Streams

 

 

Moammar Gadhafi

It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Did Obama Lose Interest in the Arab Spring?

Monday, September 17, 2012

Serious questions remain as to whether, after the overthrow of dictatorships, the U.S. failed to aggressively follow-up to help in the building of civil, security, economic, and political institutions in these countries.

Read More

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

American Former POW and Libyan Resistance Fighter on Saturday's National Election

Monday, July 09, 2012

Over the weekend Libyans voted in the first free national elections since the demise of dictator Colonel Moammar Gaddafi. During all the changes and turmoil in Libya last year, there's one guest we interviewed a number of times on the show: Matthew VanDyke. Last year, VanDyke was captured by Gaddafi loyalists in Libya and held in solitary confinement for about six months before he escaped. VanDyke eventually came home, but he never lost his love for Libya or the Libyan people.

Comment

The Takeaway

After Fleeing, A Woman Returns to a New Libya

Friday, December 30, 2011

Iman Traina escaped from Libya in April, fleeing on a boat  with her baby as Moammar Gadhafi's forces moved on Misrata. When she was last on the program, she reported not having clean water, lack of food and electricity. After spending many months in Ireland, she is home again. Traina says things have gotten much better in Libya and looks and hopes to settle down, raise her children, and rebuild her country.

Comment

The Takeaway

The Untold Civilian Causalities of NATO's Libya Intervention

Monday, December 19, 2011

The seven month NATO operation that helped rebels in Libya drive Col. Moammar Gadhafi from power has been heralded as a model air war that utilized technology to deliver blunt force while minimizing civilian causalities. But according to an investigation by The New York Times, dozens of Libyan civilians were killed by NATO airstrikes during the operation, which ended on October 31. The Times estimates that between 40 and 70 people, including at least 29 women and children, were killed by NATO.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Who Gets to Keep Saadi Gadhafi's $16 Million House in London?

Monday, December 19, 2011

A $16 million house on London's "Millionaire Row" could be the first Gadhafi family asset in the UK to be returned to the Libyan government. The luxury property with more than a half-dozen bedrooms and an indoor swimming pool is currently occupied by a group of squatters from an organization called Topple the Tyrants, but attorneys have discovered that it is actually belongs to Saadi Gadhafi, a son of former dictator Moammar Gadhafi. 

Comment

The Takeaway

As Libya Fell, Americans Attempted to Profit Off Gadhafi

Friday, November 18, 2011

Confidential documents found in Libyan government offices show a group of Americans tried to assist Col. Moammar Gadhafi and his family flee the country for at least $10 million. The group, which called themselves the "American Action Group," also offered Gadhafi lobbying services to sway the U.S. government to support his regime after NATO became its bombing campaign. Made up of a former CIA officer, a Kansas City lawyer, a GOP operative, and a terrorism expert, the group claims their goal was to avoid a Libyan civil war, not to help Gadhafi. Scott Shane broke the news for The New York Times. He discusses the details of the story.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

American POW Turned Libyan Resistance Fighter Matthew VanDyke Tells His Story

Monday, November 07, 2011

In August, The Takeaway first spoke with Matthew VanDyke and his mother Sharon. VanDyke, an American who described himself as a journalist, was captured by loyalists to Moammar Gadhafi in Brega, and held in solitary confinement for six months, before escaping on August 24. He finally escaped captivity in August, but has stayed on in Libya out of a sense of loyalty to the other men he was imprisoned with, joining the NTC fighters. Over the weekend, VanDyke returned home after eight months.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

Gadhafi's Penpal: A Jewish Florist from Brooklyn

Friday, November 04, 2011

A number of peculiar stories have emerged since the demise of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi. There was the story about his crush on former Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice, which she has called "weird and a bit creepy." Rice may not have liked Gadhafi's attention, but Louis Schlamowitz, an 81-year-old Jewish florist from Brooklyn, was happy to have corresponded with him for a number of years. A hobby collector of over 6,000 autographs, Schlamowitz first wrote to Gadhafi in the late 1960s and continued to receive letters from the dictator for forty years.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Gadhafi Buried in Secret Location at Dawn

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Libyan officials confirmed on Tuesday that the body of Col. Moammar Gadhafi, his son Muatassim, and former Defense Minister Abu Bakr Younis were buried at dawn in a secret location. Questions over how and when to dispose of the former dictator's body created a challenge for Libya's transitional government. Islamic law dictates that burial should happen within a day after death, but Libya's National Transitional Council took several days to decided how to act. Katya Adler, correspondent for the BBC, reports on the latest from Tripoli.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Libyan Student Stuck in Diplomatic Limbo

Friday, October 21, 2011

Reactions to the death of Moammar Gadhafi continue to pour in from Libya and across the U.S. Mohamed Gibril is a student at Michigan State University. He and other Libyan students were sent to the U.S. to study under a Libyan government program for diplomatic training before the uprising against the Gadhafi regime. Since then his visa has run out and he's been unable to return safely. He and his fellow students are currently in limbo due to the turmoil in their country. Assia Bashir Amry is the daughter of exiled Libyan revolutionary ElHajj Sabr, a revolutionary who did not live to see Gadhafi's ouster. She talks about what feelings Gadhafi's death has brought up for her.

