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Middle East

The Takeaway

Mideast Models for Egypt's Nascent Democracy

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

The popular uprising in Egypt is unprecedented as citizens forced an end to President Hosni Mubarak’s 30 year regime. The transition to a democratic government will be fraught with challenges, but such a transition is not unprecedented in the region. What does democracy look like in the Middle East?

Marina Ottaway, Director Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace where she studies the introduction of Democracy to the region.
We’re also joined by Marie Colvin.  Foreign Affairs Correspondent for the SundayTimes.

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The Takeaway

Abuelaish's Story: 'I Shall Not Hate'

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Egypt has a key role as an ally to both Israel and Gazan Palestinians. It's one of the few countries that has a relationship with both groups. As the political ground shifts yet again in the Middle East, we take a look at one Palestinian doctor and how he came to be an advocate for peace in Gaza.

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The Takeaway

Reflecting on March of Millions

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

In what is being dubbed the "March of Millions," hundreds of thousands of Egyptians have taken to the streets in the eighth day of protests against President Hosni Mubarak. Demonstrations have vowed to remain on the streets until Mubarak, who has held his position for more than 30 years, quits. Protests are taking place in Tahrir Square, which translates to Liberation Square.

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The Takeaway

Where America Stands on Democracy in the Middle East

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

The United States is performing a difficult balancing act in how to respond to the tumult in Egypt. The Obama administration was quick to show support for protesters who are pushing for democratic reform in the Middle East, but hasn't forcefully called for the end to Mubarak's regime.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Rachel Martin on Egypt and the U.S.

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Rachel Martin, national security correspondent for NPR, discusses Washington's reaction to the unfolding events in Egypt. 

Read More and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Arab-Americans Reflect on Uprisings Back Home

Monday, January 31, 2011

As popular uprisings spread through the Middle East, challenging autocratic regimes and upending old social orders, The Takeaway speaks with three Arab Americans about the upheaval and its meaning for their friends and family.

 

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The Takeaway

Arab-Americans React to Uprisings Back Home

Friday, January 28, 2011

As uprisings spread through the Middle East, Arab-Americans living in the New York area reflect on what this means to their countries of origin. Nancy Yousef came to America from Egypt, and now works as a Professor of English Literature at CUNY Baruch in New York. Naima Nour moved to the US from Tunisia 10 years ago and is the founder and director of the Tunisian Cultural & Information Center USA. And Raja Althaibani, from Yemen, is currently working on her BA in Human Rights and International Development.

 

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The Takeaway

Egypt Takes Stock After Major Protests

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Protests erupted in the streets of Cairo and other major Egyptian cities yesterday, calling for the ousting of the 30-year rule of President Hosni Mubarak. Protesters are hoping to share the same success protestors in Tunisia saw in recent weeks, but that may prove to be more difficult dealing with the Egyptian government and military which are much larger and stronger. Emad Shahin, Henry R. Luce associate professor of religion, conflict and peace building at the University of Notre Dame, analyzes these protests and the Egyptian government.

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The Takeaway

Hezbollah Chooses Lebanon's New Prime Minister

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Hezbollah, the Shiite military group based in Lebanon, has chosen the country's next prime minister, Najib Miqati. Reaction to the new prime minister is divided, with about half the country supporting Hezbollah, and the other half mounting protests backed by caretaker Prime Minister Saad al-Hariri. Miqati tells the BBC, "I'm a moderate guy, I'm a moderate politician."

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The Takeaway

Could Popular Uprising in Tunisia Spread to Other Arab States?

Monday, January 17, 2011

Tunisia's army clashed with armed gangs in Tunisia's capital on Sunday, two days after a popular uprising forced long-time dictator, President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, to flee the country. Popular support for Tunisians’ freedom is echoing across the Arab world. Anthony Shadid, a foreign correspondent for The New York Times, has reported from most countries in the Middle East over his fifteen year career. He says that the Arab world is facing its most dangerous and yawning divide between ruler and ruled.

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The Takeaway

Protests Continue in Tunisia

Friday, January 14, 2011

Thousands of demonstrators have gathered in the Tunisian capital, Tunis, to protest the rule of President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, who announced that he would not seek re-election in 2014. The country has been rattled for weeks by protests over high unemployment, inflation and corruption. The protests have left 23 dead.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Middle East in Literature

Thursday, December 30, 2010

Reza Aslan, associate professor of creative writing at the University of California, Riverside, and author of No God But God, discusses the new anthology he edited, Tablet & Pen: Literary Landscapes from the Modern Middle East.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

WikiLeaks and the Arab World

Thursday, December 02, 2010

Rami Khouri, director of the Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs at the American University of Beirut, talks about the portrayal of Arab leaders in the WikiLeaks cables, and the response overseas.

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The Takeaway

Pakistan's High Commissioner on Nuclear Security

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

On of the United States' largest concerns in the Middle East has long been the relative security of Pakistan, and more specifically, the security of that country's nuclear weapons. America provides millions of dollars in aid there, and the Pakistani government is considered an ally in an unstable area of the world. But in a country where the Taliban and other organizations have infiltrated the state military, it's a constant balancing act. 

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Features

Hero: The Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia

Monday, November 29, 2010

WNYC interviews Novelist Michael Korda about his new biography of T. E. Lawrence, "Hero."

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Middle East in Literature

Monday, November 15, 2010

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Talk to Me

Here—and Everywhere—at The New Yorker Festival

Friday, October 01, 2010

The annual New Yorker Magazine Festival colonizes the city for one weekend a year. When the magazine was founded by the legendary editor Harold Ross in 1925, he famously said that it was not “for the little old lady in Dubuque.” Today, the magazine is national and international in scope, but for the Festival, it calls home its impressive roster of critics, investigative reporters, writers, editors, and other contributors of all stripes to host panels, conduct interviews, and perform in venues all over the city.

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The Takeaway

The Mechanics and Theater Behind Mideast Peace Talks

Thursday, September 02, 2010

Since the Six-Day War in 1967, American presidents have tried long and hard to encourage peace in the Middle East. After he helped ink the Camp David Accords, former President Jimmy Carter insightfully warned that peace would not come easily. "The questions that have brought warfare and bitterness to the Middle East for the last thirty years will not be settled overnight," he said. Now, six presidencies and thirty years later, lasting peace has yet to be achieved.

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The Takeaway

Another Round of Arab-Israeli Peace Talks

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

Now this is going to sound somewhat familiar… the White House is hosting direct talks, starting today, to begin brokering an Arab-Israeli peace agreement, ideally to be formalized within the next year. Both Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President of the Palestinian Authority Mahmoud Abbas will be in Washington today for the first face-to-face talks in two years.

Expectations are low, and the inevitable question arises: is anything really new this time around?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Thomas Friedman's World

Monday, August 30, 2010

Thomas Friedman, New York Times columnist and author of Hot, Flat, and Crowded 2.0 offers insights into Iraq, other issues.

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