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Middle East

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Libya, Budget, Muslim Radicalization

Monday, March 07, 2011

Whether or not to enforce a no-fly zone over Libya is becoming a hot issue in Washington. Many lawmakers like Senator John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Senator John Kerry (D-Mass.), are calling for a no-fly zone, as rebels in Libya face rough times against the better equiped Libyan armed forces. Callie Crossley, host of The Callie Crossley Show on WGBH in Boston, looks at what we can expect next in the Libyan crisis this week.

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The Takeaway

YouTube Video Mocks Gadhafi

Monday, February 28, 2011

Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, who appears to be on his way out, is getting his share of satirical punches on the viral video circuit. A video mocking Gadhafi has gone viral, getting over 650,000 hits on YouTube, and has been met with postive reviews from the Arab community, especially in Libya. Here's the twist — the video was made by a Jewish Israeli, Noy Alooshe, a journalist, musician and internet buff.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Unrest in the Petrol States

Friday, February 25, 2011

Steve LeVine of "The Oil and the Glory" blog at Foreign Policy, and Dan Dicker author of Oil's Endless Bid: Taming the Unreliable Price of Oil to Secure Our Economy, discuss the unrest in the Middle East and its relationship to the soaring price of oil and the rising price of gas.

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The Takeaway

After Day of Bloody Protest, Gadhafi Firm on Staying

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Yesterday was among the deadliest days of protest in Libya, with Al Jazeera reporting there may have been more than two hundred deaths on Monday alone. Government forces and militiamen beseiged the capitol, dropping small bombs from planes and firing live rounds at protestors. Early Tuesday morning, Libya's state television showed Libyan leader Muammar Gadhafi, in a short appearance, dismissing rumos he had fled the country. Meanwhile, Libyan opposition leaders are calling upon the international community, particularly the United States, to take a stronger stance against the Gadhafi regime.

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The Takeaway

Examining Western Interests in Libya

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Yesterday afternoon former President Bill Clinton said in a statement: “The world is watching the situation in Libya with alarm. The government of Libya has a responsibility to respect the universal rights of the people, including the right to free expression and assembly.” The EU, Italy’s Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi and other European figureheads made similar condemnations. But it's not always as simple as tyranny against democracy, is it? Lybia is a country in which the West is invested. 

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The Takeaway

Updates from Bahrain and Libya

Monday, February 21, 2011

Protests continued to rage across the Middle East throughout the weekend. While the Bahraini government withdrew its military from the capital and allowed peaceful demonstrations, Libyan security forces continued to fire on protestors in Benghazi and Tripoli. Human Rights Watch estimates that the Libyan government has killed at least 223 protesters since political unrest began six days ago. But in a nationally-televised address, the son of Libyan ruler Col. Moammar Gadhafi, Seif al-Islam al-Gadhafi, claimed that the death toll was greatly exaggerated and that Libya was on the brink of civil war. Will Gadhafi hold onto power? What's next for Bahrain? And how will the Obama Administration respond?

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The Takeaway

State Dept's PJ Crowley on US Mid-East Foreign Policy

Friday, February 18, 2011

Egypt, Bahrain, Yemen, Libya: Friend or foe? That question is getting harder to answer, as crackdowns on protests in the Middle East by U.S. allied governments blur the lines. Just in December, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised Bahrain for its progress on the road to democracy. Today, the State Department reaped criticism for their weak stance against the police violence that has left at least six dead. But how will the U.S. realign itself, should Shiite protestors topple the government in Bahrain — a strategic partner that guarantees military access to the region? And what about Yemen, an ally against terrorist forces in the region? What will the new U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East look like after the wave of change is over?

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The Takeaway

Libya and the History of Moammar Gadhafi's Rule

Friday, February 18, 2011

Verifiable updates have been hard to come by in Libya, where more protests have been reported over the past several days. There is a notable absence of independent journalists reporting from there because of iron-clad restrictions on the press and on the Internet. Protests were reported by ex-patriots around the world who have contacts in Libya. The protests were aimed Libya’s ruler, Moammar Gadhafi, who has been in power for 41 years. What is situation in the North African country today, and what does it say about Gadhafi's rule? 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

US Foreign Policy: Egypt and Beyond

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Ambassador Nancy Soderberg, deputy national security advisor to the Clinton administration, former UN Ambassador, and president of the Connect U.S. Fund, joins us to talk about the U.S. response to democratic movements beyond Egypt.

