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The Takeaway

Is it Enough to Tell Gay Kids 'It Gets Better'?

Thursday, October 14, 2010

On Tuesday, we spoke to writer and advice columnist Dan Savage about his message to young gay people: Hold on, it gets better. We got a call from one gay listener who thinks that message just isn't enough. "Stephen," (not his real name) says that in order to address the recent spate of suicides among gay teens, teachers and other adults should work on making life better for teenagers right now.

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The Takeaway

Moratorium on Deep Water Drilling Lifted

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Deep water drilling can resume in the Gulf of Mexico; the federal government lifted its moratorium on deepwater drilling yesterday.

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The Takeaway

How Does it Get Better?

Monday, October 11, 2010

A few weeks ago, Dan Savage started a video project where gays around the country tell gay kids that life gets better when you get older. We'll talk to Dan tomorrow, but we're looking for your stories now. What would you tell kids — gay or straight — gets better when you're an adult? What did you struggle with that you'd like to tell kids will be okay?

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Debates; Foreclosures and Economic Indicators

Monday, October 11, 2010

Every Monday, we take a look at the big stories in the week ahead. This week's Agenda, covers foreclosures, midterm elections, calls for UN peace keepers in  Sudan and the Nobel Prize in Economics.

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The Takeaway

China As A Political Scapegoat, And A Call For Congress To Play Nice

Monday, October 11, 2010

Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif), is pulling no punches in her campaign against former HP CEO Carly Fiorina in California, and she's raising a now-familiar bogeyman: China. One of her recent ads tied Fiorina to her decision to outsource thousands of American jobs to China.  Boxer is not the only candidate doing this. Many politicians across the country are using China as a political scapegoat in their bid to win.

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The Takeaway

Liu Xiaobo Wins Nobel Peace Prize While Serving 11 Year Sentence in China

Friday, October 08, 2010

Described as a chain-smoking, impassioned literary critic and political essayist, he has spent his adult life advocating for democratic reform in China. Today, he becomes the first Chinese citizen to win the Nobel Peace Prize. And as of now, it is unclear how he will receive that news in his prison cell.

Liu Xiaobo is the winner of the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize in recognition of his nonviolent political reform movement. The 54-year-old is months into an 11 year prison sentence for "inciting the subversion of state power."

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The Takeaway

Lou Dobbs and Undocumented Immigrants: It's Complicated

Thursday, October 07, 2010

Lou Dobbs made a name for himself on cable TV for railing against illegal immigrants and the businesses that hire them. But a new report in The Nation magazine raises questions about Dobbs' own ties to undocumented workers. According to the story, the former CNN anchor hired contractors who employed illegal immigrants to tend to his horse farm and his mansion.

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The Takeaway

Barring of Witness in Ghailani Case a Blow to Gov't

Thursday, October 07, 2010

A federal judge barred the use of a key witness for the government yesterday in the trial of Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani, currently being tried for the bombings of U.S. embassies in Tanzania and Kenya in 1998.

The government acknowledges that the witness, Hussein Abebe, was identified by Ghailani while being interrogated – possibly tortured – in a secret CIA overseas prison, and as such, his testimony would be inadmissible.

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The Takeaway

Medal of Honor Rarely Given in Iraq, Afghanistan

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

On Wednesday, President Obama will present the Medal of Honor to the parents of Staff Sergeant Robbie Miller, killed in action in Afghanistan at the age of 24. Miller is credited with saving the lives of seven American soldiers and fifteen Afghan troops as he charged toward an enemy position, drawing fire away from his comrades. 

Miller is only the third person to receive the Medal of Honor for valor in Afghanistan, and many wonder why that number is so low. 

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The Takeaway

Travel Alert for Americans in Europe

Monday, October 04, 2010

The U.S. State Department issued an alert for Americans heading to Europe yesterday, as intelligence services indicate an increased risk of an attack by al Qaida in western Europe. The threats have been linked to a small cell of terrorists in Pakistan, and are reportedly in response to U.S. drone attacks.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Court's New Term; Jobs Report; Tutu Retires

Monday, October 04, 2010

For the first time in 35 years, the Supreme Court begins a new term without Justice John Paul Stevens. We'll finally get to see the first signs of what kind of justice his replacement, Elena Kagan, will be. Maria Hinojosa, host and managing editor of NPR's weekly radio show, Latino USA, and Charlie Herman, econoics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC Radio, look at the significance of this new term for the Supreme Court.

