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Box Turtle Goes Missing From Inwood Park

Monday, December 05, 2011

In March, Bronx Zoo officials scrambled to locate a cobra who had escaped from its cage. In August, Central Park Zoo officials breathed a sigh of relief when a peacock who had wandered out of the zoo flew back home. Now, urban park rangers are on the lookout for a missing Eastern Box Turtle named Lionel who disappeared from Inwood Hill Nature Center last Thursday.

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The Takeaway

Earthquake Rattles East Coast, As Hurricane Heads for U.S.

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

A very rare event happened In the northeastern part of the United States yesterday. A 5.8 magnitude earthquake centered in Mineral, Virginia sent tremors outward, all the way north to New York and New England, and south to North Carolina. Limited damage was reported and some even found the event to be exciting. The earthquake follows a number of natural disasters we have witnessed this year, including Japan's massive quake and tsunami, tornadoes ravaging southern states and the Mississippi River rising to historic levels, flooding cities in its path. And now Hurricane Irene, which experts predict could turn into a category 4 storm, and may hit Florida on Friday.

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The Takeaway

Texas Wildfires Continue to Ravage Lone Star State

Thursday, April 21, 2011

More than 1.5 million acres have burned in what officials are calling the worst wildfires that Texas has ever seen. The Texas Fire Service reported yesterday that there had been some progress in fighting The Wildcat Fire, north of San Angelo, The Cooper Mountain Ranch Fire, east of Lubbock and the The Rockhouse fire, south east of El Paso. Some strides were also made at Possum Kingdom Lake, west of Ft. Worth. But two fire fighters have died in the fight to control the blazes, and federal teams have been called into help.

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The Takeaway

Philip Connors on 'Fire Season'

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

Every day between April and August, Philip Connors climbs a 55-foot tower and settles into a 7-by-7 foot enclosed platform for the next eight hours. The tower is in the Gila National Forest of New Mexico, and his duty while there, is to look out for fires. But while Gila receives more than thirty thousand lightening strikes per year, Connors’s job is actually closer to Walden Pond than reality TV. Alone with nature, and his thoughts, he enjoys solitude, freedom and independence — independence which surely helped him complete a new book called “Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout.

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The Takeaway

Bats May Be Wiped Out by White-Nose Syndrome

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

A fungus dubbed white-nose syndrome, first discovered in bat colonies in 2006, is threatening to wipe out nine species of bats across the country. Since first discovered, scientists estimate that over a million bats have died of the disease. If the animals disappear, their main food source, insects, may balloon to troubling proportions, destroying crops and spreading disease. To tell us more on this story of bats' struggle for survival is Ed Jahn of Oregon Public Broadcasting. 

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Micropolis

Pale Male's Lady Hawk Has Gone Missing

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

The fuss over Pale Male may have seemed more like a stealth Upper East Side real estate story than about urban wildlife, but now Lola, the red tailed hawk's famous mate with whom he shared a nest at 927 Fifth Ave., has gone missing and may be dead.

From Bruce Yolton at the Urban Hawks blog: "Lola hasn't been seen since mid-December and is unfortunately presumed dead."

But Bruce posted this really nice video, so you can get a sense of how a hawk snacks on squirrel (scroll to 1:44). Seriously, at times it's quite beautiful but can be graphic.

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The Takeaway

Visit Beautiful... Iraq?

Thursday, September 23, 2010

The images we often associate with Iraq are of destruction, war and dysfunction. But one man hopes to show people another side of the country, with a lovely tour down a Kurdistan river.  

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Features

Perseid Meteor Shower Lights Up New York Sky

Friday, August 13, 2010

The sky will be at its peak falling potential on Friday night as the Perseid meteor shower flashes above. The best news? You might not even have to leave New York City to catch a glimpse.

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On Being

Bill McKibben — The Moral Math of Climate Change [remix]

Thursday, August 05, 2010

A conversation about climate change and moral imagination with a leading environmentalist and writer who has been ahead of the curve on this issue since he wrote The End of Nature in 1989. We explore his evolving perspective on human responsib

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On Being

[Unedited] Bill McKibben with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 05, 2010

A conversation about climate change and moral imagination with a leading environmentalist and writer who has been ahead of the curve on this issue since he wrote The End of Nature in 1989. We explore his evolving perspective on human responsib

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WQXR Blog

Souvenir de Chamonix

Monday, July 19, 2010

The cliché September school essay, “What I Did on My Summer Vacation” will be no problem for me this year. Earlier this month, I fulfilled a dream of hiking in the Alps.

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The Takeaway

How to Clean an Oiled Duck

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Day 36, and oil is still gushing into the Gulf of Mexico. Volunteers from all over the country are heading to the shores of Louisiana and Mississippi to help in any way they can. A lot of these volunteers are training to save and clean animals that have been affected by the oil, particularly birds, whose oil-soaked feathers prevent them from flying and keeping warm. 