→ Read a Recap and Join the Discussion at It's A Free Country

The Brian Lehrer Show

After Egypt

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Marwan Muasher served as foreign minister (2002-2004) and deputy prime minister (2004-2005) of Jordan.  He is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and author of The Arab Center: The Promise of Moderation.  He joins us to discuss how movements in Egypt might spread through the rest of the Middle East, and how regional governments are reacting.

→Read a Recap and Join the Discussion at It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Middle East, Budget, G20 Summit

Monday, February 14, 2011

With protesters in Egypt successfully overthrowing President Hosni Mubarak, following successful protests in Tunisia, we take a look at Yemen. That country has seen protests all weekend — not from the opposition but from the youth of the country, who have organized primarily via text messaging. Noel King, managing producer for The Takeaway, looks at why the U.S. should be keeping a close eye on what's happening in Yemen, as well as in Iran. 

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The Takeaway

As Protests Continue in Egypt, a Look at Democracy in Southeast Asia

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

It’s day 16 of protests in Egypt and demonstrators say they won’t let up until President Hosni Mubarak steps down. Ultimately, the activists on the streets are demanding free and fair elections and a commitment to a democratic government. We’ve talked in depth about the intersection of democracy and Islam in the Middle East, and the challenges of trying to blend the two ideals. But in Southeast Asia, Muslim nations like Indonesia and Malaysia have relatively successful democracies. What makes democracy in those populous Muslim countries work?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Religion and Revolution

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

Reza Aslan, associate professor of creative writing at the University of California, Riverside and author of  Tablet & Pen: Literary Landscapes from the Modern Middle East, compares the role of religion in the United States and Egypt as protest continues throughout the Arab world. 

→ Read A Recap And Join The Discussion At It's A Free Country

The Takeaway

Mideast Protests and President Bush's 'Freedom Agenda'

Monday, February 07, 2011

As political unrest spreads across the Middle East, analysts here in the United States wonder whether and how U.S. policy has influenced the protestors. How does the U.S.’s increasing role in the Middle East since 9/11 — in Afghanistan, Iraq and in the Israel-Palestine conflict — relate to the current political instability in the reigon?

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Egypt, Jobs and the Economy

Monday, February 07, 2011

Egypt will likely dominate the headlines all week, with everyone waiting to see if President Hosni Mubarak will cede to the wishes of the protesters and step down. Calli Crossley, host of The Callie Crossley Show on WGBH in Boston, looks at what's ahead this week for the people of Egypt and its government. Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC in New York, looks at the potential impact the uprising in Egypt could have on the price of oil, and on how it could impact trade on the Suez Canal.

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The Takeaway

Assessing Syria: Desire for Change?

Friday, February 04, 2011

We've seen a domino effect in the Mideast as protests in Tunisia sparked the continued unrest in Egypt. Over the past week opposition activists in Syria have gathered in small groups to pay homage to the protestors in Egypt, while a Facebook group, run mostly by Syrian expatriates, is trying to organize a "Day of Rage" in that country.

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The Takeaway

High Food Prices and Unemployment Fuel Uprisings in the Middle East

Friday, February 04, 2011

This week we’ve been covering the rise in oil prices during the unrest in Egypt. Yesterday anxiety in the region sent the price of a barrel of oil above $100. Additionally, the combination of high global food prices and high unemployment is making the prospect of these countries returning to some sense of normalcy seem untenable in the near future.

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The Takeaway

Arab-Americans Reflect on Week of Protests

Friday, February 04, 2011

Political demonstrations have swept across the Middle East this week, with protestors taking to the streets in Egypt, Yemen and Syria. In Yemen, the protests was hailed as the "day of rage;" in Syria it's being called the "day of anger;" and today in Egypt, protesters are calling for a "day of departure."

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The Takeaway

Amid Political Turmoil in Arab World, Yemen's President Pledges to Step Down in 2013

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Following massive protests in Egypt and Tunisia, longtime president of Yemen, Ali Abdullah Saleh, announced he would not seek re-election in 2013. He also pledged that he his son would not be his successor. The concessions come ahead of planned anti-government protests in Yemen today.

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The Takeaway

Israel Eyes Events in Egypt Closely

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

As Egypt changes, the country's relationship with Israel becomes fragile. With President Hosni Mubarak pledging not to seek re-election in September, Israeli leaders are worried Egypt could fall into the hands of radical Islamic groups. This includes a fear that the Muslim Brotherhood may emerge as the leadership in the country.

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