Streams

 

Natural Disasters

Freakonomics Radio

Why Do People Keep Having Children?

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Even a brutal natural disaster doesn’t diminish our appetite for procreating. This surely means we’re heading toward massive overpopulation, right? Probably not.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Telecommunications and Competition

Monday, December 03, 2012

David Cay Johnston, Pulitzer-prize winning journalist, Distinguished Visiting Lecturer at Syracuse University, and author of the forthcoming book The Fine Print: How Big Companies Use "Plain English" and Other Tricks to Rob You Blind, talks about his New York Times column on telecom companies, and explains their role during Sandy and in other emergencies.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Coastal Development Pre-Sandy

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

John Rudolf, national reporter for Huffington Post, discusses his new piece, which looks at the history of coastal development in NY and NJ, and how developers and officials ignored warnings about storms.

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The Takeaway

Withstanding a Hurricane: Lessons in Resilience

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Daniel Aldrich and his wife had moved to New Orleans in 2005 and was caught off guard by Hurricane Katrina. The experience inspired the political science professor, to study how communities respond to natural disasters. This has taken him on a journey around the world, researching resilience in India and Japan.

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The Takeaway

Bangkok Braces for Dangerous Floods

Friday, October 14, 2011

In Thailand, flooding has plagued large areas of the country since July, and now it appears to be headed for the city of Bangkok. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra has issued an evacuation warning for suburbs of the area, which caused many citizens there to panic. Flood waters are flowing south toward Bangkok, and have already affected northern parts of the city.

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The Takeaway

FEMA Administrator W. Craig Fugate on Responding to Irene

Thursday, September 01, 2011

As residents of the East Coast begin putting their lives back together after Tropical Storm Irene devastated homes and businesses across the region, questions are being asked about how prepared communities were for the onslaught and whether they have the resources needed to recover quickly. Craig Fugate, administrator of FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, is in charge of preparing and responding to natural disasters like Irene. He's been visiting the areas impacted the most by the storm, and discusses the recovery process.

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The Takeaway

Coastal Residents Evacuate, Brace for Hurricane Irene

Friday, August 26, 2011

Hurricane Irene is charging toward the East Coast with Category 3 power, and meteorologists are warning people from North Carolina up to New England to prepare for the storm, and in some cases evacuate. We've been checking in all week with business owners taking precautions for their shops and homes in the face of this weather.

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Features

High Tide: Animals and Natural Disaster

Friday, August 26, 2011

Toto didn’t warn Dorothy that they were about to be swept off to Oz, but there is a general belief—to some extent supported by science—that animals can sense natural disasters ahead of time.

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The Takeaway

Measure The East Coast Earthquake's Intensity in Your Location

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Yesterday's earthquake, centered in Virginia, shook communities up and down the East Coast. In Washington D.C., it damaged the National Cathedral. In New York, it gave thousands of office workers a late lunch break. What did it do in your neighborhood? All day on our show, we heard responses from listeners giving us their own earthquake story. But now with the help of our friends at Mobile Commons, you can also tell the level of severity of the quake in your zip code. 

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The Takeaway

Storm Tracker: Live Updates on Hurricane Irene's Path and Evacuation

Monday, August 22, 2011

Hurricane Irene is currently headed towards the East Coast of the U.S., and may have a major impact on a large swath of the eastern seaboard and some 65 million residents from North Carolina to Maine. With that in mind, we're watching Irene's progress and updating this blog with the latest news and information we have.

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The Takeaway

Obama Visits Joplin, Mo. for Memorial Service

Monday, May 30, 2011

Sunday, President Obama visited Joplin, Missouri to assure tornado victims that their country would not forget them. The giant tornado killed as many as 136 and destroyed the homes of many more. The president spoke to the people of Joplin during a memorial service for the dead. Truck driver and Joplin resident, Kenneth Irvin shares his impressions of the president's visit and updates us on how he is coping with the damage.  

