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National Security

The Takeaway

In Decade Since 9/11, FBI Head Leaves Mark on Bureau

Friday, May 13, 2011

President Barack Obama is asking Congress to extend the term of Federal Bureau of Investigations Director Robert S. Mueller III for two years. Mueller was sworn in as the head of the F.B.I. just seven days before the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2011 — an event that marked the greatest challenge ever for the nation and the bureau's 93-year history. Mueller has led the FBI in preventing attacks like the Christmas Day shoe-bomber and stopping al-Qaida operative Najibullah Zazi who was headed for New York City in 2009 to blow himself up. For more on how Mueller changed the FBI and who might be qualified to replace him, we talk with Barton Gellman, contributing editor at large for Time Magazine, a research fellow at NYU's Center on Law and Security, and author of Angler: The Cheney Vice Presidency.” He wrote an article on Mueller and the future of the FBI for this week's Time Magazine.

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The Takeaway

NYPD Nab Terror Suspects in Plot

Friday, May 13, 2011

Two men have been caught conspiring to bomb synagogues in Manhattan in an undercover sting. The New York Police Department, who led the operation, say Ahmed Ferhani and Mohamed Mamdouh purchased weapons and an inert hand grenade from undercover officers, after saying that they were planning a terror attack. There is no indication the two are affiliated with a terrorist organization. Joining The Takeaway is Robert Hennelly, senior reporter for our flagship station, WNYC.

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The Takeaway

New York Police Ramp Up Security for Obama's Visit

Thursday, May 05, 2011

President Obama is in New York today to pay his respects at Ground Zero and meet with family members of victims of 9/11. Whenever the president is in town, the New York Police Department is on heightened security. But this time, they will be keeping the status quo. The NYPD’s 35,000 officers have been on alert since Sunday night when the White House announced Osama bin Laden’s death. Officers have been working overtime to protect subways during rush hour and have been commanded to be on the lookout for suspicious packages at landmarks. Police officials say there have been no specific threats against the city, but New York is still a prime target for terrorist attacks. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The CIA After Bin Laden's Death

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

Legacy of Ashes author Tim Weiner joins us to look at how the death of Osama Bin Laden changes the public profile of the CIA. We’ll also look at the agency’s long history of targeted killings.

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The Takeaway

PJ Crowley on Osama Bin Laden's Death

Monday, May 02, 2011

Former spokesperson for the State Department PJ Crowley has an intimate knowledge of the U.S. government's mission to find Osama Bin Laden and bring him to justice over the last decade. Crowley joins us now, and reacts to the breaking news announced last night that the U.S. military did indeed kill and capture the 9/11 mastermind's body. George McAvoy, a New York resident whose brother died on 9/11 also speaks with us.

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The Takeaway

Osama Bin Laden Dead, 9/11 Family Members and Others Celebrate in Times Square

Monday, May 02, 2011

While a large gathering at the World Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan featured cheers, tears, and even the popping of champagne, a somewhat smaller but still-jubilant gathering was happening in Times Square early in the morning.

A few hundred people, waving flags, chanting "USA" and even singing the song "Don't Stop Believing" by American power ballad band Journey packed into the middle of the street at 42nd, as onlookers and journalists on the periphery watched.

Watch the video and slideshow below:

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The Brian Lehrer Show

National Security Switch

Friday, April 29, 2011

Stephen Walt, professor of international affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and writes a blog for Foreign Policy, talks about the reshuffling of Obama's national security team.

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National Security Switch

Friday, April 29, 2011

WNYC
Petraeus is not popular with the Pakistani Armed Forces and intelligence services, there’s been a lot of friction between them… My assumption is that President Obama decided that was a cost he was willing to bear.

Stephen Walt, professor of international affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Blurred Line: Military and Intelligence

Friday, April 29, 2011

What does it mean that Gen. David Petraeus is taking over at the CIA? Traditionally, there has been a line between military and civilian intelligence spheres, though personnel crossover is a trend. Is the line between the two areas blurring? We speak with Paul Pillar, 28-year CIA veteran and visiting Georgetown University professor, to understand the changing relationship between the CIA and the military. We also talk with Loch Johnson, professor of political science at University of Georgia, about some of the same issues. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: More Questions from the Guantanamo Papers

Thursday, April 28, 2011

The release this week of government files on detainees at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay have given us an unprecedented glimpse into the camp and the people who have been held there. The Miami Herald’s Carol Rosenberg looks at what they do and don’t tell us about the Guantanamo system.

