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Nancy Mullane

Life of the Law

Abuse, Abduction and International Law

Monday, September 08, 2014

What happens when one parent takes a child across international borders without the other parent’s permission? In 1980, the United States and international partners created a treaty that lays out the rules for what federal officials are supposed to do ...

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Life of the Law

One Reporter on California’s Death Row

Thursday, July 17, 2014

What do we really know about death row in California? When we don’t know we create, we imagine.

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Life of the Law

The Hardest Time: Moms in Prison

Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Mother’s Day is the one day of the year we set aside to honor mothers. Some do it with flowers and cards. For women who are in prison and their children who are being raised by grandmothers, aunts or guardians on the outside,

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Life of the Law

An Architect’s Code

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

In its code of ethics, the American Institute of Architects requires members to “uphold human rights.” But what does that mean when it comes to prisons—specificially, those that confine inmates largely to their cells with little to do?

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Life of the Law

Full Interview with Justin Helzer

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Justin Helzer died Sunday night, April 14th. He committed suicide inside his cell on San Quentin's Death Row (the cell in this photo). If you look closely you can see him sitting on his bunk, leaning against the door.

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Life of the Law

Reporter on Death Row

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

What do we really know about death row in California? When we don’t know we create, we imagine.

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Life of the Law

Behind the Walls of the Most Restricted Cells

Friday, November 16, 2012

In California, there is one place where people considered to be the most dangerous inmates are incarcerated, it's called the Security Housing Unit at Pelican Bay State Prison. Life of the Law Executive Producer, Nancy Mullane,

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Life of the Law

Jailhouse Lawyers

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

In California, there are hundreds if not thousands of people practicing criminal law though they’ve never passed a bar exam. They don’t wear suits. They don’t have secretaries. And they can’t bill for their time. They’re called Jailhouse Lawyers.

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