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The Takeaway

Hollywood Legend Peter O'Toole Dead at 81

Monday, December 16, 2013

Peter O'Toole, the Hollywood legend who was made famous in his title role in Lawrence of Arabia, died on Saturday at the age of 81. He was born in Ireland and raised in England, but he came to be known around the globe. "Ireland, and the world, has lost one of the giants of film and theater," said Irish President Michael Higgins. O'Toole's acting career began on stage in England as a teenager, later moving on to television roles in the 1950s and then the big screen. Today The Takeaway remembers Peter O'Toole.

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The Takeaway

Glenn Greenwald: The U.S. Is Not Safer Since 9/11 | Wheels of Justice Slowly Turning at Gitmo | Supervolcano Bigger Than Previously Thought

Monday, December 16, 2013

Glenn Greenwald: The U.S. Is Not Safer Since 9/11 | Wheels of Justice Slowly Turning at Gitmo | Hollywood Legend Peter O'Toole Dead at 81 | Forget Detroit, Puerto Rico Is In Big Trouble | Supervolcano Bigger Than Previously Thought

The Takeaway

Ex-FBI Agent That Disappeared in Iran Actually on Rogue CIA Mission

Friday, December 13, 2013

More than 6 years ago, Robert Levinson, a former FBI agent, disappeared in Iran. He has been presumed to be a hostage of some kind, a designation that the U.S. government has not taken issue with. But now it turns out that Levinson may actually be a casualty of a CIA operation gone wrong. Tim Weiner is a former reporter for our partner The New York Times and author of "Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA" and "Enemies: The History of the FBI." He joins The Takeaway to discuss Levinson's case.

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The Takeaway

The Speaker of the House is Fed Up

Friday, December 13, 2013

What has gotten into John Boehner? The normally pliant Speaker looks like he has had enough of rigid Tea Party conditions and attitudes. He fears that these newest members of Congress, and the organizations that back them, are taking the GOP brand over the deep end—and he's fed up with it. Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's D.C. Correspondent, helps us understand the sudden shift in Speaker Boehner's perspective.

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The Takeaway

South Dakota Pleads for Farm Bill Extension

Friday, December 13, 2013

In October, an early blizzard killed tens of thousands of cattle in South Dakota and Nebraska. Ordinarily after this kind of turmoil farmers can expect disaster relief funding through the Farm Bill—but this year that relief is in limbo. Joining The Takeaway to discuss the importance of the Farm Bill is Gary Cammack, a South Dakota Republican state representative and a rancher who lost more than 100 of his own cows and calves in the storm. 

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The Takeaway

Seeking the Gift of Kindness in the Wake of Sandy Hook | The Speaker of the House is Fed Up | Kim Jong Un Executes Uncle, Nation's Defacto No. 2

Friday, December 13, 2013

Kim Jong Un Executes Uncle, Nation's Defacto No. 2 | After Sandy Hook, Elementary Schools Prioritize Safety | Gun Sales on the Rise a Year After Newtown | New Movie Releases: 'Saving Mister Banks' and 'The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug' | South Dakota Pleads for Farm Bill Extension | ...

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The Takeaway

U.S. Cuts Off Non-Lethal Aid to Syrian Rebels

Thursday, December 12, 2013

The U.S. has long supported the effort that encourages the ouster of Syria's President Bashar al-Assad from power. Yesterday, the Obama administration announced that it would stop sending nonlethal aid—like food and medical supplies—to the moderate opposition in Syria, at least temporarily. Andrew Tabler, a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and author of "In The Lion's Den: An Eyewitness account of Washington's Battle with Syria," joins The Takeaway to discuss these latest developments.

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The Takeaway

The 'New Rich' and What It Means to be Wealthy

Thursday, December 12, 2013

"A lot of these people are people who had one good year," says Harvard Business Professor Michael Norton on Americans considered "rich."

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The Takeaway

The Case Against Nukes, Even in Peacetime

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

About 62 percent of Americans think no nation should have a nuclear arsenal—not even the U.S. Globally, the world's nuclear powers have 17,000 weapons combined—a number that's growing. Joe Cirincione is president of Ploughshares Fund and author of "Nuclear Nightmares: Securing the World Before It Is Too Late." In his new book, he argues that the proliferation of nuclear weapons poses a real threat to us all—even in times of safety and peace. 

