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Native American

The Leonard Lopate Show

Infinity of Nations at the National Museum of the American Indian

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Cecile Ganteaume, curator of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian will discuss the New York branch’s exhibition Infinity of Nations: Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian, a permanent exhibition of some 700 works of Native art from throughout North, Central, and South America that shows the breadth of the museum's renowned collection and highlights the historic importance of many of these objects.

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The Takeaway

Descendents of Dakota People March to Remember Tortured Ancestors

Friday, November 12, 2010

This week, descendants of the Dakota people are walking 150 miles through southern Minnesota to remember the 1,700 people who, in 1862, were forced to march to concentration camps as punishment for uprising against the whites. Many people died of starvation and disease along the way, and the survivors were scattered to other parts of the Midwest. 

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Features

CT Native American Tribe Gets a Piece of Broadway

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

A casino resort owned by the Eastern Connecticut Mashantucket Pequot tribe bought a stake in one of Broadway's biggest theaters this week.

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The Takeaway

Summer Reading: 'Empire of the Summer Moon'

Thursday, July 15, 2010

We continue our summer reading series with journalist S.C. Gwynne, who brings us his new book, "Empire of the Summer Moon," about the final battles between Comanche Indians and white settlers. It's the story of the last great chief of the tribe that was once the most powerful in the nation. 

Tell us: What summer reading would you recommend?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Last Stand

Thursday, May 13, 2010

Bestselling author Nathaniel Philbrick tells the tale of two larger-than-life figures: Sitting Bull and George Armstrong Custer.

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The Takeaway

Native American Reservation Struggles with Drug Smugglers

Monday, January 25, 2010

The Tohono O'odham Nation that straddles Mexico and Arizona has found itself at the center of the region's lucrative drug smuggling trade. The reservation is at times overrun by smugglers, and some of the reservation's 28,000 members say they are afraid to leave their homes. Eric Eckholm is covering this story for our partner The New York Times. He reports on how this peaceful reservation now resembles what one tribal chairman calls a "militarized zone."

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WQXR News

U.S. Moves to Settle Dispute with Indian Tribes

Wednesday, December 09, 2009

The government may pay billions to settle longstanding claims.

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Studio 360

In the Land of the Headhunters

Friday, November 07, 2008

Edward Curtis is known for his early 20th-century photos of Native Americans, but he also made a silent movie with an all-indigenous cast, called "In the Land of the Head Hunters." The film is being shown again now, accompanied by a live orchestra - this ...

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Studio 360

Sherman Alexie

Friday, May 18, 2007

Sherman Alexie stays up all night too. The author of The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven and the new novel Flight says it all started when he was a kid when he would stay up waiting for his father to come home. Produced by

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Studio 360

The National Museum of the American Indian

Saturday, September 18, 2004

The National Museum of the American Indian opens in just a few days on the National Mall in Washington, DC. The building itself is strikingly different from the marble halls that surround it, and its grounds evoke Native landscapes right in the center of Washington — with 28,000 ...

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Studio 360

Robby Romero

Saturday, September 18, 2004

Romero is an Apache who spent a lot of his childhood in Hollywood. His parents were in the film industry — his mom once danced in an Elvis movie. But as he got older and started playing music professionally, he found his calling in Native Rock, mixing contemporary folk-rock with ...

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Studio 360

Edward Curtis

Saturday, September 18, 2004

Edward Curtis devoted his life to photographing American Indians. He took nearly 40,000 images in the early years of the 20th century. Curtis’ camera captured the Native people as he saw them: brave, stoic, beautiful — living monuments to America’s past. But the images he created are sometimes deceptive, because ...

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Studio 360

Basket Bridge

Saturday, September 18, 2004

Tucson, Arizona is celebrating one local tribe’s artwork with a new overpass over a 6-lane highway. The bridge is designed with traditional patterns of coyote tracks and lizards used by Tohono O’Odam basketweavers. But, the designer of Tucson’s new bridge isn’t a basket weaver, or ...

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Studio 360

Special Guest: Sherman Alexie

Saturday, September 18, 2004

Sherman Alexie is a poet, novelist and screen writer. He’s the author of more than a dozen books, include Ten Little Indians and The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven — which he adapted into the movie Smoke Signals, a classic of Native film. In 1999, the ...

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Studio 360

Sherman Alexie

Saturday, April 24, 2004

Sherman Alexie grew up on the Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington State, and he's written novels, movies, poetry and essays exploring modern Native American life. He called his first collection of stories The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven. We asked Alexie to read a poem he'd ...

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Studio 360

Intentional Flaws

Saturday, January 04, 2003

There's a common notion that Navajo weavers have a tradition of deliberately including a small error into each rug or blanket they make. But is it true? Three weavers in New Mexico talk about this concept of the purposeful artistic flaw. Produced by Deborah Begel.

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