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Native American

The Takeaway

Language & Politics Divide Navajo Nation

Thursday, October 23, 2014

A Navajo Nation presidential candidate just got booted off the ballot because, like many young people in the tribe, he can't speak Navajo fluently. Now some wonder if the law is fair. 

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The Takeaway

Celebrating Indigenous People Instead of Columbus

Monday, October 13, 2014

This year, Minneapolis is celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day instead of Columbus Day for the first time. 

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The Takeaway

Alaska Sees Possibility of First Native Governor

Friday, August 22, 2014

Alaskan gubernatorial candidate Byron Mallott could become the state's first Native American governor, and only the second in the country's history.

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The Takeaway

Pipeline Leaks Into Native American Land

Monday, July 14, 2014

North Dakota is suffering yet another pipeline leakage—this time into a bay on a Native American reserve. The pipeline had leaked more than one million gallons of saltwater brine, an unwanted byproduct of oil and natural gas production.

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The Takeaway

Obama Makes Historic Visit to Indian Country

Friday, June 13, 2014

President Obama will visit the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe today in what is only the third visit to Indian country by a sitting president in the last 80 years. Like many reservations, Standing Rock faces unemployment and poverty rates that far exceed the rest of the United States.

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The Takeaway

Native Americans: The Next to Legalize Marijuana?

Friday, May 23, 2014

The dire need for a boost to the economy is why the Oglala Lakota Tribal Council's economic committee started looking into legalizing marijuana on the reservation this year. Many say it is something that tribe members of all ages seemed interested in.

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The Takeaway

Renewed Call to Change Redskins Mascot Raises Questions About Global Brands

Friday, July 05, 2013

A call for the Washington Redskins to change their name is picking up steam again in Washington with the announcement last month that 10 members of Congress spoke out against the franchise’s mascot. But Redskins executives are adamant about maintaining the tradition inherent in their name and mascot, and say it would be incredibly difficult to change. Suzan Shown Harjo is a Native American activist who filed a lawsuit against the team in 1992, which was won and then later overturned. Gabe Feldman is the director of Tulane University’s Sports Law Program.

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The Takeaway

Movie Date: 'The Lone Ranger,' 'Despicable Me 2,' 'Kevin Hart: Let Me Explain'

Thursday, July 04, 2013

When's the last time Johnny Depp played an average, regular guy? What exactly are those yellow egg-shaped things in the "Despicable Me" movies? And does Kevin Hart really need to explain anything? These and other questions are explored in the newest Movie Date podcast, as Rafer and Kristen review "The Lone Ranger," "Despicable Me 2," and "Kevin Hart: Let Me Explain." To help them with "The Lone Ranger," and specifically with the depiction of Tonto, they're joined by Rick Chavolla, Education and Development Officer at the American Indian Community House in New York.

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The Takeaway

The Politics of Johnny Depp as Tonto

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Johnny Depp plays Tonto, a Native America character, in the new Disney film “The Lone Ranger.” With Depp in the role, the long tradition of non-Native actors playing Tonto continues, which began back in 1933. But it’s not 1933 anymore—it’s 2013. Why does Hollywood still struggle in its depictions of Native peoples? Adrienne Keene is a blogger and activist with Native Appropriations, a website that examines the representations of native peoples in media. She joins The Takeaway to discuss her thoughts on the film, and the depiction of Tonto.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Mayan Time

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Jose Barreiro, assistant director for research at the National Museum of the American Indian, offers a fact-based account of the much discussed Mayan calendar and explains how contemporary Mayan culture is alive and well.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Sherman Alexie

Monday, October 15, 2012

Sherman Alexie talks about his 20-year, 20-book career as a writer known for his irreverent observations of life among Native Americans in the Pacific Northwest. His newest collection, Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories, which includes 15 classics with 15 new stories in one anthology.

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The Takeaway

Lost Languages Find a New Voice in Radio

Friday, August 17, 2012

If you’re a regular listener to the radio station KUYI in Keams Canyon, Arizona, you probably hear Native American intro music a lot. That’s because KUYI is one of roughly 50 stations that broadcasts on Native American lands to Native American listeners. And to boot, they broadcast in Native American languages, which are otherwise falling into widespread disuse.

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The Takeaway

New Discovery Complicates America's Migrant History

Friday, July 13, 2012

The migratory history of North America has been dominated by the idea of a single, massive wave of migrants traveling from Asia to North America. But a recent report casts doubts upon this theory and suggests that there were at least three migratory crossings that laid the foundations of the New World.

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The Takeaway

Follow Friday: Romney's Gay Spokesman, Newt Gingrich Drops Out

Friday, May 04, 2012

Every Friday, The Takeaway convenes a panel to look back at the week's big stories. This week, we'll hear more about Newt Gingrich pulling out of the Presidential race; Richard Grenell, the openly gay foreign policy spokesperson who resigned from Mitt Romney's campaign just days after joining it; and Elizabeth Warren's Native American heritage. Ron Christie is a Takeaway contributor and Republican political strategist. And Farai Chideya is ajournalist and blogger.

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The Takeaway

Obama Set To Meet Native American Tribal Leaders

Friday, December 02, 2011

As a candidate in 2008, Barack Obama promised to improve the relationship between Washington and American Indian tribes. This year's meeting between the President and tribal leaders is the third such meeting, and comes with many Native Americans approving of the President's outreach effort to their community.

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The Takeaway

The Fight to Be Called Cherokee

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

White Americans were not the only ones who kept black slaves in the pre-Civil War era. Until an 1886 treaty that freed their slaves, black slavery was also a part of the Cherokee nation. Generations later, black descendants of those freed slaves, who went on to become part of the Cherokee tribe, are fighting for their right to keep their status as members of the Cherokee nation. Many Cherokee now want to push the freedmen out, unless they can prove they are of blood descent, saying that the treaty of 1866 did not give those freed slaves citizenship.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Mann v. Ford

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Co-directors Maro Chermayeff and Micah Fink discuss their documentary “Mann v. Ford,” about one of the worst environmental disasters in the United States, which was located just 19 miles from New York City. This toxic Superfund site is at the former home of the Ford Motor Plant in Mahwah, NJ, where thousands of cars were produced, along with toxic paint sludge, which was dumped on nearby Ramapough Mountain Indian land. This film tells the story of Wayne Mann, the leader of a small Native American community, who stands up to Ford. “Mann Vs Ford” is playing July 18 at 9 pm on HBO.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Geronimo(!)

Friday, May 06, 2011

Tonya Gonella Frichner, president and founder of the American Indian Law Alliance, recent North American Regional Representative to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, and Ben Zimmer, executive producer of the Visual Thesaurus and Vocabulary.com, discuss the controversy over the use of an  American Indian hero, Geronimo, as the code-name for the Bin Laden operation. 

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The Takeaway

Codename Geronimo: Offensive to Native Americans?

Thursday, May 05, 2011

"Geronimo" — that was the codename given to America’s most hated man, the world’s most hunted terrorist, and the object of one of our most high profile military missions ever. But now, many are taking issue with the United States government associating Osama bin Laden with an iconic Native American leader. And the Fort Still Apache Tribe in Oklahoma is asking President Obama for an apology. We talk with Jeff Houser, Tribal Chairman of the Fort Sill Apache Tribe.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Killing of Crazy Horse

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Thomas Powers discusses Crazy Horse, the greatest Indian warrior of the nineteenth century whose victory over General Custer at the battle of Little Bighorn in 1876 was the worst defeat inflicted on the frontier Army. In The Killing of Crazy Horse, Powers pieces together his death, which has remained a controversy for more than a century.

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