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The Takeaway

The Economic Impact of the Volcker Rule

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

This week, financial regulatory agencies officially approved the Volcker Rule, passed as the centerpiece of the Dodd-Frank Act in June 2010. Kathryn Wylde, Deputy Chair of the Board of the Federal Reserve of New York, compares the final iteration of the Volcker Rule to what Volcker originally devised, and describes how the Rule might influence the U.S.'s economic future. 

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The Takeaway

A Nostalgic Look at Iran's Classic Car | Bipartisan Deal Reached on Budget | Ouster in North Korea Leaves World Watching

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

The Economic Impact of the Volcker Rule | Mary T. Barra Named CEO of General Motors | Paykan: A Nostalgic Look at Iran's Classic Car | Bipartisan Deal Reached on Budget | Ouster in North Korea Leaves World Watching | Securing the World's Nuclear Aresnal

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The Takeaway

Bipartisan Deal Reached on Budget

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

There must be something in the water in Washington, D.C.—it's another day and another bipartisan deal has gone through. House Republicans and Senate Democrats struck a budget deal a whole 35 days before the January 15 deadline when the government would run out of money. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, breaks down what's in the deal.

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The Takeaway

Carrying Forward Mandela's Legacy

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Today leaders from around the world converged on South Africa to pay their final respects to Nelson Mandela. "After this great liberator is laid to rest, when we have returned to our cities and villages, and rejoined our daily routines, let us search then for his strength—for his largeness of spirit—somewhere inside ourselves,” President Barack Obama said during the ceremony. As we remember Madiba, The Takeaway is asking you how America can carry forward the legacy of Nelson Mandela.

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The Takeaway

How Much Power Should the E.P.A. Have?

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Today the Supreme Court hears arguments in the case Environmental Protection Agency vs. EME Homer City Generation. At the heart of the case is the question of who has the power to act on issues of controlling environmental hazards. Jeff Holmstead is a former assistant administrator for the E.P.A. who is now an attorney with the firm Bracewell and Giuliani. While the Obama Administration defends the E.P.A.'s right to regulation, Holmstead disagrees. 

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The Takeaway

The Battle for the Future of the N.S.A.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Revelations by former N.S.A. contractor Edward Snowden have set of a fierce debate over national security and personal privacy, and the debate has become particularly intense for the Senate Intelligence Committee itself. Ryan Lizza, Washington correspondent for The New Yorker, discusses the past, present and possible future of the N.S.A. in his piece that appears in the latest issue of the magazine.

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The Takeaway

Deal Reached on Military Sexual Assault Bill

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

The House and Senate have come to a compromise on a bill that would strengthen protections for victims of sexual assault in the military and keep Guantanamo Bay open. The measure is the first change to laws governing sexual assault in the military in years. There were 3,553 sexual assault complaints reported in the first three quarters of this fiscal year—a nearly 50 percent increase. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, walks us through the ins and outs of this deal.

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The Takeaway

The Myth of Race & Its Historical Consequences

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Race is embedded the fabric of American culture, and racial categories and their implications persist today. In "A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama's America," Jacqueline Jones, professor of history at the University of Texas, Austin, argues against our continued use of racial categories—at least in the ways Americans have used these categories since the country's founding. 

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The Takeaway

The Road Ahead for Syria & the OPCW

Monday, December 09, 2013

On Tuesday, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons will accept their Nobel Peace Prize in Stockholm. Last month, they triumphantly met their deadline for the removal of Syria’s weapons cache. Though much progress has been made, there is still a great deal of work left to be done. Sigrid Kaag, special coordinator of the joint mission of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the United Nations, provides a look ahead at the OPCW's timeline for destroying all of the weapons.

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The Takeaway

How to Combat Poverty: Lessons from History

Monday, December 09, 2013

As the president and Congress debate the minimum wage and the efficacy of food stamps, a new book by Dr. Mical Raz challenges the underpinnings of our understanding of poverty and how best to combat it. In "What's Wrong with the Poor?: Psychiatry, Race and the War on Poverty," Dr. Raz argues that the theory of deprivation—which drove the Johnson Administration's approach to policy-making—led policy-makers to ignore structural inequality.

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The Takeaway

Hundreds of Thousands Take to Ukrainian Streets

Monday, December 09, 2013

Hundreds of thousands of protesters took to the streets of Ukraine on Sunday to take part in demonstrations against the government. During the unrest in the capital city of Kiev, protesters showed their anger by smashing a statue of the Russian revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin. The latest protest was the largest yet in almost three weeks. David Herszenhorn, reporter for our partner The New York Times, joins us from the site of the protest in Kiev.

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