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Nature

Radiolab

For the Birds

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Today, a lady with a bird in her backyard upends our whole sense of what we may have to give up to keep a wild creature wild.

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Radiolab

In Real Time

Thursday, July 17, 2014

The finches of Galapagos are an iconic symbol of evolution in action: each species neatly adapted to its island's environment, thanks to enormous time spans and total isolation. But isolation is not so easy to maintain these days. Despite heroic efforts by the government of Ecuador to control the ...

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Radiolab

Resurrection

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Fighting to protect a species is one thing, but what if that species is all but gone -- can you bring it back?  Should you? Or, as Holly Doremus and Josh Donlan argue, have we already changed our world so dramatically that the only way forward is to accept that Nature will never be how it was?  And Gisella Caccone explains ...

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WNYC News

Central Park's Newest Resident: a Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

Monday, June 02, 2014

A bird that usually just passes through Central Park may now be nesting there — for the first time in the park's recorded history. And birders have checked records going back to 1866.

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The Takeaway

Are We Causing the Next Mass Extinction?

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Vast changes in the ecosystem have caused five mass extinctions throughout history. The New Yorker's Elizabeth Kolbert argues that humans are causing the sixth.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Five-Boro Birding

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Spring is in the air, and so are tons of birds. Here's a guide to spotting those red-tailed hawks and swallow-tailed kites as they migrate through New York City.

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Radiolab

Is Planet Earth Under New Management?

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

A hundred million years from now, when we're all dead and gone, a team of geologists will be digging in a field somewhere ...

Robert Krulwich/NPR

... and they will discover, buried in the rocks below, a thin layer of sediment — very thin, ...

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Radiolab

Parents With Noisy Babies Shouldn't Read This. They'll Be Too Jealous

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

If you've ever had to raise a noisy, fussy, crying baby, consider this alternative: I know a bunch of moms who produce newborns that stay blissfully, totally silent (and still!) for weeks and weeks and weeks. Let me make you jealous.

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Radiolab

Can It Be? Pigeons, Geese And White-Tailed Deer Were Once Rare

Monday, February 03, 2014

Passenger pigeons went. Dodos went. Buffalo nearly went. But here's the surprise. Three of the weediest, everywhere-ist animals we know (the common pigeon, the white-tailed deer and Canada geese) — they almost went too! Everything, it turns out, is fragile.

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Radiolab

Goo and You

Friday, January 17, 2014

On a quiet, warm summer day, somewhere in the soil beneath your feet, tucked into a nearby plant, or at the edges of a pond, a tiny little cataclysm is happening: an insect is transforming, undergoing metamorphosis. The chrysalis is easily nature’s best known black box, but it turns out, ...

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Radiolab

A Rain Forest Begins With Rain, Right? Is This A Trick Question?

Thursday, January 09, 2014

This is a "Which came first?" riddle. Not chicken vs. egg. This one is about rain forests. When rain forests begin, do they start with rain ("Yes!" say I) or trees ("No! That's ridiculous!" say I)? I should warn you: Sometimes nature has a sense of humor.

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The Takeaway

Survival of the Cutest for Endangered Species

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

There are all too many endangered species in the wild and precious little money devoted to conservation. So if you had to choose, how would you do it? Not surprisingly, it turns out that animals deemed cute yield bigger donations. This week, NationalGeographic.com is exploring our ideas of conservation in a series called “Last of the Last.” Christine Dell’Amore, news editor for NationalGeographic.com, discusses how we choose which animals to save.

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The Takeaway

POLL: Which Species Would You Save?

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Scientists say that more than 20,000 plants and animals are on the brink of disappearing forever. How do we decide which species to save? Christine Dell'Amore, News Editor for NationalGeographic.com, will help us answer that question tomorrow. In the meantime, The Takeaway has a challenge for you. Here you'll find three photos of three very different creatures—a giant panda, a grey-faced elephant shrew and an American burying beetle. If you could only save just one, which would you pick? Vote in our poll.

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WNYC News

The Snowy Owls Are Saved!

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Ornithologists rejoice! The Port Authority just announced it will stop shooting dead these adorable little white-plumed creatures who have the unfortunate habit of hanging out at our local airports.

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The Takeaway

Symbiotic Relationships & The Circle of Life

Thursday, August 22, 2013

When studying nature, we often focus on predatory relationships. But there are other kinds of relationships in nature as well. Some, like the suckerfish and shark, fall under the category of commensalism. Others, like coral and algae, are built on mutualism, or symbiosis. Katie McKissick, also known as “Beatrice the Biologist” online, explains.

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Radiolab

Mosquito Exclusive! Yes, They Bite, But Half The Time They Miss

Friday, August 09, 2013

You'd figure that mosquitoes, having been on our planet for the last 79 million years, would be really, really good at sucking blood. That's how they feed their young. Surprise! They're kind of bad at it. Today's feature: videos of mosquitoes missing veins and capillaries.

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On Being

David Montgomery — Reading the Rocks: Flood Stories and Deep Time

Thursday, August 01, 2013

David Montgomery reads rocks for a living, and he reveals the fascinating interplay between sacred stories and the stories landscapes proclaim across the ages. He set out to debunk Noah’s Flood, and instead found a richer and more interesting history.

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On Being

[Unedited] David Montgomery with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 01, 2013

David Montgomery reads rocks for a living, and he reveals the fascinating interplay between sacred stories and the stories landscapes proclaim across the ages. He set out to debunk Noah’s Flood, and instead found a richer and more interesting history.

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Radiolab

Getting Cozy With Baby Butterflies ... So Cozy, They Whisper A Wriggly Secret

Saturday, July 20, 2013

You thought, didn't you, that when a caterpillar gets ready to turn itself into a butterfly, it spins itself a cocoon, using silk. I thought that. But, apparently, what happens is different, more like a scene from the movie Alien.

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The Takeaway

The Super-Rich Look to Cultivate the Serengeti of Montana

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Since its inception, American Prairie Reserve has raised $60 million from well-known, ultra-rich donors in an effort to create a national park in Montana that would be about the size of the state of Connecticut, exceeding Yellowstone by a million acres. Pete Geddes is one of the managing directors of the American Prairie Reserve. He joins The Takeaway to discuss the group's efforts and how this privately-backed nature sanctuary would function.

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