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National Security

The Leonard Lopate Show

Inside the FBI's Manufactured War on Terrorism

Friday, February 01, 2013

Trevor Aaronson talks about his investigation into how the FBI has, under the guise of engaging in counterterrorism since 9/11, built a network of more than 15,000 informants whose primary purpose is to infiltrate Muslim communities to create and facilitate phony terrorist plots so that the Bureau can then claim it is winning the war on terror. The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI's Manufactured War on Terrorism reveals information about the FBI's paid informants and documents the methods the FBI uses to ensnare Muslims in terrorist plots.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Secret History of Torture

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Investigative journalist Ian Cobain argues that while the United Kingdom does not “participate in, solicit, encourage or condone” torture, when it’s faced with potential threats to national security, the rules change. His book A Secret History of Torture, shows how, from World War II to the War on Terror, the West has repeatedly and systematically resorted to torture, bending the law, and turning a blind eye. He draws on previously unseen official documents and the accounts of witnesses, victims and experts.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rise of the Drones

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Peter Yost talks about his NOVA documentary “Rise of the Drones.” Drones are the next chapter in aviation history and are revolutionizing warfare.  NOVA gains unprecedented access to engineers and labs, military experts, pilot training facilities to show how engineers are taking the pilot out of the cockpit with stunning new advances in this game-changing technology to explore if these could become part of our everyday lives here at home.  “Rise of the Drones” airs on PBS at 9 pm January 23.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Julia Angwin on the National Counterterrorism Center's Power

Friday, January 11, 2013

Wall Street Journal Reporter Julia Angwin discusses the National Counterterrorism Center’s  new authority to access and keep data about innocent U.S. citizens for up to five years, and to analyze it for suspicious patterns of behavior even if there is no reason to suspect them. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Collected Stories

Friday, January 11, 2013

Andy Borowitz fills in for Leonard Lopate. We start the show with a Please Explain look at the top science stories of 2012! George Saunders talks about his new short story collection, Tenth of December. Michael Cannell tells the story of a California mechanic who became the first American-born driver to win the Grand Prix. And the Wall Street Journal’s Julia Angwin discusses the new powers given to the National Counterterrorism Center to collect information on Americans, even if they have not been suspected of a crime.

The Brian Lehrer Show

After Petraeus

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Fred Kaplan, War Stories columnist for Slate, talks about his new book, The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War, and the president’s choices for his second-term national security team.

→ EVENT: Fred Kaplan will be reading from The Insurgents at the UWS Barnes & Noble on Jan. 15 at 7PM.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The State of Things

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Fred Kaplan of Slate talks about his new book on David Petraeus and continues the discussion on President Obama's picks for his next national security team, including Chuck Hagel. Plus: Analysis of Governor Christie's State of the State address; reaction to yesterday's federal ruling that limits NYPD stop-and-frisk procedures; and background on Tibet's recent increase in self-immolation protests.

On The Media

The NCTC: Obama's "Pre-Crime Squad"?

Friday, January 04, 2013

Last March, the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) was granted unprecedented power to collect data on ordinary U.S. citizens, data like flight records or lists of casino employees. Critics have likened the NCTC to the "Pre-Crime Squad" in the movie "Minority Report." Wall Street Journal reporter Julia Angwin talks with Bob about this dramatic shift in the intelligence community's power over US citizens.

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On The Media

National Security Letters and Gag Orders

Friday, January 04, 2013

The most serious kind of subpoena - called a 'National Security Letter' - used to have a lifetime gag-order automatically attached. That is until Nicholas Merrill appealed his and won the right to talk about it. Despite 50,000 national security letters a year, there are only three organizations that have ever won the right to say they got one. In a segment that originally aired in January of 2011, Nick Merrill tells Bob why he's the exception and the rule.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Kurt Eichenwald on the Secrets and Lies in the Terror Wars

Monday, December 31, 2012

Kurt Eichenwald recounts the first 500 days after 9/11, looking closely at the decisions, deceptions, and delusions of the 18 months that changed the world forever, as leaders raced to protect their citizens in the wake of 9/11. In 500 Days: Secrets and Lies in the Terror Wars, he moves from the Oval Office to Number 10 Downing Street, from Guantanamo Bay to the CIA headquarters, from the al-Qaeda training camps to the torture chambers of Egypt and Syria.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: I Don't Care about the Petraeus Scandal, and Neither Should You

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Can we stop to think for a second about how staggeringly pointless it is to expect sexual and moral purity from the head of the CIA?