Comment

The Takeaway

Libya Celebrates Gadhafi's Death; World Asks Questions About His Demise

Friday, October 21, 2011

In the 24 hours since the world have gotten news of Col. Moammar Gadhafi's death, the streets of Libya have been overwhelmed with celebrations. As joyous Libyans express their relief that Gadhafi's brutal reign has finally come to an end, international observers are raising questions over the way the dictator died. Graphic photographs of Gadhafi's corpse and a mobile phone video of what appears to be his final moments have lead the Human Rights commissioner at the United Nations to call for an investigation into his death.

Comment

The Takeaway

Matthew VanDyke: An American Fighter in Post-Gadhafi Libya

Friday, October 21, 2011

Matthew VanDyke is an American who traveled to Libya when the war broke out. He planned to travel, write, and help friends in the area. But his plan went terribly wrong in March when he was captured by Gadhafi loyalists and held in solitary confinement for six months. He finally escaped captivity in August, but has stayed on in Libya out of a sense of loyalty to the other men he was imprisoned with, apparently joining the NTC fighters. Matthew's mother Sharon VanDyke talks about what the future holds for her son, now that Moammar Gadhafi has been killed.

Comment

The Takeaway

Libyan-American Rapper Khaled M. Reacts to Gadhafi's Death

Friday, October 21, 2011

Libyan-Americans are celebrating the death of former dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Khaled M. is a 26-year-old Libyan-American rapper from Chicago. In his own way Khaled has followed in his parents footsteps. They spent most of their lives fighting the Gadhafi regime through community organizing and student activism. His father, Mohamed Ahmed, was a political prisoner from 1972 to 1977 after leading student groups against Gadhafi.

Comment

The Takeaway

Moammar Gadhafi Reportedly Captured in Sirte

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Col. Moammar Gadhafi was Sirte this morning, and later killed from a gunshot to the head sustained during a gunfight between rebels and loyalists. Adbel Majid of Libya's National Transitional Council was quoted by Reuters as saying Gadhafi was wounded in both legs and was carried away by an ambulance. Earlier in the morning, NTC fighters seized Sirte, the last city loyal to Gadhafi. Gadhafi has been in hiding since Tripoli fell to rebel fighters on August 21. Bani Walid, the other remaining Gadhafi stronghold, was taken by NTC forces on Monday.

Comment

The Takeaway

Nicholas Kristof on the Reported Death of Gadhafi

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Unconfirmed reports out of Libya this morning say Col. Moammar Gadhafi has died of injuries he sustained when he was captured in his birthplace of Sirte earlier in the day. Celebrations are breaking out all over the country, as jubilant Libyans rejoice over the dawn of a new country, and the alleged death of a brutal leader. Gadhafi was hated by many Libyans, says New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, who has followed Libya for many years. Kristof looks back at the four decades of Gadhafi's rule.

Comment

The Takeaway

The Apparent Final Chapter of the Gadhafi Story

Thursday, October 20, 2011

"I will confirm that Gadhafi is dead and also his second man in the army, Abu Bakr Younus Jabr," Abdullah Kenshil, a spokesman for Libya's National Transitional Council, told The Takeaway. "This is definitely confirmed by our commander and our miltary council in Tripoli, so he is killed." Gadhafi was killed this morning in his birthplace of Sirte as forces of the NTC swept the city. His death has not been confirmed outside of the NTC.

Comment

The Takeaway

NTC Spokesman: 'I Will Confirm That Gadhafi is Dead'

Thursday, October 20, 2011

"I will confirm that Gadhafi is dead and also his second man in the army, Abu Bakr Younus Jabr," Abdullah Kenshil told The Takeaway. "This is definitely confirmed by our commander and our miltary council in Tripoli, so he is killed." Kenshil was the chief negotiator for Libya's National Transitional Council's forces in Bani Walid. He and Sarah, a resident of Tripoli, react to Gadhafi's death.

Comment

WNYC News

Gadhafi, Libya's Leader for 42 Years, Killed

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Moammar Gadhafi, who ruled Libya with a dictatorial grip for 42 years, was killed Thursday when revolutionary forces overwhelmed his hometown, Sirte, the last major bastion of resistance two months after his regime fell. While most people in the New York region with ties to Libya welcomed the news, some had hoped Gadhafi would be captured alive.

Comment

The Takeaway

The Son of a Libyan Dissident on Gadhafi's Death

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Ahmed Almegaryaf's father was a Libyan political dissident opposed to Moammar Gadhafi. The elder Almegaryaf was kidnapped in Egypt in 1990, and is thought to have been held in a prison in Libya ever since. His children last heard from their father in a letter in 1993. The Takeaway spoke to Ahmed's brother, Bashir in August after Tripoli fell to the rebels. Ahmed reacts to the reported death of Col. Moammar Gadhafi, and shares his hopes for a new Libya.

Comment

The Takeaway

NTC: Moammar Gadhafi is Dead

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Col. Moammar Gadhafi was killed this morning in his birthplace of Sirte as forces of the National Transitional Council swept the city, according to the leader of the Tripoli military council. The reports have not been confirmed outside of the NTC. Unconfirmed reports also say his spokesman, Moussa Ibrahim, was captured, and Abu Bakr Younus Jabr, head of his military, was killed. Celebrations have erupted all over the country as Libyans rejoiced over the end of his rule. Gadhafi has been in hiding since Tripoli fell to rebel fighters on August 21.

Comment