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The Takeaway

President Obama Shuffles National Security Team

Thursday, April 28, 2011

President Obama is expected to announce this week new appointments for top posts in his national security team. Leon Panetta, the current director of central intelligence, will be named as defense secretary. General David Petraeus, who is currently the top commander in Afghanistan, is expected to be named as director of the CIA. These announcements come as Defense Secretary Robert Gates plans on stepping down from his post this summer. We talk with Mark Landler, reporter for our partner The New York Times, to help preview Obama's new national security team.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Vermin in the Sky

Thursday, February 24, 2011

The New Yorker staff writer Tad Friend discusses asteroids and the United States’ planetary defense strategy. The Obama Administation proposed increasing NASA's budget for planetary defense to $20.3 million. Tad Friend's article "Vermin in the Sky" is in the February 28th issue of The New Yorker.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Omar Suleiman and the CIA

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Egypt’s new vice president, Omar Suleiman, has been heading up negotiations with the opposition. He’s also been described as “the CIA’s man in Cairo.” Lisa Hajjar, associate professor at University of California at Santa Barbara, examines Mr. Suleiman’s relationship with our government and his role in controversial U.S. rendition and interrogation operations in Egypt.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Osama bin Laden

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

Michael Scheuer, the chief of the CIA's bin Laden unit from 1996 to 1999 and a counterterrorism analyst until 2004, explains why Osama bin Laden continues to be a significant and powerful figure—he’s devout, talented, patient, ruthless, and a formidable, implacable enemy of the West. In Osama Bin Laden, Scheuer shows bin Laden to be a figure of remarkable leadership skills, strategic genius, and considerable communication abilities.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Computer Viruses and Worms

Friday, January 21, 2011

This week’s Please Explain is about computer worms and viruses. Richard Ford, from the Center for Security Science at the Florida Institute of Technology, and Lance Ulanoff, Editor in Chief of PC Magazine, tell us how viruses and worms are created, how they infiltrate individual computers, explain the damage they can wreak and how we can best protect our machines.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Are We Safer?

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post reporter Dana Priest discusses her investigation into the so-called terrorism-industrial complex that has sprung up after 9/11. Frontline’s “Are We Safer?” airs on PBS at 9 pm, January 18. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Airport Security in Israel

Friday, January 14, 2011

Ben Gurion airport in Israel has not had a terrorism incident since 1972. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano recently visited Israel to assess their systems find out what makes them successful. Israeli security expert Rafi Sela joins us to outline the different approaches of airport security in Israel and the United States, and what the TSA can do to more effectively screen for terrorists.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

America’s Wars in the Age of Obama

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Stephen L. Carter, Professor of Law at Yale, discusses President Barack Obama's views on war and what they mean for America and its role in military conflicts. The Violence of Peace: America’s Wars in the Age of Obama looks at the implications of the military philosophy Obama has adopted during his first two years in office. It also explores how the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are shaping Pres. Obama’s views of the country's role in conflict and peace.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Lockheed Martin and the Military-Industrial Complex

Thursday, January 06, 2011

January 17th marks the 50th anniversary of President Dwight Eisenhower’s famous speech on the military-industrial complex. William Hartung, director of the New America Foundation’s Arms and Security Initiative, discusses the history of Lockheed Martin—the nation's largest weapons contractor. His book Prophets of War traces the company's rise from military aircraft manufacturer in WWI, to a major supplier of fighters and bombers for the Allies in WWII, to corporate behemoth with a major role in setting American foreign policy.

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The Takeaway

US Government Expands Domestic Monitoring

Monday, December 20, 2010

A new story in The Washington Post details a vast expansion of the United States' monitoring of its citizens for the purpose of fighting domestic terrorism threats. Reportedly the largest and most technologically sophisticated system of data-gathering in U.S. History, the new apparatus uses techniques developed in wars overseas to scrutinize the activities of Americans. Dana Priest, who helped report the story, which covered several months and used over 1000 documents, joins us now to talk about the new apparatus, which is part of an exploding national security market around the country. 

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