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Mubarak

The Brian Lehrer Show

Egypt Two Years After Mubarak's Ouster

Monday, February 11, 2013

Joshua Stacher, Egypt expert at the Wilson Center assistant professor of Political Science at Kent State and the author of Adaptable Autocrats: Regime Power in Egypt and Syria, discusses the situation in Egypt two years after the fall of Mubarak.

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The New Yorker: Political Scene

Peter Hessler and Wendell Steavenson discuss the political chaos in Egypt.

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Peter Hessler and Wendell Steavenson discuss the political chaos in Egypt.

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The Takeaway

Mubarak "Clinically Dead"

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Back in February 2011, when Egyptians were protesting daily in Tahrir Square, we spoke with Omar Khalifa, a resident of Cairo and the director of O Media. He was skeptical about the revolution and felt the people of his country were rushing into something they weren’t prepared for. We check back in with Khalifa after Egyptian media yesterday reported that former president Hosni Mubarak suffered a stroke Tuesday and is "clinically dead."

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The Takeaway

Egyptian Parliament Dissolved On the Eve of Elections

Friday, June 15, 2012

Sixteen months after President Hosni Mubarak was ousted, Cairo continues to be at the epicenter of democratic turmoil. On the brink of the second round of presidential elections this weekend, Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court has dissolved the Parliament. The act makes relations between the Supreme Constitutional Court and the Muslim Brotherhood seem increasingly fraught.

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The Takeaway

Fifth Day of Violent Clashes in Tahrir Square

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Egyptian security forces attempted to clear protesters from Cairo's Tahrir Square in a predawn raid on Tuesday — the second in as many days — as clashes between demonstrators and police entered their fifth day. Thirteen people have been killed in the protests since the second round of parliamentary elections began on Friday. On Sunday, the United Nations and the U.S. State Department condemned the violence. Gen. Adel Emara of Egypt's ruling military council denied using violence against the protesters on Monday.

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The Takeaway

Arab World Watches as Mubarak Stands Trial

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Crowds gathered this morning outside the police academy in Cairo where former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak appeared before a court to face charges of corruption and ordering the killing of protestors during the revolts that took place earlier this year. Mubarak, who had not been seen in public since he was deposed in February, pleaded not guilty. The trial carries a great deal of significance in the Arab world, as Mubarak is the first modern Arab ruler to be tried in public by his own people following a revolution, and could face the death penalty if convicted.

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The Takeaway

Hosni Mubarak Trial Begins in Egypt

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak arrived by helicopter this morning at makeshift Cairo court built specifically for trying him on charges of corruption and ordering the deaths of 800 protesters. Mubarak, who ruled Egypt for nearly 30 years before stepping down after 18 days of protests, pleaded not guilty. The 83-year-old, who has been ill, was wheeled into a cage to face trial with his two sons and other defendants.

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The Takeaway

Hosni Mubarak Under Investigation, In Hospital

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Hosni Mubarak is being questioned for financial crimes, however he has recently been admitted to the hospital for poor health. Medical sources say that the 82-year-old refused to eat or drink before he was questioned. His two sons are also being held in custody for fifteen days of questioning. The pressure is on the general prosecutor to show that Mubarak is not exempt from justice. The BBC's Middle East correspondent Yolande Knell reports.

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The Takeaway

Mubarak Claims Innocence as Egyptians Protest

Monday, April 11, 2011

Protesters gathered Cairo's Tahrir Square once again on Saturday to demand that the Egyptian military open an investigation into former president Hosni Mubarak's abuses. Mubarak responded to charges of corruption in a radio address on Sunday, the first time he's addressed the country since being forced from power in February. How have Egyptians responded to Mubarak's claims of innocence? What does this mean for the future of Egypt?

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The Takeaway

Can Egypt Recoup Mubarak's Fortune?

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Dictators and Dough: Where does all the money go – and is there any way of getting it back? Coming up on The Takeaway, tax haven expert Nicholas Shaxson explains whether Egypt has any chance of putting its hands on Hosni Mubarak’s assets.

