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Muslim

The Takeaway

Robin Wright on 'Rock the Casbah'

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Historically speaking, when we think of revolutions we think of youth. And in the case of the Arab spring, this is certainly true — one half of the Islamic world is people under thirty, and they are at the forefront of sweeping change. How are their values and religious beliefs similar to (and different from) their elders? And what do they want the future to look like?

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The Takeaway

A Ramadan Roadtrip Around The US

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Two men are spending Ramadan in 30 different mosques in 30 different states for all 30 days of the month of fasting. They're traveling 13,000 miles, from Alaska to New York City, and are speaking with us today from South Carolina, where they're a little more than halfway through their trip. What they've found is that generations of American Muslims have lived in small pockets of the U.S. since the 1800s.

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On Being

Richard Mouw — Restoring Political Civility: An Evangelical View [remix]

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Richard Mouw challenges his fellow conservative Christians to civility in public discourse. He offers historical as well as spiritual perspective on American Evangelicals' navigation of disagreement, fear, and truth.

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On Being

[Unedited] Richard Mouw with Krista Tippett (Restoring Political Civility)

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Richard Mouw challenges his fellow conservative Christians to civility in public discourse. He offers historical as well as spiritual perspective on American Evangelicals' navigation of disagreement, fear, and truth.

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Features

Manhattan Children's Museum Gets Funding for 'Muslim Worlds' Exhibit

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Kids will get a hands-on look at mosaics, literature, calligraphy and other pieces of the "Muslim World" thanks to a $40,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities that went to the Children's Museum of Manhattan.

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The Takeaway

Understanding Muslim-American Identity 10 Years After 9/11

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

As the tenth anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks approaches, a new Gallup poll raises the issue of how Muslim-Americans view our democracy and their place in it. The poll surveyed Muslim-Americans and other faith groups, asking whether Muslims have been discriminated against recently, if Muslim-Americans have been sympathetic to al-Qaida, and how loyal they are to the democratic system. In contrast to Americans of other faiths, 78 percent of Muslim-Americans said military attacks on civilians are never justified.

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The Takeaway

'The 99': Superheroes and Comics in the Islamic World

Monday, August 01, 2011

When times are tough, Americans often turn to comic books. The so-called Golden Age of Comics in the U.S. began with the Great Depression, when out-of-work Americans were desperate for superheroes and role models. Our appetite for Superman and the Green Lantern only grew as Hitler marched across Europe. And Americans aren’t the only ones who need superheroes in difficult times. Our guest for this segment is the author of "The 99," a comic book series published in Kuwait and translated into nine languages. "The 99" follows Islam-inspired superheroes as they fight evil dictators and extremists.

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The Takeaway

Did Anti-Muslim Extremists in the US Influence Anders Breivik?

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Anders Behring Breivik, the Norwegian charged with carrying out a mass killing last week in his home country, told his lawyer he was saving Norway from Muslim domination. Breivik is an anti-Muslim extremist, and it has become clear that he was heavily influenced by American bloggers, who share his fears about the threat of Muslim immigrants on Western culture.

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The Takeaway

Do US Counter-Terrorism Efforts Focus Too Much On Muslims?

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

When the bombing and shooting first broke out in Norway last Friday, no one knew the source of the attacks, but a small group of anti-Islamic bloggers in the U.S. were quick to blame Muslim extremists. In the end, a manifesto that Anders Behring Breivik — the man accused of carrying out the killing spree — posted online confirmed that he was not Muslim, but the opposite: an anti-Muslim extremist.

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The Takeaway

9/11 Hate-Crime Victim Fights Execution of His Attacker

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Ten days after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Rais Bhuiyan, a Muslim from Bangladesh, was working behind the counter at a gas station convenience store in Texas when a man with a gun entered. The gunman, Mark Stroman, shot Bhuiyan in the face, seeking what he later called revenge for the 9/11 attacks. Bhuiyan survived, but two others that Stroman also targeted because they appeared to be Muslim, did not.

