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Middle East

The Brian Lehrer Show

Politics Beyond the Water's Edge

Monday, September 17, 2012

Mark Halperin, Time senior political analyst, editor-at-large, and co-author of Game Change, sets the week in politics, from the political fallout of the Middle East embassy attacks to new polling showing a consistent lead for President Obama.

Listeners: What did you learn last week about Obama and Romney's foreign policy approach? If you're an Obama supporter, are you satisfied with his reaction to the violence? If you're a Romney supporter, do you think he articulated his foreign policy effectively? Call 212-433-9692 or post below!

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The Takeaway

Flashpoints in the Post-Arab Spring World

Friday, September 14, 2012

Eleven years after September 11th, the relationship between the United States and the Islamic world is, in many ways, fraught with tension. The recent attack on the U.S. embassy in Libya left four Americans dead, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. Nicholas Kristof, columnist for The New York Times, helps put this latest moment of protest and religious furor into historical context.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Our Values: American Diplomacy In the Wake of Embassy Attacks

Friday, September 14, 2012

Fred Kaplan, War Stories columnist for Slate, discusses how the embassy protests in the Middle East have raised questions about the most effective way for diplomacy to spread U.S. "values."

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Deb Amos on Syria

Monday, August 06, 2012

Deborah Amos, who covers the Middle East for NPR News, discusses the ongoing crisis in Syria.

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The Takeaway

Was Yasser Arafat Poisoned?

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

In late 2004, Yasser Arafat had a flu, according to his spokesman. Seventeen days later, he was dead. Conspiracy theories have abounded since then. While doctors insist a severe hemorrhage led to his deadly stroke, others are convinced he was assassinated — by Israel's Mossad, by Palestinian extremists, or even by his own party.  

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The Takeaway

Mubarak "Clinically Dead"

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Back in February 2011, when Egyptians were protesting daily in Tahrir Square, we spoke with Omar Khalifa, a resident of Cairo and the director of O Media. He was skeptical about the revolution and felt the people of his country were rushing into something they weren’t prepared for. We check back in with Khalifa after Egyptian media yesterday reported that former president Hosni Mubarak suffered a stroke Tuesday and is "clinically dead."

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The Takeaway

Mubarak Sentenced to Life In Prison, Egyptians Take to the Streets Once More

Monday, June 04, 2012

When Hosni Mubarak was sentenced to life in prison on Saturday, some Egyptians rejoiced. But many felt the verdict didn’t go far enough, and took to the streets. On Sunday, Egypt's state prosecutor office said it would appeal the sentences and push once again for the death penalty. Michael Wahid Hanna researches Middle East policy for the Century Foundation in New York.

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It's A Free Country ®

Israel in 2012: Kristol Praises Obama, Notes Shift in Overall Debate

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

President Barack Obama's relationship with Israel is garnering a warm assessment from an unlikely source: William Kristol, the editor of the conservative Weekly Standard who just two years ago started a group called the Emergency Committee for Israel.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Nouri Al-Maliki

Thursday, May 10, 2012

Financial Times Middle East correspondent Michael Peel joins us to take a look at how Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Al-Maliki has ruled his country and responded to the various crises in the region.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Unfinished Arab Revolutions

Monday, March 26, 2012

Marc Lynch, a.k.a. @AbuAardvark, professor and director of the Institute for Middle East Studies at George Washington University, editor of the Middle East channel at Foreign Policy, and senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, talks about his new book, The Arab Uprising: The Unfinished Revolutions of the New Middle East.

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The Takeaway

President Obama to Meet With Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu

Monday, March 05, 2012

At this weekend's conference of the influential American Israel Public Affairs Committee, President Barack Obama reaffirmed the United States' commitment to Israel's security. During his remarks to the pro-Israel lobbying group, the President restated that, with regards to ensuring Iran does not obtain a nuclear weapon, all options are on the table. The President also said sanctions and diplomacy should be given a chance before further action is taken. Later today, the President will meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. The meeting will be the latest installment in what has been an uneasy relationship between the two leaders.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Jeremy Scahill on Yemen

Thursday, March 01, 2012

Jeremy Scahill, National Security Reporter for The Nation magazine, talks about the United States’ increasingly unpopular counter-terrorism efforts in Yemen.

 

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The Takeaway

'House of Stone': A Memoir by the Late Anthony Shadid

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Less than two weeks ago, Anthony Shadid, a foreign correspondent for The New York Times, died in Syria from an acute asthma attack. Shadid covered nearly two decades of Middle East conflict, won the Pulitzer Prize twice, and authored three books. "House of Stone," his final book, goes on sale today. 

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The Takeaway

Bill Keller on the Death of Anthony Shadid

Friday, February 17, 2012

This morning we are heartbroken to report that Anthony Shadid of our partner The New York Times is no longer one of the survivors. The veteran Middle East correspondent for The Times, Washington Post and Boston Globe and long time voice on this program has died. A fatal asthma attack while he was reporting in chaotic Syria, working undercover. His body carried across the Syrian border and home by a colleague yesterday.

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The Takeaway

Remembering Anthony Shadid

Friday, February 17, 2012

This morning we are heartbroken to report that Anthony Shadid of our partner The New York Times is no longer one of the survivors. The veteran Middle East correspondent for The Times, Washington Post and Boston Globe and long time voice on this program has died. A fatal asthma attack while he was reporting in chaotic Syria, working undercover. His body carried across the Syrian border and home by a colleague yesterday.

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The Takeaway

Will Israel Attack Iran?

Thursday, January 26, 2012

The escalating tension between Israel and Iran over the latter's nuclear program has been at the center of many foreign policy debates and diplomatic talks over the past decade. Proponents of an Israeli strike say it's needed for to preserve Israel's national security while detractors say such an attack would precipitate World War III. 

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The Takeaway

International Plans to End Syrian Conflict

Monday, January 23, 2012

Over the past ten months, Syrian Security Forces have killed more than 5,000 protestors across the country. But this weekend, two key voices announced their calls to action: the Arab League will seek U.N. Security Council approval to peacefully end the rule of President Bashar al-Assad, and Senators Kirsten Gillibrand and Chuck Schumer introduced a bill that would block financial aid and create trade sanctions against Syrian leaders involved in the crackdown.

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The Takeaway

US to Sell Weapons to Iraq, Despite Concerns

Thursday, December 29, 2011

Despite deep worries over the continuing stability of the Iraqi government, the U.S. is planning on selling $11 billion of arms and training to Iraq's military. The sale comes as Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki has attempted to marginalize Iraq's Sunni minority since the U.S. withdrew its forces earlier in the month, setting off concerns over civil war. The Obama administration hopes the sale, which includes tanks and fighter jets, will help Iraq build its military and secure its border with Iran. But some American officials worry Iraq's government will move to align itself with the Shiite theocracy in Tehran.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Iraq After the Withdrawal

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

New York Times correspondent Michael Schmidt and Sam Dagher, Wall Street Journal reporter in Iraq, discuss the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq this month, the state of the country nine years after the invasion that overthrew Saddam Hussein, sectarian violence, and their thoughts about the future of Iraq.

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The Takeaway

One Reporter Looks Back at His Year in the Arab Spring

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

On December 17, 2010, Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in protest of his treatment at the hands of municipal officials. His act of desperation would become the catalyst for a full-scale revolution that would sweep across North Africa and into the Middle East in what would become known as the Arab Spring. This week has brought more violent clashes between protesters and police in Egypt, but the idea of such actions transpiring just a year ago would have been unfathomable. The year 2011 has seen democratic movements swell in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and Syria.

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