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The Takeaway

Egypt: Traces of Mubarak

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Where is Hosni Mubarak? That question remains the subject of much speculation. Some reports suggests that he is at his villa in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh and others think he has sought medical treatment abroad. But in the meantime, people are still responding to the sudden absence of the dictator. BBC correspondent, Paul Adams visited the birth town of Hosni Mubarak, Kafr el-Meselha in the Nile Delta, where locals are conflicted about the new Egypt.

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The Takeaway

Wave of Change: Dawn of a New Egypt as Mubarak Steps Down

Friday, February 11, 2011

This is the ninth and final edition of Wave of Change, a special podcast from The Takeaway, covering the mass protests in Egypt and the consequences for the wider Arab world, hosted by John Hockenberry with Celeste Headlee.

Egypt's three-week-long anti-government revolt reached a happy denouement today when Hosni Mubarak, the country's autocratic leader of nearly thirty years, stepped down, ceding power to the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces. In today's Wave of Change, we bring you a medley of jubilant voices from Cairo, where after 18 days of protest, people power won over the forces of an oppressive regime.

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It's A Free Blog

Egypt — What Happens Now?

Friday, February 11, 2011

I have been watching the events in Egypt over these 18 days and it was clear that the country had risen together for a single cause — the removal of President Hosni Mubarak. But as I have suggested before, a revolution does not a democracy make.

There can be no orderly transition of government in Egypt in the midst of chaos. The protestors have made their point. They have won the day: Murbarak has resigned.

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The Takeaway

Mubarak Defies Calls for Ouster

Friday, February 11, 2011

A massive crowd has filled the streets of Cairo on day 18 of Egypt's uprising. Thursday night, President Hosni Mubarak announced that he has no intentions of leaving office sparking rage among the crowds of demonstrators. For an analysis of what happens now is Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said professor of Modern Arab Studies at Columbia University, author of “Sowing Crisis: The Cold War and American Dominance in the Middle East” and “Palestinian Identity.”

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The Takeaway

A Younger Generation Speaks to Power

Friday, February 11, 2011

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak addressed the youth of his country — most of whom are the very people calling for his removal from office — with what many perceive as paternal condescension. We take a closer look at the generation gap between the President and his populace.

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The Takeaway

What's Next for US Foreign Policy as Mubarak Stays On?

Friday, February 11, 2011

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak continues to hold power in Egypt after his announcement that he would not cede to demonstrators demands that he step down. Instead he decided to hand day-to-day powers to Vice President Omar Suleiman and made vague promises about the Egyptian Constitution.

President Obama watched Mubarak's speech on Air Force One, while returning from a trip to Michigan and seemed to be somewhat caught of guard. What role will the United States take now? A cautious one, says The New York Times, David Sanger.

 

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It's A Free Country ®

Mubarak Refuses to Resign, Suleiman Tells Youth To Go Home, Crowd in Tahrir Is Upset

Thursday, February 10, 2011

President Hosni Mubarak told the Egyptian people on state TV that he will remain in Egypt until his death and will not step down until there are free elections in September. He announced that he had transfered some powers to the Vice President, and will amend the consititution in preparation for a repeal of the hated emergency law that allows the arrest of anyone who is in opposition to the government—but left it vague when that would take place.

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It's A Free Country ®

The US Response To Egypt: Supporting 'Transition'

Thursday, February 10, 2011

WNYC

Speaking to students at Northern Michigan University, President Obama called the events unfolding in Egypt a "moment of transformation." The administration has been very careful with its words about Mubarak, so Obama appears to be riding the wave, not driving the wave.

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WNYC News

Look | In Little Egypt, Queens Residents Flood the Streets

Thursday, February 10, 2011

PHOTOS. New Yorkers living in Little Egypt, a community in Astoria, Queens, kept a close watch on Egypt as events unfolded in Cairo.

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It's A Free Country ®

Protest Context: The History of Mubarak Abuses

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Torture actually spread, it became sort of an epidemic, which is what it is today, I'm sorry to say. It happens in police stations, it happens not just with political dissidents, it happens with people just picked up for suspicion of committing ordinary crimes. This has become a serious and widespread problem.

Joe Stork deputy director of Human Rights Watch's Middle East and North Africa division, on The Brian Lehrer Show

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