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WQXR News

The Bald Eagle is Back in New York

Thursday, March 04, 2010

State environmental officials say New York's bald eagle population may be at its highest level since efforts to restore it began more than 30 years ago.

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The Takeaway

Total Eclipse of the Sun

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Millions of people across Asia were plunged into darkness during the longest eclipse of the century. The total solar eclipse, where the moon blocks the sun, turned day into night for several minutes across southeast Asia. For an eyewitness account The Takeaway turns to Jyotsna Singh, a BBC reporter in Delhi, India.

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The Takeaway

The Secret (Love) Life of Fireflies

Tuesday, June 30, 2009


Summer brings warm evenings dotted by the light of fireflies. The apparently serene scene is full of murder, deception, and secret trysts as the fireflies communicate with each other and try to mate. Joining The Takeaway with more on the passionate life of the firefly is science writer Carl Zimmer. You can read Zimmer's New York Times article on fireflies in today's Science Times, "Blink Twice if You Like Me".

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The Takeaway

A 'Corpse Flower' with the Smell of Death

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

It has deep red flesh. It measures more than six feet high. It blooms only about once a decade. But the most memorable thing about the "Corpse Flower" at the Huntington Botanical Garden is that it gives off the stench of rotting flesh. The Takeaway is joined by Garden Director Jim Folsom, who's in San Marino, California, with the flower, Amorphophallus titanium.

Watch the crowds gather around a blooming corpse flower in this time-lapse video.

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The Takeaway

Could Mosquitoes Bring Disease to Galapagos Reptiles?

Tuesday, June 02, 2009

Biologists have discovered that mosquitoes on the Galapagos have evolved to pierce the skin of reptiles, including iguanas and endangered tortoises. The mosquitoes daily reptilian snack brings a threat of transferring vector-borne disease to the animals. Leaving scientists to ask the question: how can we keep the Galapagos as pristine as when Darwin first found them? Evolutionary biologist Simon J. Goodman joins The Takeaway with more.

Goodman is co-author of the research article, "Natural colonization and adaptation of a mosquito species in Galapagos and its implications for disease threats to endemic wildlife," which was published in this week's issue of the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Here's a view of Galapagos Wildlife:

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The Takeaway

The Tornado Chasers

Monday, May 18, 2009

In the movie “Twister,” a group of renegade scientists chase tornadoes, keeping the audience on the edge of their seats until they were reminded that it’s just fiction. Well, a group of real life scientists are doing just this, but not for the drama, but to really understand how tornadoes form. If we needed any reminder of how deadly tornadoes can be, last week, twisters in Missouri and Oklahoma killed at least two people and destroyed homes and businesses. In an effort to prevent such incidents, the largest and most ambitious study of tornadoes is now underway. The project is named Vortex 2 and involves almost 100 scientists and students from 16 universities and research institutes. Throughout the plains states, scientists are deploying sophisticated technology to better understand the storms. The Takeaway checks in with Katja Friedrich, a meteorologist at the University of Colorado, to learn how they are conducting their experiments, and what they hope to learn.

For another look at the sophisticated science of tornado studies, watch this clip.

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The Takeaway

Saving history: The biologist who protected six million bird-watching notecards

Thursday, April 02, 2009

For nearly 100 years, birds couldn't shake their human paparazzi.

As part of the U.S. government's Bird Migration Program, bird enthusiasts from Kansas to the West Indies tracked down our feathered friends — the Jennifer Anistons of yesteryear — scribbling down notes about their habits: When they came to the area in springtime, where they roosted (and with whom they roosted), and when they flew away for winter.

The note-taking program was first started in 1882 under the leadership of bird expert Wells W. Cook, and it ended in 1970. I spoke with the program's last director, Chandler Robbins, who, at 90, is just three years into his retirement from the United States Geological Survey. Robbins has been protecting the notecards from the incinerator for more than 30 years. He gave us a history of the bird program and told us why it's so important for the two-by-fives to be dusted off and used — before the paper that holds them crumbles away. Click on the LISTEN button below to hear the conversation!
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The Takeaway

Birding gets a digital upgrade

Thursday, April 02, 2009

Starting in 1882 and continuing for almost a century, the United State's Bird Migration Program collected two-by-five notecards from bird watchers around North America. Today, these long preserved cards — did we mention that there were over six million of them? — are being dusted off, in the hopes that they can tell us something about a bird of a different feather: climate change. Jessica Zelt, coordinator of the newly established North American Bird Phenology Program where she is in charge of digitizing the cards, joins the show to tell us more.

Are you itchin' to get your hands on a little American history? You can transcribe the migration notecards into the digital directory from your very own home. Click here to help! Go on, be a part of bird history.

For more, read Molly Webster's Producer's Note

And before we let you go, we'd like to leave you with a little bird quote from our friends here at the Internet, because really, what's the World Wide Web good for if not to root-out some profound, bird-related witticisms? Ahem: "My favorite weather is bird-chirping weather." ~Loire Hartwould

(c) USGS.gov

(c) USGS.gov

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