and consumers alike. That’s because, since its creation, the Internet has been built around the principle of “net neutrality”: all traffic online travels as quickly as it can, given the technology and congestion it encounters along the way.  According to an article published by our partner The New York Times, however, a backdoor deal may be nearing between Google and Verizon, which could give a speed advantage to those websites who are willing to pay more.

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The Takeaway

Judge Says FCC Can't Enforce 'Net Neutrality'

Wednesday, April 07, 2010

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled Tuesday that the FCC has no regulating authority over how Comcast or any other internet provider manages its network. 

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