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On Being

Amahl Bishara and Nidal Al-Azraq — Pleasure More Than Hope [remix]

Thursday, July 07, 2011

Did you know that the sacred city of Bethlehem lies within the West Bank? And, inside its borders, you'll find something unexpected — a close-knit neighborhood where generations of people have created a new life for themselves. Amahl Bishara and Nidal Al-

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On Being

[Unedited] Amahl Bishara with Krista Tippett

Thursday, July 07, 2011

Did you know that the sacred city of Bethlehem lies within the West Bank? And, inside its borders, you'll find something unexpected — a close-knit neighborhood where generations of people have created a new life for themselves. Amahl Bishara and Nidal Al-

Comment

On Being

[Unedited] Nidal Al-Azraq with Krista Tippett

Thursday, July 07, 2011

Did you know that the sacred city of Bethlehem lies within the West Bank? And, inside its borders, you'll find something unexpected — a close-knit neighborhood where generations of people have created a new life for themselves. Amahl Bishara and Nidal Al-

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The Takeaway

Google Ideas Gathers Former Extremists to Target Radicalization

Monday, June 27, 2011

Google's eight-month-old think tank, Google Ideas, is paying for 80 former Muslim extremists, neo-Nazis, U.S. gang members, and other former radicals to gather in Dublin today, to discuss what draws people to violent extremism and how technology can carry out de-radicalization efforts. Google is calling the group "formers," and they'll be participating in the talks with 120 activists and business leaders. 

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WNYC News

Imams, Anarchists and B-Boys: New School Docs Festival

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

"Truth Be Told," the New School's annual assortment of student documentaries, presents a two-fold task for its organizers: examining the bounty of the city (and beyond) while hoping to create calling cards for aspiring filmmakers.

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WNYC News

Use of Informants in Terror Cases May Create Entrapment, NYU Report Claims

Monday, May 23, 2011

The use of informants in high-profile terror cases constitutes a form of entrapment that targets Muslim Americans, a new report issued by New York University's School of Law charges.

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The Takeaway

Maryam Jameela: An Unlikely Jihadist

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

When we think of Jihadists, we tend to think of people like Faisal Shahzad, who attempted to bomb Times Square last spring. But it so happens that one of the most famous Jihadist thinkers is a 76-year-old white woman from Westchester, New York named Maryam Jameela. Born to a non-observant Jewish family, she converted to Islam in her twenties, emigrated to Pakistan, and became a prominent female voice for conservative Islam, writing over thirty books on the subject. 

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The Takeaway

Sectarian Tensions Flare in Egypt

Monday, May 09, 2011

12 people died and hundreds were injured in sectarian clashes yesterday in Cairo. The violence was the result of longstanding tensions between Muslims and Coptic Christians in Egypt. Those tensions were softened in the immediate aftermath of the ouster of Hosni Mubarak in February. David Kirkpatrick, Foreign Correspondent for The New York Times, says the violence has slowly crept back into the lives of residents in Cairo.

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The Takeaway

Muslim Religious Leader on Bin Laden's Death

Tuesday, May 03, 2011

In the wake of the September 11th attacks, America's relationship to Muslims at home and abroad changed. A new climate of fear and suspicion was born, though in some cases so were attempts at greater understanding between members of different faiths. For a look at how the death of Osama Bin Laden might affect the relationship between Muslims and members of other faiths in the US, we turn to Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, founder of the Cordoba Initiative, a multi-faith organization which works to build trust among people of different faiths and cultures.

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WNYC News

Witnesses at State Homeland Security Hearing Called Anti-Muslim

Thursday, April 07, 2011

A month after Rep. Peter King's congressional hearing on the threat of radicalization among Muslims, a New York state legislator is set to conduct his own related, and controversial hearing. State Senator Gregory Ball of Putnam County will chair the Homeland Security hearing, set to examine terrorism and threats to sensitive sites such as the Indian Point nuclear power plant.

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