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The Takeaway

Curating Your 'Class' Photos with Photographer Karen Marshall

Friday, October 01, 2010

All this week, we've talked about class on The Takeaway. And we gave you an assignment: take a photo of something in or around your house that indicates what class you're in. 

You sent us some great photos, which you can see after the jump — and we've asked photographer Karen Marshall to help curate them. Marshall is a documentary photographer. She's on the faculty at the International Center of Photography, where she is a seminar leader in the photojournalism documentary program.

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The Takeaway

Refugees Denied Asylum After Missing Filing Deadlines

Thursday, September 30, 2010

Due to a rule with a filing deadline, many refugees with legitimate claims have been denied political asylum in the U.S. For many of these refugees, getting asylum could be the difference between life and death. 

Over the past 12 years, about 21,000 refugees seeking asylum were denied because of they missed the filing deadline; it is a complicated process that many feel needs immediate changing.

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The Takeaway

Shortage of Lethal Injection Drug Sees Prisons Scrambling

Thursday, September 30, 2010

A major shortage of a drug called sodium thiopental is hampering the ability of states to put inmates to death. The first execution in California in four years was postponed this week, and it's likely not to be the last. Though nine states across the nation have 17 lethal injections scheduled between now and the end of January, it is uncertain whether they will be able to perform the executions due to the shortage.

State prison systems are scrambling to find supplies of sodium thiopental, but they have competition in their search. Over the last few years, the drug has become popular with hospitals, where it is used as an anesthetic for surgery and to induce medial comas. Hospitals had previously used a drug called propofol, though that too has become scarce.

 

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The Takeaway

California Political Rivals Face Off in Debates

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The California governor's race kicked off last night in the first of three debates. Billionaire political novice Meg Whitman, a Republican, faced off against her Democratic rival, former governor and current Attorney General Jerry Brown. 

Bruce Cain, professor of political science at U.C. Berkeley, joins us for some post debate analysis. He'll also preview tonight's debate in California's other closely watched race, the Senate contest between incumbent Barbara Boxer and Republican challenger Carly Fiorina.

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The Takeaway

Administration Wants Ability to Wiretap the Internet

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Federal law enforcement and national security officials are pushing Congress to mandate that all online communications, such as Facebook and Skype, must be technically capable of intercepting and unscrambling encrypted messages if a court issues a wiretap order. 

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The Takeaway

What Does it Mean to be a Middle Class American?

Monday, September 27, 2010

For many years, an integral part of the American dream has involved making it to the middle class. We associate the phrase with steady, secure work, home ownership and providing for a comfortable — if not lavish — lifestyle for our family. But has middle class America fundamentally changed since the Great Recession hit? Do people that once saw themselves as solidly middle class see themselves differently now?

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Peace Talks; Bishop Jones; China and Japan Relations Deteriorate

Monday, September 27, 2010

Israel's partial freeze on settlement buliding in the West Bank ended last night, and Marcus Mabry, associate national editor for The New York Times, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC Radio, discuss how this will affect peace talks between Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.  They'll also take a look at what's ahead this week for Bishop Eddie Long, who has been accused of trying to sexually seduce four teenage boys; President Obama's continued conversations with middle-class Americans; how China and Japan's relationship is rapidly deteriorating, and more.

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The Takeaway

An Interview with Rep. Betsy Markey

Friday, September 24, 2010

Celeste Headlee is in Colorado today, a state where Democrats are struggling to keep their majority in Congress. Among the contested seats is the one belonging to Representative Besty Markey, of Colorado's fourth Congressional district. She's facing an uphill battle against her Republican challenger Cory Gardner, who is trouncing her in the latest polls. 

Representative Markey joins the program to talk about her reelection campaign. Takeaway correspondent Andrea Bernstein also gives us a feel of the political landscape in Colorado right now.

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The Takeaway

Workplace Discrimination against Muslim Americans on the Rise

Friday, September 24, 2010

In 2009, workplace discrimination against Muslims rose 20 percent to a record 803 claims, according to federal data cited in the New York Times.

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