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Mubarak

The Brian Lehrer Show

Update on Egypt

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Joshua Keating, associate editor of Foreign Policy magazine, and Omar Cheta, PhD candidate in the department of Middle Eastern and Islamic studies at NYU, update us on the situation in Egypt, the status of President Mubarak, and how he and his fellow Egyptians are feeling about recent developments.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Mubarak Before the Protests

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Yesterday New Yorker staff writer Lawrence Wright discussed his new article on Scientology. But when he was at the studios, he also discussed his past reporting on the roots of Al-Qaeda and the connection to Egyptian prisons and abuses under the Mubarak regime. Then, Joe Stork, deputy director of Human Rights Watch's Middle East and North Africa division joins us from Cairo and provides a history of oppression and abuse under the Mubarak regime.

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It's A Free Country ®

Twitter Responses To Military Announcement

Thursday, February 10, 2011

BREAKING—Egyptian military commanders told protesters in Tahrir Square that all their demands would be met today, but they were not. On twitter, the day started off with joyous pronouncements that the revolution had succeeded, followed by remarks of uncertainty, and now we're seeing anger, disappointment and promises to march to the palace in Cairo tomorrow.

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WNYC News

Mubarak Transfers Some Power to Vice President But Won't Step Down

Thursday, February 10, 2011

President Hosni Mubarak said he transferred some power to his vice president but refused to step down Thursday as tens of thousands of protesters calling for his resignation gathered in Cairo to hear the nationally televised address.

Live Egypt Coverage: Special Broadcast from the BBC World Service

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rising Food Prices and Egypt's Uprising

Thursday, February 03, 2011

“In looking at Egypt, for example, the protesters are focusing on getting Mubarak out of office, but the food issue hangs over Egypt because they import such a large amount of their grain. In fact, I think Egypt is currently the world’s leading wheat importer, having surpassed Japan and Brazil which are the other big 3 wheat importers. But what happened with Egypt was that a year or so ago, they signed…a 5-year contract with Russia to supply the Egyptians with 3 million tons of wheat a year, and the ink was hardly dry on that contract before the Russians were announcing  that they were embargoing all grain exports. And so suddenly Egypt had to scramble to replace what they were expecting to get from the Russians.

-Lester Brown, president of the Earth Policy Institute and author of World on the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse. You can hear the entire interview here.

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The Takeaway

As Egypt Changes, Obama Stumbles

Thursday, February 03, 2011

After all of the events that have rocked Egypt over the last ten days, January 25 seems like ancient history. But it was just last Tuesday when Egyptians took to the streets to demand their autocratic leader of over 30 years relinquish his power. It was also last Tuesday when Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pronounced Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's government "stable," saying it was "looking for ways to respond to legitimate needs and interests of the Egyptian people." 

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The Takeaway

Violence Erupts in Egyptian Protests

Thursday, February 03, 2011

After days of relatively peaceful demonstrations, a new voice has emerged in the Egypt as pro-Mubarak supporters took to the streets of Cairo yesterday. With Mubarak's supporters came the introduction of rocks, clubs, stones, knives and Molotov cocktails. The attacks did not come from the military, the disputes occurred between the two rivaling sides.

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The Takeaway

Egypt's Role in Extraordinary Rendition

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Egypt has long been a crucial ally to America's program of extraordinary rendtion — the practice of sending terror suspects to other countries for interrogation. When Egypt's President Mubarak dissolved his cabinet last week, he appointed Omar Suleiman as his new vice president. Suleiman is already well known in the United States, specifically as the C.I.A.'s key Egyptian contact for extraordinary rendition.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Egypt's Future

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Aladdin Elaasar, nominated as a candidate for the presidential elections in Egypt in 2005, and the author of The Last Pharaoh: Mubarak and the Uncertain Future of Egypt in the Obama Age, discusses his critique of the Mubarak regime in Egypt and what he thinks about the future of that country.

Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

The Leonard Lopate Show

Egypt on the Brink

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

On Wednesday, as events continued to unfold across Egypt, Leonard spoke to Tarek Osman about what’s happened in Egypt over the last 55 years, since the rise of Gamal Abdul Nasser.

