Streams

 

Nature

Radiolab

Where's My Dinner? It Was Here A Second Ago — The Sandpiper's Dilemma

Monday, July 08, 2013

At first, you couldn't ask for a better meal plan. The food is free, delivered straight to you. It lands, literally, right at your feet. All you have to do is bend over and eat. Except: the portions are very small and tend to slip away rather quickly. That's why sandpipers seem so frantic when you see them at the beach. Their food keeps disappearing.

Read More

Comment

On Being

Gordon Hempton — The Last Quiet Places: Silence and the Presence of Everything [remix]

Thursday, July 04, 2013

Gordon Hempton says that silence is an endangered species. He defines real quiet as presence — not an absence of sound, but an absence of noise. The Earth, as he knows it, is a "solar-powered jukebox" and quiet is a "think tank of the soul."

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Gordon Hempton and Krista Tippett

Thursday, July 04, 2013

Gordon Hempton says that silence is an endangered species. He defines real quiet as presence — not an absence of sound, but an absence of noise. The Earth, as he knows it, is a "solar-powered jukebox" and quiet is a "think tank of the soul."

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Nature and the Citizen Scientist

Monday, April 22, 2013

Akiko Busch, writer, essayist and faculty member at the School of Visual Arts, reflects on her experiences as a citizen observing and documenting the Hudson Valley in her new book, The Incidental Steward: Reflections on Citizen Science (Yale University Press). She also explores the role modern amateur naturalists play in the preservation of place.

Comments [7]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Earth Day: Making the Business Case for Conservation

Monday, April 22, 2013

Mark Tercek, president and CEO of The Nature Conservancy and co-author of Nature's Fortune: How Business and Society Thrive by Investing in Nature (Basic Books, 2013), says  the profit motive should be all the incentive needed for conserving natural resources.

Comments [23]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Boston Aftermath; International Justice; Nature Conservancy

Monday, April 22, 2013

The legal, political, and national security implications of the Boston bombing arrest. Then, Louise Arbour of the International Crisis Group talks about her work and recent news on international justice. Plus: Mark Tercek, president and CEO of The Nature Conservancy, talks about why the profit motive should drive conservation; the rise and potential of citizen science with stories from you on your contributions; and what video games teach us about winning and losing.

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Cicadas Are Coming!

Monday, April 01, 2013

The last time Cicadas appeared in NYC, the Brian Lehrer Show was called "On the Line," there was no such thing as an "embedabble map," and WNYC's Data News team didn't exist. Luckily that's all changed. John Keefe of WNYC Data News discusses their latest project: Cicada Tracker. WNYC is asking citizen scientists around the region to build a detector that reports back soil temperatures. When we begin to see consistent readings of 64° we'll know the cicadas or on their way!

Comments [14]

Soundcheck

The Call Of The Wild! World’s Largest Archive Of Natural Sound Goes Digital

Friday, February 01, 2013

Have 7,513 hours to spare? That’s about how long it would take you to listen through to the entire digital holdings of the Macaulay Library archive of natural sounds.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Your Take: The Most Beautiful Things

Friday, February 01, 2013

Earlier this week we asked you to share stories about experiencing overwhelming beauty, and we've rounded up some of our favorites — tales of double-rainbows, starry skies, sailing under the moon, and even modern art.

Comment

Soundcheck

Noise Pollution: Once In Cities, Now In Seas

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Thanks to humans, the world's oceans today are noisier than ever: Submarine sounds created by commercial ships, air guns and torpedoes have become a major issue -- particularly for mammals like whales and dolphins.

Comment

Radiolab

Brain Fodder Vol. 6

Thursday, December 06, 2012

We don't know about you, but we've got a giant trampoline, a burger refill denied, and buffaloing English grammar on our minds...

Read More

Comments [1]

Radiolab

Krulwich Wonders: Double Thanks

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

NPR

I'm giving thanks in two ways today, first for things that have lasted, persisted (and here's hoping they keep on going), and second -- for change; for our ability to create beauty in new ways. So I'm saying thank you for what's old and what's new.

Read More

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Essay: Life in Danger's Path

Friday, November 02, 2012

John Hockenberry usually wouldn't say it out loud, but sometimes he wonders to himself, 'Are New Yorkers crazy to live so directly in danger's path?' The city has weathered twisters, earthquakes, and now a major hurricane that has left dozens dead and millions without power. Shouldn't we live where it's safe, rather than rebuild where it's not?

Comments [2]

WNYC News

Sweden Wants Your Trash

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Move over Abba, Sweden has found new fame. The small Nordic country is breaking records — in waste. Sweden's program of generating energy from garbage is wildly successful, but recently its success has also generated a surprising issue: There is simply not enough trash.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Rethinking Environmental Policy

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

Daniel Botkin argues that in a world constantly confronted by global environmental problems, establishing effective environmental plans, policies, and laws is more important than ever. His book The Moon in the Nautilus Shell: Discordant Harmonies Reconsidered challenges us to rethink our current conservation policies and to appreciate the complexities of the natural world.

Comments [17]

Radiolab

Murmuration

Monday, September 17, 2012

Inspired by our Emergence episode, Lulu Miller shares a poem and a video that capture that jolt of awe you feel when nature overwhelms you.

Read More

Comments [8]

Features

It's A Panda! Cub Is Born At National Zoo

Monday, September 17, 2012

Officials don't know yet whether it's a male or female. The mother, Mei Xiang, gave birth to Tai Shan (a male) in 2005.

Comment

WNYC News

Florida's Biggest Python So Far Measured 17 Feet, 7 Inches; Had 87 Eggs

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

The giant was captured in Everglades National Park, where managers are struggling to control a booming population of the Southeast Asian species.

Comment

WNYC News

In Kentucky, 2015 Derby Winner Could Arrive Any Day Now

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

From January into June, about 8,000 registered thoroughbred colts and fillies will be born in Kentucky. As 3-year-olds, a few may be Triple Crown contenders. NPR's Noah Adams was there as one was born.

Comment

Features

Not A Record, But Audubon Set Still Sells For A Tidy $7.9 Million

Friday, January 20, 2012

Christie's New York today auctioned off a rare set of John James Audubon's Birds of America. It didn't come close to the record $11.5 million paid for another full set of the books in 2010. But it was still a hefty price.

Comment