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National Security

PRI's The World

Eric Holder will resign, leaving a mixed legacy on national security issues

Thursday, September 25, 2014

When he joined President Obama's cabinet, Attorney General Eric Holder was expected to oversee the shutdown of the US detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. That never happened, but Holder succeeded in shifting focus back to civilian courts — but also aggressively onto leakers.

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PRI's The World

In France, Ferguson protests stir memories of suburban riots

Friday, August 15, 2014

The death of Michael Brown and the protests in Ferguson have provoked lots of conversation about the militarization of the police in the United States. France has its own history of racial tensions and riots, and the week's events have reminded some French people of tenser times.

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PRI's The World

Why are police using military gear in Ferguson and how did they get it?

Thursday, August 14, 2014

As demonstrations continue in Ferguson, Missouri, after the shooting of teenager Michael Brown, the city's police have brought out military equipment to tamp down the protests, shocking many Americans. The gear most likely came through programs created after 9/11.

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On The Media

This week in national security, unpaid internships in the media, and more

Friday, August 02, 2013

A busy week in the security state from Manning to Snowden, an internet security reporter being harassed by Russian cyber criminals, and a look at unpaid internships in the media.

Gabfest Radio

Gabfest Radio: The NSA Has Your Selfies Edition

Saturday, June 15, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz discuss the oversight of the National Security Agency’s secret intelligence-gathering efforts. Plus, they talk about a New York Times photo tour of Beastie Boy Mike D’s new home in Brooklyn—a piece that incited a rousing email debate within the Slate office.

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The Takeaway

Did We Give The Government Permission to Spy on Us?

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

In the days since Edward Snowden leaked details about the National Security Agency’s data collecting program, we’ve seen editorialists and average Americans expressing outrage over what’s been called a government breach of privacy. But entrepreneur and Silicon Valley insider Steve Blank says we shouldn’t be surprised.

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Gabfest Radio

Gabfest Radio: The Swab My Cheek Edition

Saturday, June 08, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz discuss the new revelations about the National Security Agency’s domestic spying program, and the Supreme Court’s ruling that upholds routine collection of DNA samples from criminal suspects.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Phone Records and Online Data Collection; NJ Senate Appointee; NYC Parks

Friday, June 07, 2013

We follow the news from Washington DC on reports that the government has been collecting online data and the National Security Agency has been collecting Verizon call information. Plus: the news from New Jersey on Governor Christie’s pick for the empty US Senate seat; New York City Parks Commissioner Veronica White on the state of the city’s parks; Todd Abramson of Maxwell’s on the closing of the legendary music venue in Hoboken; and new jobs numbers and what it means for our area.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Coast Check; Hate Crimes; War on Terror; NY Aquarium

Friday, May 24, 2013

WNYC's Janet Babin has been making her way from Cape May to Montauk checking in on the coast before of the Memorial Day weekend. She joins us from the road to report back on the post-Sandy coastline. Plus: Colorlines' Kai Wright discusses the recent hate crimes in New York; a fighter jet pilot discusses modern warfare; analysis of President Obama's speech yesterday about counter-terrorism and national security; and an update from the New York Aquarium.

The Takeaway

National Security and the Muslim World

Thursday, May 23, 2013

As President Obama addresses national security issues, Hussein Rashid of Hofstra University shares his thoughts on how targeted surveillance, drone strikes and other tactics affect our relations with the Muslim world, and with Muslims here at home. 

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The Takeaway

Do Colombians Care About the Secret Service Prostitution Scandal?

Thursday, April 19, 2012

The Secret Service prostitution scandal in Cartagena, Colombia has dominated U.S. headlines and attracted responses from a number of high-profile Americans including the president himself. Obama said last weekend: "If it turns out that some of the allegations made in the press are confirmed, then of course I'll be angry." But what do Colombians think of the whole scandal? Miriam Wells is managing editor with Colombia Reports in Colombia.