While Osman, the author of Egypt on the Brink: From Nasser to Mubarak, saw the roots of today’s events as going all the way back to Napoleon, he described great changes in the last 60 years:  

"If you look at 1950, the midpoint of the 20th Century at Egypt and try to speculate how this country would look 50 or 60 years down the line…most speculators, most strategic thinkers would have imagined an Egypt that is very different from Egypt today. Today, Egypt is very conservative; at that time it was very liberal. At that time, in the 50’s, it was very nationalist. Today it’s very sectarian oriented. It was very cosmopolitan. Today it’s not cosmopolitan. At that time, Egypt was a worldly city – even in terms of social glamor. Today, it’s certainly far from that.”

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The Takeaway

In History, a Template for Egypt's Future?

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

As night falls on the ninth day of the people's revolt in Egypt, the country's future isn't the only thing that is uncertain. It has yet to be seen whether Egypt is in the midst of a true revolution, or more of a coup d'etat. From Iran to Algeria, history provides a number of models that may be clues to what an Egypt without Hosni Mubarak could look like.

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The Takeaway

Egypt: A Need for Reconciliation?

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

While rejecting calls for his immediate ouster, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak agreed not to seek reelection in the planned September elections. A new government is all but guaranteed in the region, but will the country's transition to Democracy be peaceful? Columnist for the The New York Times, Nicholas Kristof, reports from Tahrir Square, where he saw aggressive pro-Mubarak demonstrators and says he is concerned that there may be clashes between them and pro-Democracy demonstrators.

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The Takeaway

What's Next for the Egyptian Government?

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

"Mubarak is not a one-man show," says Anwar Sadat professor for peace and development at the University of Maryland, Shibley Telhami. He explains that there is large priveleged class in Egypt that benefits from the status-quo and is not going to be eager to see the change in leadership. He also takes a closer look at what will happen now that Mubarak has pledged not to run again and the constitutional changes that will need to take place in order to ensure a new democratic process.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Update from Cairo on Day of Protest

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Today, just hours before Hosni Mubarak’s announcement this evening that he would not seek another term as President, Leonard spoke with New York Times reporter Kareem Fahim in Cairo. There have been a number of developments in the last 48 hours, from the Finance Ministry saying that people out of work because of the demonstrations would be eligible for unemployment benefits, to the military’s announcement last night that it would not use force against demonstrators. The latter, according to Fahim, opened the door for today’s massive protest in Tahrir Square, which some news organizations say was attended by over a million people. (As a side note the Iranian government has said it supports the protesters; which is only a little ironic.)

Fahim told us that “The range of responses [from the Mubarak regime] is very hard to read or understand at this point. There are a number of new actors in the government and it’s not clear if everyone is acting under the President’s direction or if some of the people under him are trying to ease his path from power.” Mr. Mubarak took a step down that path this afternoon, but in his speech maintained that he will “die on [Egyptian] soil.”

Nobel Laureate Mohamed ElBaradei is known in this country mostly as a foil to the Bush Administration during his time as head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, but he is now the most prominent (and media friendly) opposition leader in Egypt. Fahim said that while ElBaradei has “name recognition in the country. I don’t think he has any base of support yet, although there is a large activist community, especially in Cairo that’s enthusiastic about him. But I think he’s an unknown quality to a lot of people and he ended up speaking for the opposition for the moment probably because he represents sort of a consensus figure and maybe a figure who might be seen as more palatable to whatever outside powers are involved in these discussions at this point.” The American Ambassador and recently appointed Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman spoke with ElBaradei today.

Several of the other producers on the show and I have been watching Al-Jazeera’s English feed online for the past couple days (You can watch it here). The network remains off the air in Egypt and Fahim mentioned that state-run television has been painting a very different picture about what is happening in the country. The Internet also remains shut down, but according to Fahim some activists saw that as a boon to the movement, saying “I spoke to several Internet generation activists…and they said once they had to leave their computers alone, once they were off Facebook, once they were off Twitter, there was nothing left to do but go to the streets. And that’s what they did. They sort of credit the decision to cut off the Internet with enlarging the size of the crowds."

The Lopate Show will continue to cover events in Egypt this week. 

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