Streams

 

Mississippi

The Takeaway

A Portrait of Resilience Five Years After Deepwater Horizon

Monday, April 20, 2015

Five years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the owner of a small business dependent on the water and the environment in southern Mississippi weighs in on what's changed.

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Selected Shorts

How To Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Beating the odds against racism.

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Selected Shorts

Against All Odds

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Growing up with snakes, and beating the odds.

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The Takeaway

Spotlight on Mississippi Prisons as Ex-Chief Indicted

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Christopher Epps was Mississippi's longest-serving corrections commissioner. He was recently indicted for accepting nearly $2 million in private prison bribes.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Losing a Husband to the Freedom Summer

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Rita Schwerner's husband Michael was one of three civil rights workers murdered by the KKK in Mississippi during 1964's Freedom Summer. Hear her talk about staying the course after his death.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

A Letter from Mississippi 1964

Monday, June 23, 2014

On today's Brian Lehrer Show we are taking calls and collecting stories from those with connections to 1964's Freedom Summer in Mississippi. Here is Brian Lehrer Show producer Jody Avirgan's contribution.

In August of 1964 my mother, Martha Honey, then a Freshman at Oberlin College in Ohio, traveled to Mississippi as a member of SNCC for the "Freedom Summer" campaign to register Black voters. She attended the funeral of James Chaney, one of three civil rights workers - Cheney was a black Southerner; Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner were white Northerners - murded by the Klu Klux Klan near Philadelphia, Mississippi. That evening she wrote a letter to a classmate. It appears in Howard Zinn's Voices of a People's History of the United States. Here is an excerpt:

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Two Moving Statements about the Civil Rights Workers Killed 50 years Ago Today

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Two Moving Statements about the Civil Rights Workers Killed 50 years Ago Today
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The Takeaway

Communities Fight Mississippi's Diabetes Crisis

Monday, January 20, 2014

Diabetes is quickly on the raise in Mississippi, with potentially a third of the population suffering with the disease by 2030. For the underfunded and under-resourced, the state of Mississippi is now looking toward community leaders to make health changes for residents at the local level. Dr. Michael Minor, the reverend at the Oak Hill Missionary Baptist Church in Hernado, MS, explains how his congregation is fighting obesity and diabetes.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Calvin Trillin Sings the Praises of Mozzarella and Hot Tamales

Thursday, January 09, 2014

New Yorker contributor Calvin Trillin describes his visits to the Hot Tamale Capital of the World—Greenville, Mississippi—and talks about the closing of his beloved Joe’s Dairy store on Sullivan Street in New York. He’s the author of "Mozzarella Story: A Cheese Ritual" in the December 2 issue of The New Yorker, and "Tamales on the Delta" in the January 6 issue.

 

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The Takeaway

Drought Closes Parts of Mississippi River

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

The Mississippi River is more than 12 feet lower than normal for this time of year. It's so difficult for boats to pass through that crews have shut down an 11-mile stretch to restore the depth. Over 100 ships are in line to pass through. 

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On The Media

The Lure of Reporting About Southern Stereotypes

Friday, March 23, 2012

In the lead-up to the Alabama and Mississippi presidential primaries the media seized on poll results which revealed surprising views on interracial marriage and Barack Obama's religion among likely Republican primary voters. Public Policy Polling, who conducted the poll, also asked people who they'd be voting for, but that information wasn't as attention-getting. Bob speaks with Michelle Cottle, a Southerner herself, who has been keeping tabs on media coverage of the polls for The Daily Beast

 

New Country Rehab - Ramblin' Man

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The Takeaway

Incarceration in America: Rethinking Solitary Confinement

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

All this week we’re talking about incarceration in America. Yesterday we looked at juvenile justice, and whether life-without-parole sentences for teenage murder convicts violates the Eighth Amendment's ban on cruel and unusual punishment. Today, we’re talking about super-maximum-security prisons and the effects of solitary confinement.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: The GOP's Primary Calendar is to Blame for 'Southern Nightmare'

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Republican leaders are defending the primary calendar and the decision to have so many contests divide delegates proportionately. I’m not so sure. A quick early victory would have spared the contenders the endless scrutiny of their positions on issues and their frequent slips of tongue.

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The Takeaway

Mississippi Pardons May Spark Manhunts

Friday, January 13, 2012

Mississippi's attorney general Jim Hood said Thursday that the state may have to issue a nationwide manhunt after four pardoned murderers left jail and "hit the road running." The four were among nearly 200 convicted criminals granted clemency by Governor  Barbour before he left office earlier this week. Why Barbour did this, and the legality of his selections, has been hotly debated by both members of the public and by victims' families.

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The Takeaway

Barbour Pardons Draw Public Outcry

Thursday, January 12, 2012

On Tuesday, outgoing Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour granted full and unconditional pardons to 193 inmates. Many of these prisoners had been convicted of murder, rape, assault and robbery. Four of those released had served as trustees in the governor's mansion as part of a program for inmates who earned special privileges. However, Barbour may have violated the state constitution by granting pardons without giving sufficient notice. As a result Attorney General Jim Hood has blocked the release of 21 of those inmates.

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The Takeaway

Storms Ravage Southeastern US

Thursday, November 17, 2011

At least five people are dead and many are injured after storms hit the nation's southeast. South Carolina, Georgia, Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi were all slammed by the severe weather and suspected tornadoes. Thousands remain without power. Derrick Becker, a public information officer for South Carolina Emergency Management, talks about what his organization is witnessing.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: 2011 Ballot Wins Mean Good News for Democrats

Wednesday, November 09, 2011

Ohio is also a crucial state in the November 2012 presidential contest, and this victory suggests that labor unions and moderates (or even liberals) may have recovered some lost momentum. That could be good news for President Obama who will face a tight reelection.

-Steffen Schmidt, It's A Free Country blogger.

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The Takeaway

Local Elections and What They Mean for 2012

Wednesday, November 09, 2011

Tuesday was Election Day across the country and voters in several states cast ballots on issues with national dimensions. Ohio voters struck down a law that restricts the collective bargaining rights of public workers. The landslide 62-38 result was setback for Republican Governor John Kasich, who implemented the law as a budget-cutting measure and campaigned across the state to prevent its defeat. Mississippi voters rejected the so-called "Personhood Amendment," which sought to outlaw abortions. In Arizona, voters defeated the main architect of that state's controversial immigration law.

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Studio 360

Jesmyn Ward: Waiting for Katrina

Friday, October 28, 2011

Jesmyn Ward was at the end of her summer break when Hurricane Katrina struck her hometown of Delisle, Mississippi. Bonus Track: Jesmyn Ward reads from Salvage the Bones

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The Takeaway

Was Mississippi Killing a Hate Crime?

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

The FBI, police and citizens of the city of Jackson, Missippi are debating whether the white teenagers who robbed and murdered James Craig Anderson, a black man, were motivated by racism. The case has prompted many to consider race relations in the state, and it's troubled history with race. The suspects' lawyers say it was just an act of teenage stupidity, but prosecutors say the killing was a premeditated racial killing. The U.S. Justice Department has begun an investigation into the case. Kim Severson has been reporting on the case for our partner, The New York Times.

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