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The Takeaway

A Former INS Commissioner on the New ICE Guidelines

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Yesterday, the House Judiciary immigration subcommittee held a meeting called "Holiday on ICE." Contrary to how it might sound, it had nothing to do with dancing elves or figure skating. In this case, ICE refers to Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the federal law enforcement agency under the department of Homeland Security that enforces immigration laws. Here to tell us about detention, past, present and future, is Doris Meissner, who served as Commissioner of the INS under President Clinton and Acting Commissioner under President Reagan. She is currently director of the U.S. Immigration Policy Program at the Migration Policy Institute.

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The Takeaway

Gauging US Military Involvement in Somalia

Thursday, August 11, 2011

The crisis in Somalia continues, with drought and famine plaguing the country and millions of refugees fighting for survival. The U.S. has approved $565 million in humanitarian aid so far this year. But our involvement in Somalia is does not stop there. According to an article in The New York Times yesterday, the U.S. has quietly been stepping up clandestine operations inside Somalia, training Somali intelligence operatives, interrogating suspects, and sending $45 million in arms to African soldiers and private security companies, to fight against the Shabaab, an al-Qaida aligned militant group.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

An Update on the Thomas Drake Case

Thursday, June 09, 2011

Back in May, we spoke to The New Yorker’s Jane Mayer about her article, “The Secret Sharer” as part of our Backstory series. Mayer’s article discussed the case of former National Security Agency executive Thomas Drake who is facing charges of violating the 1917 Espionage Act as part of the Obama Administration's efforts to crack down on national security leaks.

In today’s Washington Post, Ellen Nakashima reports that the government has withdrawn some of the documents that Drake had been accused of leaking to a Baltimore Sun reporter. Legal experts say that this weakens the government's case.

UPDATE: on Friday, June 10, The Wall Street Journal reported that Thomas Drake will plead guilty to the unauthorized use of a government computer, a misdemeanor offense. The government will drop the rest of the charges.

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The Takeaway

The Nuts and Bolts of Bin Laden's Death

Monday, May 02, 2011

How did U.S. forces coordinate Osama Bin Laden's death? Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich explains the nuts and bolts of how this happened, and reports on the reactions in Washington, D.C.

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The Takeaway

America's Moment: Reactions to Bin Laden's Death

Monday, May 02, 2011

Following the news of Osama Bin Laden's death, Celeste Headlee is reporting live from Ground Zero this morning, where family of 9/11 victims and others have gathered to celebrate. Jared Ring, a New York City paramedic supervisor who left Eastern Long Island at 1:30 am to come to Ground Zero, speaks with us. Also, Miranda Nichols, a student from St. Johns University.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: WikiLeaks and Cyber Wars, Morning Headlines

Thursday, December 09, 2010

Are the companies who deny services to WikiLeaks, and the hackers who attack those sites in retaliation, starting a cyber war, and if so, do both sides have a digital ax to grind? 

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The Takeaway

How the US Might Prosecute Julian Assange

Monday, December 06, 2010

We’ve learned a lot more about Julian Assange since he began publishing tens of thousands of classified documents on WikiLeaks last Sunday. Some believe he’s a hero. Others call him dangerous. Neither the U.S. nor Britain has charged Assange with anything, to date. But should Assange be prosecuted for releasing classified information? Is our legal system prepared to deal with what’s become one of the most notorious information-heists of the Internet Age?

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Prosecuting Wikileaks, Morning Headlines

Monday, December 06, 2010

Julian Assange is seeking asylum in Switzerland, while his spokespeople say America should be concentrating on changing the behavior of its diplomats instead of hunting down the Wikileaks founder. 

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The Takeaway

Looking for Julian Assange in England

Thursday, December 02, 2010

British authorities are reportedly aware of Julian Assange's whereabouts in the South of England. But according to British newspaper The Independent, they have yet to act on the international "red notice" from INTERPOL, which alerts countries they are looking for him. Why? We're joined by Mark Hughes, crime correspondent for The Independent, to learn more on the story.   

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