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Middle East

The Takeaway

Libyan Arms Imports: A Troubling History

Friday, March 04, 2011

Since 2004, when the U.N. and U.S. removed an eighteen-year arms sanction, Libya has stockpiled weapons at a rate that far outpaced its military’s size or need. Arms have been sold to Libya at alarming rates — and for alarming profits — by countries throughout Europe. Most notably Italy, Malta, Germany and Russia. Those very same weapons are likely being used in a violent and deadly crackdown against protesters by the Gadhafi regime. The U.N. has now again imposed sanctions against the regime, halting the sale of weapons.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Women in Democracy Building in the Middle East

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

Karima Bennoune, professor at Rutgers School of Law and a specialist on the democracy movement, women's rights and religious extremism in the Middle East, and Egyptian-born Leila Ahmed (author of the forthcoming book A Quiet Revolution: The Veil's Resurgence, from the Middle East to America), professor at Harvard Divinity School whose work focuses on women and religion in the Middle East, discuss the role of religion and women in reform in the Middle East.

Read A Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Budget, Middle East, Jobs

Monday, February 28, 2011

The government is on the verge of a shutdown Friday, as Democrats and Republicans try and come up with some kind of resolution on the budget. Chrystia Freeland, global editor-at-large of Reuters, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC Radio, will look into their chrystal balls and see if any resolution is in sight. While Washington makes attempts at a budget resolution, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is heading to Switzherland to come up with a resolution on dealing with Col. Moammar el-Gadhafi and Libya. Are Gadhafi's days numbered? 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Middle East Update

Monday, February 28, 2011

Neil MacFarquharNew York Times Cairo correspondent and author of The Media Relations Department of Hizbollah Wishes You a Happy Birthday: Unexpected Encounters in the Changing Middle East, gives an update on the turmoil in the Middle East.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

John Cassidy on Islam and Economies

Friday, February 25, 2011

New Yorker staff writer John Cassidy looks at whether Islam is responsible for the lagging economies of many Arab countries. His article “Prophet Motive” appears in the February 28 issue of The New Yorker.

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It's A Free Country ®

Libyan Unrest and Gas Prices Here

Friday, February 25, 2011

[Prices] are not being moved by fundamentals. Supply is ample...What you have instead is a price being driven merely by the amount of money that flows into oil as an asset class, which in fact the oil market, or any commodity market, was never intended to be—an investment, a bet or a wager. In fact, it's become that, so when these geopolitical things happen you have this flood of money into a marketplace that was never designed to accept it, and you have an enormous spike in prices.

Dan Dicker, author of Oil's Endless Bid: Taming the Unreliable Price of Oil to Secure Our Economy, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Talking to the Taliban

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Steve Coll, president of the New America Foundation and contributor to the New Yorker, discusses his latest New Yorker article, which reveals that the U.S. has been in direct talks with the Taliban. He also reacts to the latest news from the Middle East.

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It's A Free Country ®

Comments Roundup: Voices of Arab New Yorkers

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

WNYC

On the Brian Lehrer Show today, North African and Middle Eastern New Yorkers called in with thoughts and feelings about the uprisings raging across the region. Plus, Debbie Almontaser, an educator and board chair of the Muslim Consultative Network whose brother lives in Yemen, discussed her views on what's happening in the Middle East.

Comments [1]

WQXR News

Bahrain Clamps Down on Protests in Manama

Friday, February 18, 2011

Bahrain has taken its strongest action yet to clamp down on continuing protests in the country.

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It's A Free Country ®

Protecting Journalists

Friday, February 18, 2011

Journalists are seen as putting themselves on an airplane and into the fray. It's a kind of "you didnt have to be there" attitude...There's a lot of condemnation for independent freelancers that a lot of networks rely on. Frequently, there isn't that sympathy as much as there is for tourists or someone who just happened to be there by accident.

Maryam Ishani, a reporter who was assaulted in Cairo during anti-government protests, on the Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [5]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Protecting Journalists

Friday, February 18, 2011

Frank Smyth, Washington, DC representative for the Committee to Protect Journalists, and Maryam Ishani, online video media producer for Reuters who was assaulted in Cairo on February 2nd while covering the uprising in Egypt, discuss the recent violence against journalists in the Middle East and the status of journalists covering the recent uprisings in the region.

→Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

WQXR News

Protests Erupt in Libya, Continue in Region

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

As protests continue to spread in the Middle East, new reports from Libya indicate the beginnings of an uprising in that country.

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It's A Free Country ®

The 2011 Food Crisis

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

High food prices are not by themselves a guarantee that governments will fall, because if it were, we'd see overhauls in the governments of India or China. It's certainly the case that higher food prices combined with other things are like revolution kindling. A food price spike can spark something that can turn into this kind of democratic overhaul.

Raj Patel, visiting scholar at UC Berkeley's Center for African Studies, on The Brian Lehrer Show

Comments [19]

The Brian Lehrer Show

2011 Food Crisis

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Raj Patel, visiting scholar at UC Berkeley's Center for African Studies, fellow at Food First, and author of The Value of Nothing: How to Reshape Market Society and Redefine Democracy, discusses the global food crisis, and how rising prices are playing a role in the unrest in the Middle East.

→Read a Recap and Join the Discussion at It's a Free Country

It's A Free Country ®

How Will Uprisings Change U.S. Policy in the Middle East?

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

WNYC
We had a deal with the Arab world for 30 years which was, you give us cheap oil, a stable supply of oil, and we'll stay out of your business. That deal fell apart on 9/11. First of all, oil is no longer cheap, and secondly, they weren't stable, and obviously threatened us. Reform in the Arab world has been something since 9/11 the U.S. government has been trying to push. We didn't know how to do it, George Bush thought we would invade Iraq and democracy would blossom all around the Arab world, that did not happen.

Nancy Soderberg, deputy national security advisor to the Clinton administration, former UN Ambassador and president of the Connect U.S. Fund, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

Comments [11]

It's A Free Country ®

Egypt in the Eyes of the USA

Monday, February 14, 2011

To some extent, we all know democracy works best when it comes from the country itself, out of its own traditions, its own people, its own leadership. Egypt has demonstrated that, not that a foreign country can make those kinds of things happen. We ought to be very carfeul about that.

—Ambassador Thomas Pickering,of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy, on The Brian Lehrer Show

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Egypt in the Eyes of the USA

Monday, February 14, 2011

Ambassador Thomas Pickering of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy reflects on what the Egyptian revolution will mean for the American relationship to Egypt and the rest of the Middle East.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Last Shah of Iran

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Abbas Milani discusses Mohammad-Reza Shah Pahlevi, the last Shah of Iran, who shaped Iran’s modern age and the contemporary politics of the Middle East, and gives an account Iran’s turn from politically moderate monarchy to totalitarian Islamic republic. His biography The Shah is an account of the man full of contradictions, who made Iran a global power, and how U.S. and Iranian relations have reached the point where they are today.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Egypt and U.S. Policy

Friday, February 04, 2011

Leslie Gelb, president emeritus of the Council on Foreign RelationsDaily Beast contributor, and author of Power Rules: How Common Sense Can Rescue American Foreign Policy, weighs in on the uprising in Egypt, what U.S. policy should be toward the country, and how "the devil we know" might be preferable to the Muslim Brotherhood.

Comments [27]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Rising Food Prices and Global Uprising

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Lester Brown, president of the Earth Policy Institute and author of World on the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse, describes what’s driving the rise in food prices around the world – from the changing environment to population growth. Plus, find out how commodities prices are connected to the rising dissatisfaction in many developing countries.

Comments [2]