Read More

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: US Drones Strikes and the "Disposition Matrix"

Thursday, October 25, 2012

During Monday's Presidential debate, moderator Bob Schieffer asked just one question about U.S. drone-strikes, despite the fact that the controversial drone program is now one of the cornerstones of the country's counter-terrorism policy. Washington Post intelligence reporter Greg Miller tells us about his investigation of a next-generation targeting list called the “disposition matrix.” He's written about it in the Washington Post's special report, the Permanent War.

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The Takeaway

Don't Mention It: Patriot Act

Thursday, October 04, 2012

How did this hot issue become a non-issue? Has the country forgotten about the Patriot Act? Or do the candidates just hope that we have? Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham University's School of Law takes a closer look as part of The Takeaway's Don't Mention It Series.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Somebody's Watching You

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

Wall Street Journal reporter Julia Angwin explains the rise of license plate tracking and how surveillance of seemingly mundane activities is growing. Her article, "New Tracking Frontier: Your License Plates," written with Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, appeared in the September 29 issue of The Wall Street Journal.

Comments [23]

The Takeaway

Is Obesity Threatening Our National Security?

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Twenty-seven percent of Americans aged 17 to 24 are too fat to serve in the United States military. Add that number to those who cannot serve because they have a criminal record or have not graduated from high school, and that means 75 percent of our nation's youth are not eligible to serve in uniform. General Norman Seip, is a retired Air Force General and a member of Mission: Readiness.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Kurt Eichenwald on 500 Days

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Kurt Eichenwald recounts the first 500 days after 9/11, looking closely at the decisions, deceptions, and delusions of the 18 months that changed the world forever, as leaders raced to protect their citizens in the wake of 9/11. In 500 Days: Secrets and Lies in the Terror Wars, he moves from the Oval Office to Number 10 Downing Street, from Guantanamo Bay to the CIA headquarters, from the al-Qaeda training camps to the torture chambers of Egypt and Syria. He reveals new information from the terror wars, including never before reported details about warrantless wiretapping, the anthrax attacks and investigations, and conflicts between Washington and London.

Comments [13]

The Takeaway

Historic CIA Kidnapping Case Back in the Limelight

Friday, July 13, 2012

In 2003, an Egyptian terrorist suspect was abducted and flown to Egypt, where he says he was tortured and interrogated by the CIA. Years later, several Americans were indicted in Italy and found guilty in absentia for kidnapping. Now one has the chance to have her conviction overturned.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Rajiv Chandrasekaran on the War for Afghanistan

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Washington Post correspondent Rajiv Chandrasekaran discusses America’s troubled war in Afghanistan. His new book Little America: The War Within the War for Afghanistan is an account of the surge, which he argues was sabotaged not only by Afghan and Pakistani malfeasance but by infighting and incompetence within the American government. Chandrasekaran examines the challenges of U.S. intervention there, and gives an eye-opening look at the complex relationship between America and Afghanistan.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

David Sanger on Obama's Secret Wars

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

 David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for the New York Times, discusses President Obama’s use of new tools and weapons—cyberwar against Iran, drone attacks in Pakistan, and increasing reliance on the Special Forces to hunt al-Qaeda. Sanger’s new book, Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power, provides a look inside the Obama adminis­tration’s national security decisions.

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The Takeaway

Holder Attempts to Plug the Leak

Monday, June 11, 2012

Over the weekend, Attorney General Eric Holder announced two investigations into the leaks: one for the Stuxnet operation in Iran and one for the now well-known drone program. Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich discusses how these investigations could play out.

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