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The Takeaway

Tornado Survivors Hope to Find Missing Among the Living

Friday, May 27, 2011

There are more than 200 people still missing in Joplin, Missouri, the town hit by a massive tornado on Sunday. That number is down from the original 1500 persons listed in the wake of the destruction, but the death toll on Thursday was at 126, with more than 900 injured. City officials have been working around the clock to locate people or identify bodies in a temporary morgue. Amidst the rubble, there have been miracles — a grandmother found on her porch. But family members across the U.S. still waiting for a sign from loved ones are starting to worry that time is running out.

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The Takeaway

Joplin Mo. Faces $3 Billion Price Tag for Disaster

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Sunday’s massive tornado left six miles of roads, buildings and homes flattened by 200 mile per hour winds and killed at least 122 people. With over 2000 damaged buildings, including a complete shutdown of Joplin’s St. John’s Medical Center, the municipality is facing fiscal damages of at least $3 billion. Through it all, Joplin citizens are still trying to rebuild their lives. Rod Pace, helicopter medic for St. John's, is still working despite the damage done to his place of work. Rob O'Brian, president of the city's Chamber of Commerce discusses the impact on local businesses.

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The Takeaway

Tornado-Ravaged Joplin, Mo. Begins Cleanup

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

On Sunday a deadly tornado devastated Joplin, Missouri; in its wake, a six mile path of destruction and at least 116 people dead. Today its people begin to survey the damage, as rescue efforts for those potentially trapped in the rubble continues. Brian Stelter has been reporting on the disaster for The New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Flood Evacuees Find Shelter in 'Canadaville'

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Mississippi floodwaters are forcing a wave of Americans to flee their homes. Fortunately for those living near Magnaville, Louisiana, there is hope for a new beginning. Situated 120 miles Northeast of New Orleans is a planned community created by a Canadian entrepreneur which served as a long-term solution for those displaced by Hurricane Katrina. Now that Americans living along the Mississippi River face the threat of major flooding, the place known to locals as “Canadaville” is being called on for help once again.

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The Takeaway

Alabama Tornado Spikes Homeless Population

Friday, May 13, 2011

Federal and state emergency officials in Alabama believe that the deadly tornadoes two weeks ago left as many as 10,000 residents homeless. In Tuscaloosa, the urban area hit hardest, people are scrambling for the few remaining apartments — and for low-income residents, affordable housing is almost impossible to find. Officials are concerned that many of the poor, working class and elderly residents could be homeless for good.

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The Takeaway

FEMA Wants $22 Million in Aid Back

Thursday, May 12, 2011

The Federal Emergency Management Agency, better known as FEMA, is asking thousands of Americans to return more than $22 million in government aid. The agency claims that it doled that money erroneously, to disaster victims ineligible for the support. In some cases, individual claimants will be asked to return up to $27,000.

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The Takeaway

Alabama Residents Rebuild After Tornadoes

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

The record number of violent tornadoes that tore through Alabama at the end of April killed hundreds and destroyed millions of dollars worth of property. So it's not a surprise that those communities hit hard by the storms, like Tuscaloosa, Ala., are still rebuilding. Takeaway news writer David Ingram, a longtime Alabama resident, reports on the state's efforts at picking up the pieces. 

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The Takeaway

Mississippi Delta Prepares for More Flooding

Friday, May 06, 2011

All along the Mississippi and Ohio rivers, people are packing up as the flood waters continue to rise, endangering their fields, their homes and their lives. The decision by the Army Corps of Engineers to blast the Birds Point levee in Missouri inundated farmland, but slowed the flooding: water levels in Ohio and further south in Mississippi have dropped considerably. But at the base of the Mississippi Delta, in Vicksburg, Mississippi, people are preparing for the worst — as the water levels are scheduled to crest at 57.5 feet by May 20th.

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The Takeaway

Tornadoes Rip Through South; Hundreds Dead

Friday, April 29, 2011

Deadly tornadoes that ripped through the South on Wednesday claimed some 284 lives. Entire neighborhoods were flattened in the wake of the 160 tornadoes that touched down in six states. We speak with Campbell Robertson, correspondent for our partner The New York Times, who joins us from Tuscaloosa Alabama, one of the areas hardest hit by the storms.

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