Streams

 

 

Michael Torke

New Sounds

Synesthesia

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

Hear music that was imagined in colors, by composers who have synesthesia, a rare neurological phenomenon where two or more of their senses cross wires and connect in an unusual way.

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New Sounds

Synesthesia

Monday, February 10, 2014

Hear music that was imagined in colors. The featured composers in this episode of New Sounds have synesthesia, a rare neurological phenomenon where two or more of their senses cross wires and connect in an unusual way. While some synesthetes relate numbers to textures or words to tastes, these musicians see colors when hearing music and vice versa. Hear Andy Akiho’s and Michael Torke’s musical interpretations of yellow, Aphex Twin’s blue, Robert Fripp’s red, and a darker crimson from Akiho again. Also included in the episode are works by non-synesthetes — electronica artist Sam KDC with his track titled “Synesthesia,” a jazz power trio named after synesthetic artist Wassily Kandinsky, and Keith Jarrett with his improvisational take on light/dark.

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The Brothers Balliett

A Kaleidoscopic Array of Colorful Curiosities

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Whether you have full blown synesthesia, or you've just always thought that D Major sounds kind of blue, humans have associated color with music for ages. This week, the Brothers Balliett serve up colorful music from Dalbavie, Torke and Thompson.

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The Brothers Balliett

Night of the Living Symphony Orchestra

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Have you ever wondered what it would be like if a major symphony orchestra took a page from the Q2 Music handbook? Today at 3 pm, the Brothers Balliett offer a program devised to follow traditional symphony concert format.

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Q2 Music

The Propulsive Post-Minimalism of Michael Torke

Monday, August 06, 2012

A decade or two before post-minimalism became the lingua franca of emerging American composers, the young Michael Torke was already building his career on it. Learn more about Torke and listen to the composer himself introduce many of his key works. 

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