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From The Takeaway: DJ Spooky and Civil Rights Unbound

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

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Throughout the last century, the struggle of the civil rights movement has been documented in photos, speeches, poems and paintings. Paul Miller, a.k.a. DJ Spooky, mixed clips from the long history of the civil rights movement and created ...

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The Takeaway

DJ Spooky: Civil Rights Unbound

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

Throughout the last century, the struggle of the civil rights movement has been documented in photos, speeches, poems and paintings. Paul Miller, a.k.a. DJ Spooky, mixed clips from the long history of the civil rights movement and created a digital media collage that was commissioned specifically for the NAACP’s centennial. It's called, "Winds of Change: A Composition and Homage to the NAACP on 100 Years of Change." The Takeaway talks to DJ Spooky about his work.

 

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WNYC News

NAACP: Young at Heart?

Monday, July 13, 2009

As the NAACP centennial celebration gets underway in midtown, Brian Lehrer speaks with Tricia Rose, professor of Africana Studies at Brown University, about the NAACP's relevance to the "hip hop generation." Rose is the author of The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk About When We Talk About Hip Hop-And ...

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The Takeaway

Marking the NAACPs Centennial Convention

Monday, July 13, 2009

The NAACP has gathered in New York for a six-day convention celebrating its 100-year anniversary. It’s an enormous affair with giants such as Cornel West, Reverend Jesse Jackson, and President Obama paying tribute to the accomplishments of the civil rights organization. The civil rights group was formed by a multi-racial coalition in 1909, sparked in 1908 by a deadly race riot in Springfield Illinois. Nearly a century later, Barack Obama launched his presidential campaign not far from where the riot took place. Looking at the challenges ahead and its past accomplishments we are joined by Melissa Harris-Lacewell. She is an Associate Professor of Politics and African American Studies at Princeton University.

Read about what was life was like for black Americans in 1909.

"Every civil rights organization ultimately wants to die. Because the goal is to have full equality. And if you have full equality then your institutional purpose is no longer important."
—Melissa Harris Lacewell on the anniversary of the NAACP

The Takeaway will be covering the convention all week long. Tomorrow we continue the conversation with the artists' take on the NAACP’s legacy. We’ll be joined by musical sensation DJ Spooky and poet Elizabeth Alexander.

 

 

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The Takeaway

[Web Special] NAACP Centennial: What the World Looked Like in 1909

Monday, July 13, 2009

"Whites and Blacks Confer as Equals"—that was a headline on page 2 of The New York Times on June 1, 1909, about "a conference to consider the uplifting of the negro."

It wasn't even called the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People yet; the first appearance of the phrase in the Times didn't come until the following year, in a one-paragraph article noting that "Dr. W. E. B. Du Bois, the well-known negro man of letters," had been appointed the new organization's director of research and publicity. (With almost certainly unintended irony, the paragraph was tacked on at the end of a three-column review of a book in praise of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.) The idea for the conference had been hatched that January in New York, at a private meeting in which a dwindling remnant of upper-caste abolitionists joined forces with progressive journalists and social workers. The announcement of the conference went out on February 12 over the name of William English Walling, a Kentucky-born journalist and social activist. It was the hundredth anniversary of the birth of another son of Kentucky, Abraham Lincoln. ... (continue reading)

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WNYC News

Marking the NAACPs Centennial Convention

Sunday, July 12, 2009

The NAACP has gathered in New York for a six-day convention celebrating its 100-year anniversary. It’s an enormous affair with giants such as Cornel West, Reverend Jesse Jackson, and President Obama paying tribute to the accomplishments of the civil rights organization.
More from The Takeaway

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WNYC News

NAACP Centennial: What the World Looked Like in 1909

Sunday, July 12, 2009

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From The Takeaway

In The New York Times from June 1, 1909, the headline on page 2 read :'Whites and Blacks Confer as Equals,' referencing 'a conference to consider the uplifting of the negro.'

It wasn't even called ...

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WNYC News

Hazel Dukes on the NAACP: Past and Future

Friday, July 10, 2009

dukes

Hazel Dukes, President of the NAACP New York State Conference, discusses the one hundredth anniversary of the NAACP, the organization’s history and future on the Leonard Lopate Show.

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WNYC News

Marian Anderson and the Civil Rights Movement

Thursday, July 09, 2009

Bernstein rehearsing with singer Marian Anderson at Lewisohn Stadium, New York. June 1947. (Music Division)

Bernstein rehearsing with singer Marian Anderson at Lewisohn Stadium, New York. June 1947. (Music Division)

This year marks the 70th anniversary of Marian Anderson's historic performance on the ...

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WNYC News

NAACP Slideshow

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Pictures of important members and events that celebrate the NAACP's centennial.
Thanks to the NAACP for help in sourcing photographs.

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WNYC News

Today in History: W. E. B. Du Bois

Monday, February 23, 2009

Du Bois

Today is the birthday of W. E. B. Du Bois who was born February 23, 1868 and died August 27, 1963. Du Bois was an activist, author, intellectual and co-founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). He wrote many books, including The Souls of Black Folk (1903).

Below is an excerpt of a lecture, 'Socialism and the American Negro' delivered by Du Bois, to an audience in Great Hall, Madison Wisconsin Memorial Union, in 1960.

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