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Middle East

The Brian Lehrer Show

Tweeting and Reporting the Revolution

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Alex Nunns, editor of the new book Tweets from Tahrir, and Rula Jebreal, author of the book Miral and an Italo-Palestinian journalist working in the Middle East, discuss new and old media in the recent political developments in the Middle East. They will both be on a panel Wednseday night as part of the Pen World Voices festival.

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The Takeaway

Verifying the Videos of an Uprising

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

For several weeks we’ve watched as videos have trickled out of Syria onto YouTube and other websites. The Syrian activists who take the video say they are images of protests that turned violent at the hands of the Syrian government.

 

 

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The Takeaway

Who Determines US Foreign Policy in the Middle East?

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Since January 25, when a wave of popular protests began to sweep across the Middle East region, the U.S. has been put into several very precarious policy positions. The most obvious question is: should the U.S. stand on the side of revolution and support the protesters seeking new Democratic leadership; or, should we continue to support the incumbent, sometimes brutal, autocratic regimes that have been our long-time allies in the region? The answers aren't always clear. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Syria's Business

Friday, April 22, 2011

Large protests are planned for Syria today - Tara Bahrampour of the Washington Post updates the latest. Then, Steve Clemons, director of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation and the man behind the popular political blog The Washington Note, discusses the latest developments in Libya.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Empire and the Middle East

Monday, April 18, 2011

Marwan Bishara, senior political analyst for Al-Jazeera English and host of Empire, the monthly show about global powers, talks about the latest news from the Middle East and North Africa and shares his perspective on the political dynamics of the region.

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The Takeaway

NATO: A Divided Mission in Libya?

Friday, April 15, 2011

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is in Berlin attending NATO meetings, where members of the alliance are debating whether to step up their attacks on Libyan forces. Meanwhile, Libyan rebels are warning of an immanent blood bath in the city of Misurata if NATO does not intensify their air attacks. Thursday, Col. Moammar Gaddhafi rode around around Tripoli in a convertible, defiantly waving his fists at the allied forces. What is the way forward for NATO and is its latest combat mission a reflection of how little it can do to with such a divided force?

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The Takeaway

Pakistan to US Ops: Get Out

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

It's been several weeks since the CIA operative Raymond Davis was released from custody in Pakistan for reportedly killing two armed men in a traffic incident in Lahore, Pakistan. Since his release, relations between the US and Pakistan have been strained. The tensions have grown not only over the questions relating to the diplomatic immunity of Raymond Davis and his 47 days of detention, but also over a US drone attack that killed tribal leaders last month. Now Pakistan is demanding that the United States sharply reduce the number of CIA and Special Ops forces working in the country, and put drone strikes on hold.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Sarkozy Leads France Into Battle

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

New York Times Paris bureau chief Steve Erlanger, and Nicole Bacharan, political analyst and associate researcher at Sciences Po., Paris, discuss the full-face veil ban's reception in France and reaction to President Sarkozy's push toward intervention in the Middle East.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Protests in the Arab World, Part II

Friday, April 08, 2011

Our look at Friday protests throughout the Arab World continues with Christoph Wilcke, Senior Researcher in the Middle East and North Africa Division of Human Rights Watch, who gives us an update on the protests in Jordan. We’ll find out why the protests there have been relatively orderly and how the Jordanian government and King Abdullah II have responded to the protesters’ demands.

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Ali Abdullah Saleh

Thursday, April 07, 2011

Despite 32 years of near absolute rule, the regime of President Ali Abdullah Saleh is teetering. A rapidly intensifying protest movement, along with an insurgency in the north and a secessionist movement in the south have put Yemen on the brink of unraveling. Christopher Boucek, an associate in the Carnegie Enowment for International Peace’s Middle East program, looks at how President Saleh has kept a grip on power, even as ambassadors from the six Gulf Cooperation Council countries meet opposition representatives in Saudi Arabia to work on negotiating a deal for his exit.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Anthony Shadid on Covering Libya

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

Anthony Shadid, Beirut bureau chief for The New York Times, talks about covering the unrest in Libya and being captured by the Libyan government and held for six days, along with his colleagues Lynsey Addario, Stephen Farrell and Tyler Hicks. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Saudi Connection

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

Caryle Murphy correspondent for GlobalPost, The Christian Science Monitor and author of Passion for Islam: Shaping the Modern Middle East: The Egyptian Experience, talks about Saudi Arabia's role in the unrest in the Middle Eastern protests, as Saudi troops are in Bahrain and Libya.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Food, Love, and War

Tuesday, April 05, 2011

Annia Ciezadlo gives an account of civilian life during wartime. She spent six years living in Baghdad and Beirut, where she broke bread with Shiites and Sunnis, warlords and refugees, matriarchs and mullahs. Day of Honey: A Memoir of Food, Love, and War is about the hunger for food and friendship in times of war, and she writes about food and the rituals of eating to show a side of the Middle East that most Americans never see.

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The Takeaway

Moral Imperatives in the Middle East

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

In his address to the nation on Monday, President Barack Obama explained the rationale behind sending US military troops to Libya. In describing the situation, the President reminded Americans that "If [America] waited one more day, Benghazi, a city nearly the size of Charlotte would suffer a massacre that would have reverberated across the region and stained the conscience of the world. It was not in our national interests to let that happen. I refused to let that happen.But what if it happens in other countries, like Yemen?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Political Risk Abroad

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group, talks about what the instability in the economies in the Middle East and Japan might mean globally.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Today in the Middle East

Friday, March 25, 2011

Gideon Rose editor of Foreign Affairs Magazine and author of How Wars End: Why We Always Fight the Last Battle talks about the military conflict in Libya and other news from the Middle East.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Update on the Protests in the Arab World

Friday, March 25, 2011

Robert Powell, the Middle East analyst for the Economist Intelligence Unit, gives us an update on the protests across the Arab World and on the Syrian government’s response to Thursday’s protest marches and the marches planned for today.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: The House of Saud

Thursday, March 24, 2011

The Saudi Royal family has been a close ally with the United States for decades; they are also one of the most repressive regimes in the Middle East. Madawi Al-Rasheed, Professor of Anthropology of Religion at Kings College, London, looks into the history of the family, how they rule the country with an iron fist and why a nascent protest movement there has been suppressed.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Continuing Protests Across the Middle East

Monday, March 21, 2011

The protests in Yemen and Bahrain have turned violent over the past week. Fawaz Gerges, professor of Middle Eastern Politics and International Relations at the London School of Economics, and Mustapha K. Al-Sayyid, professor of political science at The American University in Cairo and director of the Center for the Study of Developing Countries at Cairo University, describe the government reaction to the protests, how other governments in the region are reacting to the unrest, and where the protest movements go from here.

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The Takeaway

Egypt Heads Toward Constitutional Referendum Vote

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton flew to Cairo yesterday for the first official U.S. visit to Egypt since Hosni Mubarak stepped down from power. During the visit, she emphasized the continued support being offered by the Obama administration to the people of Egypt as they transition into a new government. "To the people of Egypt, this moment belongs to you," Clinton said. "You broke barriers and overcame obstacles to pursue the dream of democracy."

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